South Amboy, New Jersey

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South Amboy, New Jersey
City
City of South Amboy
South Amboy highlighted in Middlesex County. Inset: Location of Middlesex County in New Jersey.
South Amboy highlighted in Middlesex County. Inset: Location of Middlesex County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of South Amboy, New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of South Amboy, New Jersey.
Coordinates: 40°29′12″N 74°16′44″W / 40.486719°N 74.279016°W / 40.486719; -74.279016Coordinates: 40°29′12″N 74°16′44″W / 40.486719°N 74.279016°W / 40.486719; -74.279016[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Middlesex
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Government[6]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • Mayor Fred Henry (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Administrator Camille Tooker[4]
 • Clerk Kathy Vigilante[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 2.694 sq mi (6.976 km2)
 • Land 1.548 sq mi (4.008 km2)
 • Water 1.146 sq mi (2.967 km2)  42.54%
Area rank 364th of 566 in state
19th of 25 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 10 ft (3 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 8,631
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 8,721
 • Rank 265th of 566 in state
19th of 25 in county[12]
 • Density 5,577.1/sq mi (2,153.3/km2)
 • Density rank 94th of 566 in state
7th of 25 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 08879[13]
Area code(s) 732/848
FIPS code 3402368550[14][2][15]
GNIS feature ID 0885399[16][2]
Website http://www.southamboynj.gov/

South Amboy is a city in Middlesex County, New Jersey, on the Raritan Bay. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 8,631,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 718 (+9.1%) from the 7,913 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 50 (+0.6%) from the 7,863 counted in the 1990 Census.[17]

South Amboy, and Perth Amboy across the Raritan River, are collectively referred to as The Amboys. Signage for Exit 11 on the New Jersey Turnpike refers to "The Amboys" as a destination.

South Amboy has passed through three of the five types of New Jersey municipalities. It was first mentioned on May 28, 1782, in minutes of the Board of chosen freeholders minutes as having been formed from Perth Amboy Township, and then formally incorporated as a township on February 21, 1798. Over the next 90 years, portions broke away to form Monroe Township (April 9, 1838), Madison Township (March 2, 1869; later Old Bridge Township) and Sayreville Township (April 6, 1876; later Borough of Sayreville). As of February 25, 1888, South Amboy borough was formed, replacing South Amboy Township. On April 11, 1908, South Amboy was incorporated as a city, replacing South Amboy borough, with a referendum held on July 21, 1908.[18]

Geography[edit]

South Amboy is located at 40°29′12″N 74°16′44″W / 40.486719°N 74.279016°W / 40.486719; -74.279016 (40.486719,-74.279016). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 2.694 square miles (6.976 km2), of which, 1.548 square miles (4.008 km2) of it is land and 1.146 square miles (2.967 km2) of it (42.54%) is water.[1][2]

Area codes 732 and 848 are used in South Amboy. The city had been in Area code 908, until January 1, 1997, when 908 was split forming Area code 732. South Amboy has an enclave near Kohl's in Sayreville. Residents of those apartments use a South Amboy mailing address.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1790 2,626
1810 3,071
1820 3,406 10.9%
1830 3,782 11.0%
1840 1,825 * −51.7%
1850 2,266 24.2%
1860 3,652 61.2%
1870 4,525 * 23.9%
1880 3,648 * −19.4%
1890 4,330 18.7%
1900 6,349 46.6%
1910 7,007 10.4%
1920 7,897 12.7%
1930 8,476 7.3%
1940 7,802 −8.0%
1950 8,422 7.9%
1960 8,422 0.0%
1970 9,338 10.9%
1980 8,322 −10.9%
1990 7,863 −5.5%
2000 7,913 0.6%
2010 8,631 9.1%
Est. 2012 8,721 [11] 1.0%
Population sources: 1790-1920[19]
1840[20] 1850-1870[21] 1850[22]
1870[23] 1880-1890[24]
1890-1910[25] 1910-1930[26]
1930-1990[27] 2000[28][29] 2010[8][9][10]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[18]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 8,631 people, 3,372 households, and 2,256 families residing in the city. The population density was 5,577.1 per square mile (2,153.3 /km2). There were 3,576 housing units at an average density of 2,310.7 per square mile (892.2 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 86.42% (7,459) White, 4.43% (382) Black or African American, 0.10% (9) Native American, 4.03% (348) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 2.99% (258) from other races, and 2.03% (175) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 13.42% (1,158) of the population.[8]

