Bhandara district

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This article is about the district. For its eponymous headquarters, see Bhandara.
Bhandara district
भंडारा जिल्हा
District of Maharashtra
Location of Bhandara district in Maharashtra
Location of Bhandara district in Maharashtra
Country India
State Maharashtra
Administrative division Nagpur Division
Headquarters Bhandara
Tehsils 1. Bhandara, 2. Tumsar, 3. Pauni and 4. Mohadi, 5. Sakoli, 6. Lakhni, 7. Lakhandur
Government
 • Lok Sabha constituencies Bhandara-Gondiya (shared with Gondia district)
 • Assembly seats 3
Area
 • Total 4,087 km2 (1,578 sq mi)
Population (2011)
 • Total 1,200,334
 • Density 290/km2 (760/sq mi)
 • Urban 19.48%
Major highways NH-6
Average annual precipitation 1327 mm
Website Official website

Bhandara District (Marathi: भंडारा जिल्हा) is an administrative district in the state of Maharashtra in India. The district headquarters are located at Bhandara. The district occupies an area of 4087 km² and has a population of 1,200,334 (male 605,520 female 594,814) of which 19.48% are urban (as of 2011).[1] It is fondly called as the 'District of Lakes'or 'Brass city'. Bhandara has a mixed economy with agriculture, industries and forest resources contributing to it. Bhandara is known for its large production of rice. Tumsar, a tahsil town, is a famous rice market. Bhandara town is also known as 'Brass City' owing to the presence of a large brass products industry. Bhandara has no shortage of tourism spots with several important destinations like Ambagad Fort, Brahmi, Chinchgad, Dighodi etc.

The district is also famous for the Ordnance Factory Bhandara of the Ordnance Factories Board which manufactures products for the Indian Armed Forces. Estate which is popularly known as Jawaharnagar colony. The beautiful colony has 2 schools, Kendriya Vidyalaya Bhandra and Ordnance Factory State School. This is the only Kendriya Vidyalaya in the Bhandara district. There is one Navodaya Vidyalaya (brain child of Late Primeminister Rajiv Gandhi) in Navegoan Bandh. Ashok Leyland, a Hinduja Group Company, has a production facility at Gadegaon near Bhandara. Sunflag Iron Steel company and Shivmangal Ispat Pvt. Ltd. are other major industrial undertakings in the district.

The most famous politician of this district is Praful Patel from Gondia (now a separate district), who was previously minister for Civil Aviation in the UPA government but now is the cabinet minister for heavy industries. Korambi, about 8 km from Bhandara town, is a popular tourist attraction, especially in winter. The devi temple on the hill and the Wainganga River flowing on one side of it is another scenic location at Korambhi.

History[edit]

The region to the south of the Godavari was inhabited by the aborigines, who are called Rakshasas in the Ramayana where the region is mentioned. Initially the district was included in the seventh century in the territories of the Haihaya Rajput kings of Chhattisgarh whose kingdom was known as Maha Kosala.umesh kachhawh Bhandara retains some recollection of Hindu kings who ruled from Nagardhan.

The 12th century saw the rule of Ponwars who were subsequently ousted by Gond chiefs who asserted their independence of the Ratanpur dynasty. This was followed by Raghoji Bhonsle of Satara who established himself as the king of Vidarbha in 1743. In 1755, Janoji was declared as the sovereign of the territory, after the death of his father Raghoji Bhonsle. The two brothers Mudhoji and Rupaji of Raghoji Bhonsle of Hingani-Beradi were contemporaries of Shahaji, the father of Chhatrapati Shivaji and one of the ancestors of the Bhonsles of Nagpur who rehabilitated the village of Beradi was probably the contemporary of Maloji, the grandfather of Chhatrapati Shivaji. After the death of Sambhaji, during the Mughal-Maratha conflict, Parasoji rendered invaluable help to Rajaram who had succeeded to the throne of Chhatrapati. The territories of Vidarbha and Berar from which he had exacted tribute were given to his charge under a grant made in A.D. 1699.

In 1707 after the death of Aurangzeb when Chhattrapati Shahu was released by Muhammad Azam, Parasoji Bhonsle was the first of the Maratha nobles to join him in west Khandesh.

The 17th century saw the invasion of the Peshwas who were instrumental in making the district a part of Berar. The Peshwas were succeeded by the Nizams during the 1850s; the Nizam ceded Berar to the British East India Company. In 1903 the Nizam leased Berar to the British Government of India. It was transferred to the Central Provinces. In 1956, with the re-organization of states, Bhandara was transferred from Madhya Pradesh to Bombay Province and in 1960 with the formation of Maharashtra; it became a district of the state. After the 1991 Census the district was bifurcated into Bhandara and Gondiya or Gondia.

