List of geographic portmanteaus

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This is a list of geographic portmanteaus. Portmanteaus (also called blends) are names constructed by combining elements of two, or occasionally more, other names.

For the most part, the geographic names in this list were derived from two other names or words. Those derived from three or more names are usually considered acronyms or initialisms and can be found in the List of geographic acronyms and initialisms. However, there are exceptions to this two/three rule in both lists, so it is more of a guideline than a hard-and-fast rule.

Border portmanteaus[edit]

A border portmanteau is a name that combines those of two, or occasionally three, adjacent polities (states, provinces, counties, cities) to form a name for a region, town, or body of water on or near their mutual border.

Regions[edit]

Most of these regions are generalized areas centred on a city near a border.

Towns, villages, and localities[edit]

§ This symbol marks localities with no current population; some of them never had any population.[1]

Blends of country, state, and province names[edit]

Note: places listed on the same line are immediately across the border from each other. Some others with non-similar names are also across a border from each other.

  • § Alaflora, Alabama (Alabama and Florida) former logging town in Escambia County[1]:97
  • § Alaga, Alabama (Alabama and Georgia) town and shipping point where the Alabama Midland Railway crossed the Chattahoochee River[1]:80
  • Alcan Border, Alaska (Alaska and Canada) port of entry where the Alaska Highway (formerly the Alcan Highway) crosses into Alaska
  • Alsask, Saskatchewan (Alberta and Saskatchewan)[2]
  • Arkana, Louisiana and Arkana, Arkansas (Arkansas and Louisiana) town of some 500 people with post office (1890-1931) in Lafayette County, Arkansas and Bossier Parish, Louisiana; now reduced to a single tavern on the Louisiana side of the border[3],[1]:350
  • Arkinda, Arkansas (Arkansas and Indian Territory, now Oklahoma) former trading post with the Choctaw Nation just across the Indian Territory line[1]:372
  • § Arkla, Arkansas (Arkansas and Louisiana), former railroad stop in Chicot County[1]:309
  • § Arkmo, Missouri (Arkansas and Missouri) likely former stop on the Kennett & Osceola Railroad in Dunklin County[1]:328
  • Arkoma, Oklahoma (Arkansas and Oklahoma)[4]
  • Armorel, Arkansas (Arkansas, Missouri, and initials of Robert E. Lee Wilson)[1]:319
  • § Artex, Arkansas (Arkansas and Texas) locality and former post office about 10 miles (16 kilometers) east of Texarkana[1]:367
  • § Calada, California and Calada, Nevada (California and Nevada) originally a watering stop on the San Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt Lake Railroad, now a double siding on the Union Pacific Railroad extending over both sides of the border[5],[1]:588
  • Calexico, California (California and Mexico)[5]
  • § Calneva, California (California and Nevada) former town near Calneva Lake, east of Honey Lake[5]
  • Cal-Nev-Ari, Nevada (California, Nevada, and Arizona)[1]:597
  • § Calor, California (California and Oregon) former railroad stop in Siskiyou County, some 8 miles (13 kilometers) east of Dorris, California [5]
  • § Calor, Oregon (California and Oregon) former railroad stop on Southern Pacific's Cascade Line[6]
  • § Calvada, California (California and Nevada) former stop on the Central Pacific Railroad[1]:546
  • Calvada Springs, California (California and Nevada)[5], now known as Charleston View
  • § Calzona, California (California and Arizona) former town with a post office (1909-14) and rail depot (1909-17) on the Arizona and California Railway; site now west of Big River, California[5]
  • § Carotenn, North Carolina (North Carolina and Tennessee) another name for Lost Cove, North Carolina, a former logging town and moonshining locale, now a ghost town[1]:188