There were 3,372 households, of which 28.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.8% were married couples living together, 14.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.1% were non-families. 26.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.11.[8]

In the city, 20.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.6% from 18 to 24, 29.8% from 25 to 44, 29.5% from 45 to 64, and 11.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.3 years. For every 100 females there were 96.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.2 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $61,566 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,388) and the median family income was $80,815 (+/- $4,285). Males had a median income of $54,000 (+/- $5,767) versus $49,303 (+/- $4,574) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $31,590 (+/- $2,232). About 10.2% of families and 9.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.7% of those under age 18 and 5.5% of those age 65 or over.[30]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[14] there were 7,913 people, 2,967 households, and 2,041 families residing in the city. The population density was 5,102.1 people per square mile (1,971.1/km2). There were 3,110 housing units at an average density of 2,005.3 per square mile (774.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 94.22% White, 0.86% African American, 0.19% Native American, 1.38% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.71% from other races, and 1.62% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.75% of the population.[28][29]

There were 2,967 households out of which 32.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.8% were married couples living together, 14.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.2% were non-families. 25.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.22.[28][29]

In the city the population was spread out with 24.3% under the age of 18, 7.7% from 18 to 24, 32.9% from 25 to 44, 21.5% from 45 to 64, and 13.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 95.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.0 males.[28][29]

The median income for a household in the city was $50,529, and the median income for a family was $62,029. Males had a median income of $42,365 versus $29,737 for females. The per capita income for the city was $23,598. About 6.7% of families and 7.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.6% of those under age 18 and 6.0% of those age 65 or over.[28][29]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

South Amboy is governed under the Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council) system of municipal government with a mayor elected directly by the voters. The City Council consists of five members, two of whom are elected on an at-large basis while three are elected from wards.[6]

As of 2013, the Mayor of South Amboy is Fred Henry, whose term of office ends December 31, 2014.[31] Members of the City Council are Council President Joseph E. Connors (at-large), Donald Applegate (First Ward), Michael Gross (at-large), Zusette Dato (Third Ward) and Mark Noble (Second Ward).[32] Following the death of Russell Stillwagon in June 2010 after serving nearly two decades on the City Council, Donald Applegate was chosen the following month by councilmembers from among three names proposed to fill the vacancy representing the First Ward.[33]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

South Amboy is located in the 6th Congressional District[34] and is part of New Jersey's 19th state legislative district.[9][35][36]

New Jersey's Sixth Congressional District is represented by Frank Pallone (D, Long Branch).[37] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[38][39] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[40][41]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 19th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Joseph Vitale (D, Woodbridge Township) and in the General Assembly by Craig Coughlin (D, Woodbridge Township) and John Wisniewski (D, Sayreville).[42][43] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[44] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[45]

