Hightstown, New Jersey

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Hightstown, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Hightstown
Hightstown highlighted in Mercer County. Inset map: Mercer County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Hightstown highlighted in Mercer County. Inset map: Mercer County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Hightstown, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hightstown, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°16′06″N 74°31′33″W / 40.268457°N 74.525804°W / 40.268457; -74.525804Coordinates: 40°16′06″N 74°31′33″W / 40.268457°N 74.525804°W / 40.268457; -74.525804[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Mercer
Incorporated March 5, 1853
Government[6]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Steven Kirson (D, term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Administrator Henry Underhill[4]
 • Clerk Debra Sopronyi[5]
Area[1]
 • Total 1.242 sq mi (3.218 km2)
 • Land 1.211 sq mi (3.137 km2)
 • Water 0.031 sq mi (0.081 km2)  2.52%
Area rank 480th of 566 in state
11th of 13 in county[1]
Elevation[7] 92 ft (28 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 5,494
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 5,567
 • Rank 365th of 566 in state
11th of 13 in county[12]
 • Density 4,536.0/sq mi (1,751.4/km2)
 • Density rank 125th of 566 in state
3rd of 13 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08520[13][14]
Area code(s) 609[15]
FIPS code 3402131620[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885254[1][18]
Website www.hightstownborough.com

Hightstown is a borough in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 5,494,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 278 (+5.3%) from the 5,216 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 90 (+1.8%) from the 5,126 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Hightstown was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 5, 1853, within portions of East Windsor Township. The borough became fully independent c. 1894. Additional portions of East Windsor Township were annexed in 1913, 1915 and 1927.[20] It was named for the Hight family.[21]

Geography[edit]

Hightstown is located at 40°16′06″N 74°31′33″W / 40.268457°N 74.525804°W / 40.268457; -74.525804 (40.268457, −74.525804). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.242 square miles (3.218 km2), of which, 1.211 square miles (3.137 km2) of it was land and 0.031 square miles (0.081 km2) of it (2.52%) of it was water.[1][2]

The borough is an independent municipality surrounded entirely by East Windsor Township. Hightstown is at the central-most point of New Jersey and is roughly equidistant from Philadelphia and New York City.

Climate[edit]

The record low was −16 °F (−27 °C) on January 28, 1935. The record high was 105 °F (41 °C) on July 9, 1936.[22]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 970
1870 1,347 38.9%
1880 1,355 0.6%
1890 1,875 38.4%
1900 1,749 −6.7%
1910 1,879 7.4%
1920 2,674 42.3%
1930 3,012 12.6%
1940 3,486 15.7%
1950 3,712 6.5%
1960 4,317 16.3%
1970 5,431 25.8%
1980 4,581 −15.7%
1990 5,126 11.9%
2000 5,216 1.8%
2010 5,494 5.3%
Est. 2013 5,567 [11] 1.3%
Population sources:1860-1920[24]
1870[25] 1880-1890[26]
1890-1910[27] 1910-1930[28]
1930-1990[29] 2000[30][31] 2010[8][9][10]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 5,494 people, 1,976 households, and 1,352 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,536.0 per square mile (1,751.4/km2). There were 2,108 housing units at an average density of 1,740.4 per square mile (672.0/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 69.44% (3,815) White, 8.05% (442) Black or African American, 0.56% (31) Native American, 4.08% (224) Asian, 0.15% (8) Pacific Islander, 13.56% (745) from other races, and 4.17% (229) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 30.29% (1,664) of the population.[8]

There were 1,976 households, of which 32.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.2% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.6% were non-families. 24.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.23.[8]