  • Carova Beach, North Carolina (North Carolina and Virginia)[1]:205
  • § Cokan, Kansas (Colorado and Kansas), community located about 2 miles (3 kilometers) east of the Colorado-Kansas line in Greeley County from the 1930s to the 1950s[7]
  • § Colmex, Colorado (Colorado and New Mexico) former Denver and Rio Grande Railroad stop in La Plata County[1]:471
  • § Colokan, Kansas (Colorado and Kansas) a short-lived (1887-1897) town half a mile east of the Colorado-Kansas border in Greeley County[1]:429
  • § Dakomin, Minnesota (South Dakota and Minnesota) former town on Lake Traverse[1]:238
  • § Dakoming, Wyoming (South Dakota and Wyoming) rail siding on the Burlington and Missouri River Railroad, now part of the BNSF Railroad[1]:442
  • Delmar, Delaware and Delmar, Maryland (Delaware and Maryland)[8]
  • Flomaton, Alabama (Florida, Alabama, plus -ton)[9]
  • Florala, Alabama (Florida and Alabama)[9]
  • § Idavada, Idaho (Idaho and Nevada) rail siding on the Oregon Short Line RR about a mile north of the Idaho-Nevada border in Twin Falls County; line now abandoned and removed[10]
  • § Idmon, Idaho (Idaho and Montana) former town in the Camas Meadows area of Clark County[10]
  • § Illiana, Illinois (Edgar County) (Illinois and Indiana) former name of Raven, Illinois[1]:283
  • Illiana, Illinois (Vermilion County) (Illinois and Indiana)[11]
  • Illiana Heights, Illinois (Illinois and Indiana)[1]:295
  • Illmo, Scott City, Missouri (Illinois and Missouri) railroad town located at the Missouri end of a rail bridge over the Mississippi River; now merged with Scott City[12]
  • § Kanado, Kansas (Kansas and Colorado), community located about 10 miles (16 kilometers) east of Colorado-Kansas line in Greeley County during the 1940s[7]
  • § Kanco, Kansas (Kansas and Colorado), current railroad stop 1.8 miles (3 kilometers) east of the Colorado-Kansas border in Greeley County[1]:429
  • Kanorado, Kansas (Kansas and Colorado) town in the middle of sunflower fields that has seen busier days[7]
  • Kenova, West Virginia (Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia)[13]
  • Kensee, Kentucky (Kentucky and Tennessee), former coal mining town in Whitley County near Jellico, Tennessee[14]
  • Kentenia, Kentucky (Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia) former coal mining town in Harlan County near the southeastern point of Kentucky[1]:155
  • Kenvir, Kentucky (Kentucky and Virginia) former coal mining town whose mineworkers engaged in the Coal Wars in Harlan County, including the Battle of Evarts[14]
  • § Laark, Louisiana (Louisiana and Arkansas), former shipping and supply point in northeastern Morehouse Parish; now a rural locality[1]:309
  • § Latex, Texas and Latex, Louisiana (Louisiana and Texas) former town on the border, in both Caddo Parish, Louisiana and Harrison County, Texas[7]
  • Latex, Texas (Panola County) (Louisiana and Texas) former name of Panola, Texas[15]
  • Mardela Springs, Maryland (Maryland and Delaware)[1]:22
  • Marvania Heights, Maryland[16] (Maryland and Pennsylvania)
  • Marydel, Delaware and Marydel, Maryland (Maryland and Delaware)
  • § Mexhoma, Oklahoma (New Mexico and Oklahoma)town along the Cimarron Route of the Santa Fe Trail; now no longer inhabited[7]
  • Mexicali, Baja California (Mexico and California)
  • Michiana, Michigan and Michiana Shores, Indiana (Michigan and Indiana)[1]:225
  • § Missala, Alabama (Mississippi and Alabama) former post office (1916-1925) serving a short-lived logging boom in Choctaw County[1]:114
  • § Missala, Mississippi (Mississippi and Alabama) former rail siding on what is now a CSX line in Jackson County[1]:122
  • Moark, Arkansas (Missouri and Arkansas) town formed when the railroad came in in the 1870s and went away when the rail did in the 1960s[1]:335