Middlesex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose seven members are elected at-large to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in January, the board selects from among its members a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director. As of 2014, Middlesex County's Freeholders (with committee chairmanship, party affiliation, residence and term-end year listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director Ronald G. Rios (Ex-officio on all committees - D, term ends December 31, 2015; Carteret),[46] Freeholder Deputy Director Carol Barrett Bellante (County Administration - D, 2014; Monmouth Junction, South Brunswick Township),[47] Kenneth Armwood (Business Development and Education - D, 2016; Piscataway),[48] Charles Kenny (Finance - D, 2016; Woodbridge Township),[49] H. James Polos (Public Safety and Health - D, 2015; Highland Park),[50] Charles E. Tomaro (Infrastructure Management - D, 2014; Edison)[51] and Blanquita B. Valenti (Community Services - D, 2016; New Brunswick).[52][53][54][55][56] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Elaine M. Flynn (D; Old Bridge Township),[57] Sheriff Mildred S. Scott (D, 2016; Piscataway)[58] and Surrogate Kevin J. Hoagland (D, 2017; New Brunswick).[53][59]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 5,457 registered voters in South Amboy, of which 2,237 (41.0%) were registered as Democrats, 612 (11.2%) were registered as Republicans and 2,605 (47.7%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[60]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 50.8% of the vote here (1,875 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 46.6% (1,722 votes) and other candidates with 1.7% (64 votes), among the 3,693 ballots cast by the city's 5,382 registered voters, for a turnout of 68.6%.[61] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 52.4% of the vote here (1,784 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 46.0% (1,566 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (37 votes), among the 3,405 ballots cast by the city's 4,971 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 68.5.[62]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 52.7% of the vote here (1,288 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 35.4% (865 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 9.2% (226 votes) and other candidates with 1.7% (41 votes), among the 2,445 ballots cast by the city's 5,298 registered voters, yielding a 46.1% turnout.[63]

Education[edit]

The South Amboy Public Schools serve students in prekindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[64]) are South Amboy Elementary School[65] (PreK-6, 649 students) and South Amboy Middle High School[66] (7-12, 508 students).[67]

Cardinal McCarrick High School (9-12), Sacred Heart Creative Kids Center (Preschool) and Sacred Heart School (K-8) operate under the supervision of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Metuchen.[68]

Transportation[edit]

The South Amboy station provides service on New Jersey Transit's North Jersey Coast Line, with most northbound trains heading to Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan and some heading to Hoboken Terminal. NJ Transit local bus service is available on the 815 and 817 routes.[69]

History[edit]

The area called "Ompoge" by Lenape Native Americans became a key port for commerce between Lower New York Bay and Philadelphia, connected first by stagecoach and eventually by railroad.[70]

Ammunition explosions[edit]

South Amboy's strategic location as a transportation hub acted to its detriment in 1918 and 1950, when the town was heavily damaged by military explosives. The 1918 explosions occurred during World War I at the Gillespie Shell Loading Plant, just west of South Amboy. The 1950 explosions struck as Healing Lighterage Company dockworkers were transferring ammunition from a freight train onto barges. Both disasters killed dozens and injured hundreds of local victims, damaged hundreds of South Amboy buildings, required emergency declarations of martial law, and scattered wide areas of ammunition remnants that continue to surface occasionally.[71][72][73][74]