In the borough, 23.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.6% from 18 to 24, 31.1% from 25 to 44, 26.7% from 45 to 64, and 9.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36.9 years. For every 100 females there were 99.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.1 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $66,250 (with a margin of error of ± $8,281) and the median family income was $72,583 (± $13,355). Males had a median income of $49,861 (± $9,561) versus $42,361 (± $14,837) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $32,976 (± $3,402). About 8.2% of families and 8.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.2% of those under age 18 and 1.1% of those age 65 or over.[32]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 5,216 people, 2,001 households, and 1,300 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,251.9 people per square mile (1,637.3/km2). There were 2,081 housing units at an average density of 1,696.4 per square mile (653.2/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 76.53% White, 8.51% African American, 0.36% Native American, 2.28% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 9.64% from other races, and 2.59% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 20.05% of the population.[30][31]

There were 2,001 households out of which 30.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.7% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.0% were non-families. 27.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.15.[30][31]

In the borough the population was spread out with 22.5% under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 36.8% from 25 to 44, 21.9% from 45 to 64, and 10.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 103.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.2 males.[30][31]

The median income for a household in the borough was $64,299, and the median income for a family was $72,092. Males had a median income of $46,375 versus $35,428 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $28,605. About 4.3% of families and 7.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.1% of those under age 18 and 4.4% of those age 65 or over.[30][31]

As of the 2000 Census, 6.31% of Hightstown's residents identified themselves as being of Ecuadorian ancestry, which was the second highest of any municipality in New Jersey and the sixth highest percentage of Ecuadorian people in any place in the United States with 1,000 or more residents identifying their ancestry.[33]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Hightstown is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[6] The Borough form of government used by Hightstown, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[34][35]

As of 2014, the Mayor of the Borough of Hightstown is Democrat Steven Kirson, whose term of office ends on December 31, 2014.[36] Borough Council members are Council President Susan Bluth (D, 2014), Denise "Denny" Hansen (D, 2016), Seth A. Kurs (D, November 2014; serving an unexpired term), Steven Misiura (D, 2016), Lawrence D. Quattrone (D, 2015) and Robert Thibault (D, 2014).[37][38][39]

Seth Kurs was appointed in April 2014 from among three prospective candidatess to fill the vacant seat of Gail Doran, who had resigned earlier in the month, citing personal reasons. Kurs will serve until the November 2014 general election, when voters will elect a representative to serve the balance of the term expiring in 2015.[40]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Hightstown is located in the 12th Congressional District[41] and is part of New Jersey's 14th state legislative district.[9][42][43] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Hightstown had been in the 12th state legislative district.[44] Prior to the 2010 Census, Hightstown had been part of the 4th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[44]

New Jersey's Twelfth Congressional District is represented by Rush D. Holt, Jr. (D, Hopewell Township).[45] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[46][47] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[48][49]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 14th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Linda R. Greenstein (D, Plainsboro Township) and in the General Assembly by Daniel R. Benson (D, Hamilton Township, Mercer County) and Wayne DeAngelo (D, Hamilton Township).[50][51] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[52] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[53]

Mercer County is governed by a County Executive who oversees the day-to-day operations of the county and by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders that acts in a legislative capacity, setting policy. All officials are chosen at-large in partisan elections, with the executive serving a four-year term of office while the freeholders serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats up for election each year.[54] As of 2014, the County Executive is Brian M. Hughes (D, term ends December 31, 2015; Princeton).[55] Mercer County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chair Andrew Koontz (D, 2016; Princeton),[56] Freeholder Vice Chair Samuel T. Frisby, Sr. (2015; Trenton),[57] Ann M. Cannon (2015; East Windsor Township),[58] Anthony P. Carabelli (2016; Trenton),[59] John A. Cimino (2014, Hamilton Township),[60] Pasquale "Pat" Colavita, Jr. (2015; Lawrence Township)[61] and Lucylle R. S. Walter (2014; Ewing Township)[62][63][64] Mercer County's constitutional officers are County Clerk Paula Sollami-Covello (D, 2015),[65] Sheriff John A. Kemler (D, 2014)[66] and Surrogate Diane Gerofsky (D, 2016).[67][39]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 2,891 registered voters in Hightstown, of which 1,105 (38.2%) were registered as Democrats, 542 (18.7%) were registered as Republicans and 1,241 (42.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[68]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 66.8% of the vote here (1,504 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 30.4% (685 votes) and other candidates with 1.6% (36 votes), among the 2,253 ballots cast by the borough's 2,962 registered voters, for a turnout of 76.1%.[69] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 59.3% of the vote here (1,254 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 36.4% (771 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (25 votes), among the 2,116 ballots cast by the borough's 2,776 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 76.2.[70]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 46.2% of the vote here (700 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 44.8% (679 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 7.1% (107 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (16 votes), among the 1,514 ballots cast by the borough's 2,908 registered voters, yielding a 52.1% turnout.[71]