The Mauryas, Satavahanas, Chalukyas,

Rashtrakutas, Vakatakas, the shepherd kings, Rajput dynasties, the Rashtrika-Petenikas, the Bhoja-Petenikas, the Ponwars, Deogarh Gond kingdom, Peshwa, Marathas, Bhonsles, Pandaris, Mughals, Lanji dynasty, Nizam, British, etc.

The place is famous for its rice production. Bhandara town is also known as 'Brass City' owing to the presence of a large brass products industry.

Chakradhara, Maharaja Svamidasa, Maharaja Bhulunda, Maharaja Rhudradasa, Rudrasena I, Prithivishena I, Vikramaditya, Harisena, King Mangalesha, Shankaragana, Durgaraja, Govindaraja, Svamikaraja, Nannaraja alias Yuddhasura, Kanhoji Bhonsle, Ranoji Bhonsle, Fatehsingh Bhonsle, Bajirav Bhonsle, Raghoji Bhonsle, Janoji, Mudhoji, Chand Sultan, Raghunath Singh, Wali Shah, Akbar Shah and Burhan Shah, Balaji Bajirav, Aurangzeb, Shuja Khan, Sarfaraz Khan, etc.

The region to the south of the Godavari was inhabited by the aborigines, who are called Rakshasas in the Ramayana where the region is mentioned. Initially the district was included in the seventh century in the territories of the Haihaya Rajput kings of Chhattisgarh whose kingdom was known as Maha Kosala. Bhandara retains some recollection of Hindu kings who ruled from Nagardhan. The 12th century saw the rule of Ponwars who were subsequently ousted by Gond chiefs who asserted their independence of the Ratanpur dynasty. This was followed by Raghoji Bhonsle of Satara who established himself as the king of Vidarbha in 1743. In 1755, Janoji was declared as the sovereign of the territory, after the death of his father Raghoji Bhonsle. The two brothers Mudhoji and Rupaji of Raghoji Bhonsle of Hingani-Beradi were contemporaries of Shahaji, the father of Chhatrapati Shivaji and one of the ancestors of the Bhonsles of Nagpur who rehabilitated the village of Beradi was probably the contemporary of Maloji, the grandfather of Chhatrapati Shivaji. After the death of Sambhaji, during the Mughal-Maratha conflict, Parasoji rendered invaluable help to Rajaram who had succeeded to the throne of Chhatrapati. The territories of Vidarbha and Berar from which he had exacted tribute were given to his charge under a grant made in 1699 A.D.

In 1707 after the death of Aurangzeb when Shahu was released by Muhammad Azam, Parasoji Bhonsle was the first of the Maratha nobles to join him in west Khandesh.

The 17th century saw the invasion of the Peshwas who were instrumental in making the district a part of Berar. The Peshwas were succeeded by the Nizams during the 1850s; the Nizam ceded Berar to the British East India Company. In 1903 the Nizam leased Berar to the British Government of India. It was transferred to the Central Provinces. In 1956, with the re-organization of states, Bhandara was transferred from Madhya Pradesh to Bombay Province and in 1960 with the formation of Maharashtra; it became a district of the state. After the 1991 Census the district was bifurcated into Bhandara and Gondiya or Gondia.

Bhandara is one of the major administrative districts in Maharashtra, and is located in the Nagpur division at 21°10'N 79°39'E. The district is enveloped by Balaghat district (Madhya Pradesh) in the north and Chandrapur in the south, while Gondia and Nagpur mark its eastern and western borders, respectively. Covering an area of 3716 km2, the district of Bhandara is segregated into two sub-divisions, namely Bhandara and Sakoli that are further divided into seven talukas.

The name of the district Bhandara is derived from 'Bhannara', the name by which it is mentioned in a stone inscription at Ratanpur.The excavation confirms that the existence of Bhandara dates back to the 11th century, at the region to the south of Godavari that was inhabited by the aborigines (Rakshasas). Formerly a part of the territories of the Haihaya Rajput kings of Chhattisgarh, Bhandara was taken over by the Ponwars in the 12th century, followed by the Gond chiefs.

By the 17th century, the district was made a part of Berar by Peshwas, who had invaded the region during the period. In 1699, the region came under the control of Parasoji Bhonsle along with the territories of Vidarbha and Berar. Raghoji Bhonsle of Vidarbha took over the charge in 1743, and was preceded by his son Janoji after his death in 1755. The feudal dynasty of Lanji governed the region from 1818 to 1830, and formed the Bhandara district in 1821.