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Business Administrator, City of South Amboy. Accessed November 27, 20121.
  5. ^ City Clerk, City of South Amboy. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 87.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: City of South Amboy, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for South Amboy city, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 1, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 9. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for South Amboy city, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed May 9, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for South Amboy, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed May 9, 2012.
  14. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  15. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  16. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  18. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 173. Accessed May 9, 2012.
  19. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 21, 2013.
  20. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed July 21, 2013.
  21. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 248, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 21, 2013. "South Amboy township is located on Raritan bay at the mouth of Raritan river and has a population of 4,525. This is the termination of the Camden and Amboy division of the Pennsylvania railroad. There is near this village a superior quality of clay from which stoneware is extensively manufactured."
  22. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 139. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed July 19, 2013.
  23. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  24. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  25. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 337. Accessed May 9, 2012.
  26. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed May 9, 2012.
  27. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed May 9, 2012.
  28. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for South Amboy city, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  29. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for South Amboy city, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  30. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for South Amboy city, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 9, 2012.
  31. ^ Mayor's Office, City of South Amboy. Accessed July 24, 2013.
  32. ^ City Council, City of South Amboy. Accessed July 24, 2013.
  33. ^ Durett, Jacqueline. "Applegate takes place on South Amboy council: Residents raise concerns about beach, other issues", Sayreville Suburban, July 29, 2010. Accessed May 26, 2011. "There is a new face on the South Amboy City Council. Donald Applegate, a First Ward resident, was joined by his family as he took the oath at the start of the July 21 council meeting. Mayor John O’Leary conducted the swearing-in. Applegate replaces Councilman Russell Stillwagon, who died at age 78 on June 29."
  34. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  35. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 64, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  36. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  37. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  38. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  39. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  40. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  41. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  42. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 30, 2014.
  43. ^ District 19 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 30, 2014.
  44. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  45. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  46. ^ Ronald G. Rios, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  47. ^ Carol Barrett Bellante, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  48. ^ Kenneth Armwood, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  49. ^ Charles Kenny, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  50. ^ H. James Polos, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  51. ^ Charles E. Tomaro, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  52. ^ Blanquita B. Valenti, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  53. ^ a b Elected County Officials, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  54. ^ 11/5/2013 General Election Unofficial Results, Middlesex County, November 12, 2013. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  55. ^ Staff. "Middlesex County election results 2012", NJ.com, November 6, 2012, updated November 13, 2012. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  56. ^ Staff. "Middlesex County election results 2011", The Star-Ledger, November 8, 2011. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  57. ^ County Clerk, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  58. ^ Sheriff, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  59. ^ Surrogate, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  60. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Middlesex, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  61. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Middlesex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  62. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Middlesex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  63. ^ 2009 Governor: Middlesex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  64. ^ School Data for the South Amboy Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  65. ^ South Amboy Elementary School, South Amboy Public Schools. Accessed July 24, 2013.
  66. ^ South Amboy Middle High School, South Amboy Public Schools. Accessed July 24, 2013.
  67. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the South Amboy School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed July 24, 2013.
  68. ^ Find a school, Roman Catholic Diocese of Metuchen. Accessed September 11, 2012.
  69. ^ Middlesex County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  70. ^ City History, City of South Amboy. Accessed June 1, 2014.
  71. ^ "Great Munition Plant Blown Up; 100 May Be Dead", The New York Times, October 5, 1918. Accessed June 1, 2014.
  72. ^ "Day of Explosions and Fire Finishes Shell Plant Ruin", The New York Times, October 6, 1918. Accessed June 1, 2014.
  73. ^ "Martial Law Set; Scene of the Explosion in New Jersey", The New York Times, May 20, 1950. Accessed June 1, 2014.
  74. ^ "Jersey Blast Toll 4 Dead, 22 Missing; Loss Is in Millions", The New York Times, May 21, 1950. Accessed June 1, 2014.
  75. ^ Cardinal McCarrick High School Hall of Fame, accessed April 29, 2007. "He resides in South Ambov with his wife, Fran."
  76. ^ DEREK JACOBI HAS ROLE IN BRITISH THRILLER 'DEAD AGAIN', Lexington Herald-Leader, November 22, 1991. Accessed April 29, 2007. "Evigan was born in South Amboy, N.J."
  77. ^ Harold Giles Hoffman, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed April 29, 2007.
  78. ^ Reusse, Patrick. "McKeon, young Marlins work magic.", Star Tribune, October 18, 2003. Accessed March 31, 2008. "Tom Kelly and Jack McKeon share the hometown of South Amboy, N.J."
  79. ^ Raley, Dan. "Déjà two: A half-century apart, twins light up Seattle courts", Seattle Post-Intelligencer, March 8, 2003. Accessed June 19, 2007. "The O'Briens grew up in South Amboy, N.J., mainly as baseball players. They were cut from the basketball team as sophomores and juniors at St. Mary's High School for one reason: Too darn short.... The O'Briens never made it to the NBA. They were drafted by the old Milwaukee Hawks, but turned to pro baseball instead, as infielders and part-time pitchers. Each accepted a $25,000 signing bonus from the Pittsburgh Pirates and went straight to the majors, becoming the first set of twins to play together on the same big-league team, if not appear together on the same trading card."
  80. ^ Thomas Joseph Scully, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed July 25, 2007.
  81. ^ Staff. "Two decades later, cops still suspect mother in disappearance, death of South Amboy 5-year-old", The Star-Ledger, May 23, 2011. Accessed November 27, 2012. "This week will mark the 20-year anniversary of the disappearance of Timothy Wiltsey, a 5-year-old from South Amboy whose remains were found in a marshy area 11 months after he was reported missing."

External links[edit]