Education[edit]

Students in public school for pre-Kindergarten through twelfth grade attend the East Windsor Regional School District, a comprehensive public school district serving students from East Windsor Township and Hightstown Borough. Public school students in seventh through twelfth grades from Roosevelt Borough (a community in Monmouth County that had a 2010 Census population of 882) are sent to the district's schools as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Roosevelt Public School District.[72]

As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's six schools had an enrollment of 5,054 students and 373.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.53:1.[73] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics.[74]) are Walter C. Black Elementary School[75] (525 students; in grades K-5), Perry L. Drew Elementary School[76] (558; K-5), Ethel McKnight Elementary School[77] (636; K-5), Grace N. Rogers Elementary School[78] (699; PreK-5), Melvin H. Kreps Middle School[79] grades 6 - 8 with 1,233 students and Hightstown High School[80] with 1,403 students in grades 9 - 12.[81][82]

Hightstown is also home to the Peddie School, a coeducational, independent high school founded in 1864.[83]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

Hightstown is located at the cross-roads of several major roads. The main highway through the borough is Route 33 (which is also multiplexed with County Route 539 and County Route 571). U.S. Route 130 just barely passes through the northwest corner, but is usually accessible by Route 33, CR 571 and CR 539. The Hightstown Bypass is north of the borough. Hightstown is also immediately adjacent to Exit 8 of the New Jersey Turnpike (Interstate 95) in East Windsor.

As of 2010, the borough had a total of 16.74 miles (26.94 km) of roadways, of which 12.70 miles (20.44 km) were maintained by the municipality, 2.74 miles (4.41 km) by Mercer County and 1.30 miles (2.09 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[84]

The history of the Hightstown Bypass dates back to when it was originally planned as Route 92. Running from Route 33, it would have crossed U.S. Route 130 and traveled northwest to a proposed interchange with the then-proposed Somerset Freeway. Decades of lengthy battles resulted in both plans being canceled, and the only surviving section was the bypass of Hightstown itself. This freeway, which opened to the public in November 1999, was ultimately given the designation of Route 133 and runs from CR 571 to Route 33.[85] It only has two interchanges and has traffic signals at both ends. Without a proper connection to the New Jersey Turnpike, the bypass has not lived up to its original expectations and congestion through Hightstown still largely remains. However with the widening of the Turnpike, Exit 8 was relocated from its original location (immediately at the border of Hightstown) further into East Windsor near Twin Rivers that connects directly to the end point of Route 133 with a grade-separated interchange along Route 33 that was completed in September 2013.[86] This connection was to encourage Turnpike traffic to use the bypass by giving a more direct route to other parts of the region, such as Princeton, and having to avoid downtown Hightstown. Discussions have been made of potentially extending the bypass further south to provide a connection with U.S. Route 130 south of Hightstown, however this section would more than likely carry the Route 33 designation.