Peshwas were ousted by Nizams during the 1850s, who ceded Berar to the British East India Company in 1903. With the re-organisation of states in 1956, Bhandara was transferred to Bombay Province from the state of Madhya Pradesh. After the formation of Maharashtra in 1960, Bhandara evolved as a district of the state. The erstwhile Bhandara district was bifurcated on 1 May 1999, and a new district, Gondia was formed. Thus, Gondia and Bhandara came into existence.

The current name of Bhandara, is derived from the term 'bhana' meaning 'brass', as the town is dominated by brass-working industry. With more than 3500 small lakes in and around the district, this 'Brass City' is also referred to as the 'District of Lakes'. It is characteristic of a mixed economy with agriculture, industries and forest resources contributing to it. Bhandara district is mainly popular for its large production of rice, and is thus termed as the 'rice bowl of Maharashtra'.

Marathi is the chief language spoken in this district, in the northeast of state. Though dotted with a number of industries like Ashok Leyland, Sunflag Steel and Ordnance Factory, Bhandara offers ample opportunities for sightseeing with attractions like Ambagad Fort, Brahmi, Chinchgad and Dighodi. It also hosts two main fairs, namely Khandoba (November to December) and Maha Shivaratri (January to February), along with other festivals held at Ashti and Dhapewada.

With several ancient temples and historical monuments, along with beautiful lakes, parks and sanctuaries, Bhandara attracts plenty of tourists every year. The ideal time to visit this Maharashtrian district is in the months of October and November. The nearest air gateway to Bhandara is located 60 km away, in Nagpur. Rail links Bhandara to other cities with stations at Bhandara Road and Tumsar Road. Buses and other road transport travelling towards Bhandara ply on NH 6.

Economy[edit]

In 2006 the Ministry of Panchayati Raj named Bhandara one of the country's 250 most backward districts (out of a total of 640).[2] It is one of the twelve districts in Maharashtra currently receiving funds from the Backward Regions Grant Fund Programme (BRGF).[2]

Divisions[edit]

Bhandara district consists two sub-divisions, which are further divided into seven talukas. Bhandara sub-division is divided into four talukas: Bhandara, Tumsar, Pauni and Mohadi. Sakoli sub-division is divided into three talukas: Sakoli, Lakhani, and Lakhandur.

Language, People & Culture.[edit]

98% people of whole population are Marathi (|Local Marathi) Speaking. Bhandara well known for Dramas (|Local Natak)

People & Culture Bhandara

The Bhandara city contains a large number of people from other Indian states as well as people belonging to the world's major faiths.

A number of newspapers are published from Bhandara in English, Hindi and Marathi. The Hitavada is one of the oldest English daily newspaper published in central India(Published from Nagpur). Times of India Bhandara Edition has been active since few years now (Bhandara Times). Many leading Hindi dailies have their offices in Bhandara. Bhandara is known for staying calm during communal conflicts in India. S Several important religious events are observed in the city throughout the year.

There are three Vidhan Sabha constituencies in this district: Tumsar, Bhandara (SC) and Sakoli. All of these are part of Bhandara-Gondiya Lok Sabha constiteuncy.[3]

Demographics[edit]

According to the 2011 census Bhandara district has a population of 1,200,334,[4] roughly equal to the nation of Timor-Leste[5] or the US state of Rhode Island.[6] This gives it a ranking of 397th in India (out of a total of 640).[4] The district has a population density of 294 inhabitants per square kilometre (760 /sq mi) .[4] Its population growth rate over the decade 2001-2011 was 5.65%.[4] Bhandara has a sex ratio of 982 females for every 1000 males,[4] and a literacy rate of 83.76%.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ a b Ministry of Panchayati Raj (September 8, 2009). "A Note on the Backward Regions Grant Fund Programme". National Institute of Rural Development. Retrieved September 27, 2011. 
  3. ^ "Districtwise List of Assembly and Parliamentary Constituencies". Chief Electoral Officer, Maharashtra website. Archived from the original on 25 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-03-31. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f "District Census 2011". Census2011.co.in. 2011. Retrieved 2011-09-30. 
  5. ^ US Directorate of Intelligence. "Country Comparison:Population". Retrieved 2011-10-01. "Timor-Leste 1,177,834 July 2011 est." 
  6. ^ "2010 Resident Population Data". U. S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-09-30. "Rhode Island 1,052,567" 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 21°11′N 80°00′E / 21.183°N 80.000°E / 21.183; 80.000