Psalm 31

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Psalm 31 is the 31st psalm of the Book of Psalms.

Charles and Emilie Briggs summarized the contents of Psalm 31 in the International Critical Commentary series: "Ps. 31 is a prayer: (1) importunate plea for deliverance of the people from national enemies (v.2-5); (2) confidence in the deliverance already accomplished (v.6-9); (3) petition based on complain of abandonment (v.10-13); (4) confidence, with prayer for salvation (v.14-17); (5) praise of Yahweh for the salvation (v.20-21, 22-24a). There are liturgical glosses (v.22, 24b-25) and a gloss of imprecation (v.18-19)."[1]

On the basis of the wording of the Psalm, they claim that "The author certainly knew Jer[emiah], Is[aiah], Ez[ekiel], and many Ps[alms] of the Persian period. We cannot put the composition earlier than the troubles of Israel preceding the reforms of Nehemiah."[2] The Persian period began in 539 BC, and Nehemiah's reforms are dated to about 445 BC.[3][4]


Felix Mendelssohn set it to music a capella in English,[5] using the King James Version.[citation needed]

Uses[edit]

Judaism[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Charles Augustus Briggs; Emilie Grace Briggs (1960) [1906]. A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Book of Psalms. International Critical Commentary. 1. Edinburgh: T & T Clark. p. 263. 
  2. ^ Charles Augustus Briggs; Emilie Grace Briggs (1960) [1906]. A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Book of Psalms. International Critical Commentary. 1. Edinburgh: T & T Clark. p. 264. 
  3. ^ Lisa M. Wolfe (1 November 2011). Ruth, Esther, Song of Songs, and Judith. Wipf and Stock Publishers. p. 60. ISBN 978-1-60608-520-2. . . . the Persian period, which began in 539 King Cyrus of Persia conquered ancient Babylonia. 
  4. ^ F. Charles Fensham (24 February 1983). The Books of Ezra and Nehemiah. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing. p. 7. ISBN 978-0-8028-2527-8. Nehemiah arrived in Jerusalem in 445 as governor of Judah . . . 
  5. ^ p. 234, Reichwald (2008) Siegwart. Bloomington, Indiana Mendelssohn in Performance Indiana University Press
  6. ^ The Complete Artscroll Siddur page 265
  7. ^ The Complete Artscroll Siddur page 293