  • § Moark, Missouri (Missouri and Arkansas) former shipping point for the Missouri-Arkansas Lumber Company[17]
  • § Mokan, Missouri (Missouri and Kansas) former coal-shipping town in Bates County[1]:300
  • § Mondak, Montana and East Mondak, North Dakota (Montana and North Dakota) Wild West town providing liquor, gambling, and other adult recreations during a period when North Dakota prohibited alcohol and Montana did not; losing its raison d'etre with Prohibition, the town was abandoned and then destroyed by wildfire in the 1920s[1]:259,[18]
  • Monida, Montana (Montana and Idaho) former rail service town where the Utah and Northern Railroad crossed the Continental Divide at Monida Pass[19]
  • § Monota, Montana (Montana and North Dakota) village with post office in the early 20th century[1]:449
  • § Nevuta, Nevada[20] (Nevada and Utah)
  • Nocarva, North Carolina (North Carolina and Virginia) community of lakeside homes with private airstrip on the shore of Lake Gaston[21]
  • North Kenova, Ohio (Kentucky, Ohio, (West) Virginia)[1]:254
  • § Nosodak, North Dakota (North and South Dakota) platted, but never actually settled; town site now within Lake Oahe[18]
  • § Nypenn, New York (New York and Pennsylvania) former station on the New York, Chicago, and St. Louis Railroad south of State Line in Chautauqua County[1]:52
  • § Oklarado, Colorado (Oklahoma and Colorado) former farming community in Baca County[7]
  • § Orcal, Oregon (Oregon and California) former railroad stop on the Southern Pacific's Siskiyou Line[6]
  • § Otex, Oklahoma (Harmon County) (Oklahoma and Texas)[4]
  • § Otex, Oklahoma (Texas County) (Oklahoma and Texas) former post office just northeast of Texhoma[4]
  • Pen Mar, Maryland and Pen Mar, Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania and Maryland)[1]:45
  • Penowa, Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia) small residential community, formerly a coal mining town, in Washington County[1]:141
  • Saskalta, Alberta (Saskatchewan and Alberta), former name of Altario
  • Sylmar, Maryland and Sylmar, Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania and Maryland) former town with rail station straddling the state border near US Highway 1, now a rural area[7]
  • § Tenark, Arkansas (Tennessee and Arkansas) Union Pacific Railroad stop southwest of West Memphis, Arkansas[21]
  • § Tennelina, North Carolina (Tennessee and North Carolina) former post office on Shut-in Creek in Madison County[1]:181
  • § Tennemo, Tennessee (Tennessee and Missouri) former lumber town (saw mill and shipping point) on the Mississippi River in Dyer County[22]
  • Tennga, Georgia (Tennessee and Georgia)[23]
  • Texarkana, Texas and Texarkana, Arkansas (Texas, Arkansas, and Louisiana)
  • Texhoma, Oklahoma[4] and Texhoma, Texas[24] (Texas and Oklahoma)
  • Texico, New Mexico (Texas and New Mexico)[25]
  • Texla, Texas (Texas and Louisiana) former logging town with post office (1905-1929) in Orange County[26]
  • Texola, Oklahoma (Texas and Oklahoma), previously known as Texoma and Texokla [4]
  • § Ucolo, Utah (Utah and Colorado)[27]
  • § Urado, Utah (Utah and Colorado) former post office and school in San Juan County[1]:519
  • § Utida, Utah (Utah and Idaho) former railroad town (including maintainence shop) on the Utah Northern Railroad (now Union Pacific Railroad) in Cache County[1]:510
  • Uvada, Nevada (Utah and Nevada) ranching community in White Pine County[28]
  • § Uvada, Utah (Utah and Nevada) former rail station and siding in Iron County[1]:526
  • Vershire, Vermont (Vermont and New Hampshire)[1]:5
  • Virgilina, Virginia (Virginia and North Carolina)[29]:102
  • Vir-Mar Beach, Virginia (Virginia and Maryland)[1]:217
  • Wyocolo, Wyoming (Wyoming and Colorado)[1]:480
  • § Wyuta, Utah (Wyoming and Utah) former station on the Union Pacific Railroad in Rich and Summit Counties[1]:505

Blends of county names[edit]

Blends of town names[edit]

Bodies of water[edit]

Lakes that are on or near borders also sometimes get named with portmanteaus of the neighbouring polities.

  • Alsask Lake, Saskatchewan (Alberta and Saskatchewan)[2]
  • Arkla Lake, Arkansas[39] (Arkansas and Louisiana) Miller County, Arkansas
  • Calneva Lake, California[40] (California and Nevada) Lassen County, California
  • Lake Keomah — a man-made lake 4 miles (6 kilometers) east of Oskaloosa, Iowa named for the two counties that financed it, Keokuk and Mahaska
  • Lake Koocanusa — a reservoir named for the river it dams (Kootenay River) and the countries whose border it straddles (Canada and United States)
  • Mansask Lake[41] (Manitoba and Saskatchewan) (near Saskman Lake)[2]
  • Mantario Lake[42] (Manitoba and Ontario)
  • Mantricia Lake[43] (Manitoba and Patricia District, part of Kenora District, Ontario)[44]
  • Lake Michiana, Michigan[45] (Michigan and Indiana) Branch County, Michigan
  • Sangchris Lake (Sangamon and Christian Counties) — reservoir southeast of Springfield, Illinois
  • Saskman Lake[46] (Saskatchewan and Manitoba) (near Mansask Lake)[2]
  • Saskoba Lake[47] (Saskatchewan and Manitoba)[2]
  • Lake Talquin — Tallahassee and Quincy, Florida
  • Lake Texoma — a man-made lake on the Red River that divides Texas and Oklahoma
  • Lake Wissota — a large reservoir in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, combines Wisconsin and Minnesota.[48]

Topography[edit]

Geographic features on borders or between towns sometimes get border portmanteau names.

Other border portmanteaus[edit]

  • Canusa Street (Canada and United States) runs along the border between Beebe Plain, Vermont and Standstead, Quebec
  • Mari-Osa State Wildlife Area, Missouri (Maries and Osage Counties)[52]

Maps[edit]

Below are maps of the towns (red dots), bodies of water (blue dots), and other geographic features (green dots) that are portmanteaus of country, state, and province names. Also included are pseudo-border portmanteau towns (yellow dots).

List of geographic portmanteaus is located in Manitoba
Mansask Lake
Mansask Lake
Mantario Lake
Mantario Lake
Mantrica Lake
Mantrica Lake
Saskman Lake
Saskman Lake
Saskoba Lake
Saskoba Lake
Border portmanteaus in Manitoba
List of geographic portmanteaus is located in Alberta
Altario
Altario
Altorado
Altorado
Alsask
Alsask
Canida Peak
Canida Peak
Lake Koocanusa
Lake Koocanusa
Ukalta
Ukalta
Border portmanteaus in and near Alberta
List of geographic portmanteaus is located in Saskatchewan
Alsask
Alsask
List of geographic portmanteaus
Alsask Lake
Altario
Altario
Mankota
Mankota
Mansask Lake
Mansask Lake
Mantario
Mantario
Saskman Lake
Saskman Lake
Saskoba Lake
Saskoba Lake
Sasman No. 336
Sasman No. 336
Border portmanteaus in and near Saskatchewan
List of geographic portmanteaus is located in the US
List of geographic portmanteaus
Alaflora
Alaga
Alaga
Arizmo
Arizmo
List of geographic portmanteaus
Arkana
Arkana(Baxter County)
Arkana(Baxter County)
List of geographic portmanteaus
Arkinda
Arkla
Arkla
Arkla Lake
Arkla Lake
List of geographic portmanteaus
Arkmo
Arkoma
Arkoma
List of geographic portmanteaus
Armorel
Artex
Artex
Calada
Calada
Calexico
Calexico
Cal-Ida
Cal-Ida
Calneva
Calneva
Calneva Lake
Calneva Lake
Cal‑Nev‑Ari
Cal‑Nev‑Ari
Calor(OR)
Calor(OR)
Calor(CA)
Calor(CA)
Calvada Springs
Calvada Springs
Calzona
Calzona
Calvada
Calvada
Canida Peak
Canida Peak
Canusa Street
Canusa Street
Carotenn
Carotenn
Carova Beach
Carova Beach
Cokan/Kanado
Cokan/Kanado
Colokan/Kanco
Colokan/Kanco
Colmex
Colmex
Dakomin
Dakomin
Dakoming
Dakoming
Delmar
Delmar
Flomaton
Flomaton
Florala
Florala
Idavada
Idavada
Idmon
Idmon
Illiana (Edgar County)
Illiana (Edgar County)
Illiana(Vermilion County)
Illiana(Vermilion County)
Illiana Heights
Illiana Heights
Illmo
Illmo
Kaneb
Kaneb
Kanorado
Kanorado
Kenova/North Kenova
Kenova/North Kenova
Kensee
Kensee
Kentenia
Kentenia
Kenvir
Kenvir
Lake Koocanusa
Lake Koocanusa
Kyana
Kyana
Kymo
Kymo
Laark
Laark
Latex
Latex
List of geographic portmanteaus
Mardela Springs
Marvania Heights
Marvania Heights
Marydel
Marydel
Mexhoma
Mexhoma
Mexicali
Mexicali
Michiana/Michiana Shores
Michiana/Michiana Shores
Lake Michiana
Lake Michiana
Michillinda Lodge
Michillinda Lodge
Missala(AL)
Missala(AL)
Missala(MS)
Missala(MS)
List of geographic portmanteaus
Moark(AR)
List of geographic portmanteaus
Moark(MO)
Mokan
Mokan
Mondak
Mondak
Monida
Monida
Monida Pass
Monida Pass
Monota
Monota
Nevuta
Nevuta
Nocarva
Nocarva
Nosodak
Nosodak
Nypenn
Nypenn
Ohiowa
Ohiowa
Oklarado
Oklarado
Orcal
Orcal
Otex (Harmon County)
Otex (Harmon County)
List of geographic portmanteaus
Otex(Texas County)
Ovapa
Ovapa
Pen Mar
Pen Mar
Penowa
Penowa
Sylmar
Sylmar
Tenark
Tenark
Tennala
Tennala
Tennelina
Tennelina
Tennemo
Tennemo
Tennga
Tennga
Texarkana
Texarkana
Texhoma
Texhoma
Lake Texhoma
Lake Texhoma
Texico
Texico
Texla
Texla
Texla (Houston County)
Texla (Houston County)
Texmo
Texmo
Texola
Texola
Ucolo
Ucolo
Urado
Urado
Utida
Utida
Uvada(NV)
Uvada(NV)
Uvada(UT)
Uvada(UT)
Vershire
Vershire
Virgilina
Virgilina
Vir-Mar Beach
Vir-Mar Beach
Viropa
Viropa
Lake Wissota (village)
Lake Wissota (village)
Lake Wissota
Lake Wissota
Wyocolo
Wyocolo
Wyodak
Wyodak
Wyuta
Wyuta
Border portmanteaus in the United States
List of geographic portmanteaus is located in Alaska
Alcan Border
Alcan Border
Canalaska Mountain
Canalaska Mountain
Border portmanteaus in Alaska

Map legend:

red dot = border portmanteau towns and localities
yellow dot = pseudo-border portmanteaus
blue dot = bodies of water
green dot = other features

Pseudo-border portmanteaus[edit]

Some places have names that are blends of country, state, and provincial names. However, they are either not near their mutual border, or of regions that do not have a mutual border.

  • Altario, Alberta (Alberta and Ontario), formerly Saskalta (Saskatchewan and Alberta)[1]:148
  • Altorado, Alberta (Alberta and Colorado), named by Mormon settlers from Colorado[53]
  • Arizmo, Arizona (Arizona and Missouri), settled by people from Missouri[54]
  • Arkana, Arkansas (Baxter County) (Arkansas and Louisiana)[1]:356
  • Cal-Ida, California (California and Idaho) [1]:148
  • Delmar Boulevard (Delaware and Maryland), major street in St. Louis, Missouri; named by two early landowners along the street, one from Delaware and one from Maryland
  • Flomich, Florida (Florida and Michigan), founder being a native of Michigan[7]
  • § Kaneb, Nebrasks (Kansas and Nebraska), BNSF Railway stop in Fillmore County[21]
  • Kyana, Indiana (Kentucky and Indiana)[1]:147
  • § Kymo, Arizona (Kentucky and Missouri), first settlers were two families, one from each state[54]
  • Lake Wissota, Wisconsin (Wisconsin and Minnesota), town on the lake, also known as Lake Wissota Village
  • Mankota, Saskatchewan (Manitoba and North Dakota), original homes of the settlers[2]
  • Mantario, Saskatchewan (Manitoba and Ontario), named after two provinces in imitation of nearby Alsask[2]
  • Michillinda Lodge, Michigan (Michigan, Illinois, and Indiana)[1]:148
  • Ohiowa, Nebraska (Ohio and Iowa), settled by people from both states.[55]
  • Ovapa, West Virginia (Ohio, Virginia, Pennsylvania)[13]:465
  • Sasman No. 336, Saskatchewan (Saskatchewan and Manitoba), Regional Municipality, the equivalent of a county[2]
  • Tennala, Alabama (Tennessee and Alabama)[1]:149
  • Texla, Texas (Houston County) (Texas and Louisiana) not near Houston, but also not near the Louisiana border[56]
  • Texmo, Oklahoma (Texas and Missouri) settlers from Missouri[4]
  • Ukalta, Alberta (Ukraine and Alberta)[1]:148
  • § Viropa, West Virginia (Virginia, Ohio, Pennsylvania)[13]:650
  • Wyodak, Wyoming (Wyoming and South Dakota)[1]:443

From personal names[edit]

Most here are blends of two personal names, but some are of a personal name with some other name or word.

Merged towns[edit]

Sometimes a portmanteau name is created from the names of predecessor towns. Names that are merely a concatenation of the predecessor names, such as Budapest, are excluded.

Livestock[edit]

  • Bimble, Kentucky — Bim and Bill, two oxen owned by Will Payne, first postmaster[14]
  • Clemretta, British Columbia[94] — Clementine and Henrietta, two cows owned by the first postmaster[91]

Other portmanteaus[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd Temple, Robert D. (2009). Edge Effects: the Border-Name Places (2nd ed.). Bloomington, Indiana: iUniverse, Inc. ISBN 978-0-595-47758-6.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an Barry, Bill (September 2005). Geographic Names of Saskatchewan. Regina, Saskatchewan: People Places Publishing, Ltd. ISBN 1-897010-19-2.
  3. ^ a b c d D'Artois Leeper, Clare (2012). Louisiana Place Names: Popular, Unusual, and Forgotten Stories of Towns, Cities, Plantations, Bayous, and Even Some Cemeteries. LSU Press. ISBN 9780807147382.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Shirk, George H, (1987). Oklahoma Place Names. University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 0-8061-2028-2.
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  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l McArthur, Lewis A.; McArthur, Lewis L. (1992). Oregon Geographic Names (6th ed.). Oregon Historical Society Press. ISBN 0-87595-237-2.
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  11. ^ a b c d Callary, Edward (October 2009). Place Names of Illinois. Champaign, Illinois: University of Illinois Press. ISBN 978-0-252-03356-8.
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  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Kenny, Hamill (1945). West Virginia Place Names: Their Origin and Meaning, Including the Nomenclature of the Streams and Mountains. Piedmont, WV: The Place Name Press.
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  40. ^ "Calneva Lake". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  41. ^ "Mansask Lake". Geographical Names Data Base. Natural Resources Canada.
  42. ^ "Mantario Lake". Geographical Names Data Base. Natural Resources Canada.
  43. ^ "Manticia Lake". Geographical Names Data Base. Natural Resources Canada.
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