Public transportation[edit]

Public transportation is provided by the Route 130 Connection shuttle,[87] as well as the Princeton Junction Shuttle.[88]

There is also direct service to New York, as well as other New Jersey communities on the Suburban Coach route 300 to the Port Authority Bus Terminal, Grand Central Terminal and other destinations in Midtown Manhattan and the 600 route to Downtown Manhattan / Wall Street.[89]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Hightstown include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Borough Administrator, Borough of Hightstown. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  5. ^ Clerk's Office, Borough of Hightstown. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 63.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Hightstown, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Hightstown borough, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 14, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 7. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Hightstown borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed March 14, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Hightstown, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed March 14, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NX for Hightstown, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  16. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
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  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 162. Accessed March 14, 2012.
  21. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 156. 
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  25. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  26. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 98. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  27. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 337. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  28. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 716. Accessed March 14, 2012.
  29. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed March 14, 2012.
  30. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Hightstown borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  31. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Hightstown borough, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  32. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Hightstown borough, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 14, 2012.
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  40. ^ Clerkin, Bridget. "Hightstown fills vacant borough council seat with local lawyer", The Times (Trenton), April 29, 2014. Accessed September 4, 2014. "Local attorney Seth Kurs will fill the vacancy created by an unexpected resignation from the Hightstown Borough Council.Kurs was sworn in by the council Monday night to occupy the seat left open by Gail Doran, who submitted her letter of resignation on April 7."
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  55. ^ Brian M. Hughes, County Executive, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  56. ^ Andrew Koontz, Mercer County. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  57. ^ Samuel T. Frisby, Sr., Mercer County. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  58. ^ Ann M. Cannon, Mercer County. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  59. ^ Anthony P. Carabelli, Mercer County. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  60. ^ John A. Cimono, Mercer County. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  61. ^ Pasquale "Pat" Colavita, Jr., Mercer County. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  62. ^ Lucylle R. S. Walter, Mercer County. Accessed September 6, 2014.
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  72. ^ East Windsor Regional School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 4, 2014. "The East Windsor Regional School District, located in central New Jersey at New Jersey Turnpike Exit 8, is a stable K-12 public school district serving the communities of the East Windsor Township and the Borough of Hightstown as well as Roosevelt Borough students’ grades 7 through 12."
  73. ^ District information for East Windsor Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  74. ^ School Data for the East Windsor Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  75. ^ Walter C. Black Elementary School, East Windsor Regional School District. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  76. ^ Perry L. Drew Elementary School, East Windsor Regional School District. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  77. ^ Ethel McKnight Elementary School, East Windsor Regional School District. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  78. ^ Grace N. Rogers Elementary School, East Windsor Regional School District. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  79. ^ Melvin H. Kreps Middle School, East Windsor Regional School District. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  80. ^ Hightstown High School, East Windsor Regional School District. Accessed September 4, 2014.
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  82. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the East Windsor Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  83. ^ History, Peddie School. Accessed March 14, 2012.
  84. ^ Mercer County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  85. ^ Hightstown Bypass opened to traffic, New Jersey Department of Transportation press release, November 29, 1999. Accessed September 4, 2014. "The Hightstown Bypass is a 3.8 mile, four lane freeway that connects Route 571 to Route 33 in a northerly alignment around the Borough of Hightstown. The project is located in East Windsor Township."
  86. ^ New Route 133 bridge over Route 33opened in East Windsor; New Jersey Turnpike widening contract includes reconfiguration of Interchange 8, New Jersey Department of Transportation press release, September 17, 2013. Accessed September 4, 2014. "NJDOT and New Jersey Turnpike Authority (NJTA) officials today announced that a new Route 133/Hightstown Bypass bridge over Route 33 has been opened to traffic east of the New Jersey Turnpike Interchange 8 in East Windsor, Mercer County.... The new Route 133 bridge was built to support a grade separated, direct connection (or single-point interchange) from Route 33 to the new Interchange 8 Toll Plaza complete with new access ramps."
  87. ^ Rt. 130 Connections Shuttle Service, East Windsor Township. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  88. ^ Princeton Junction Shuttle, East Windsor Township. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  89. ^ Available schedules from Hightstown, NJ to New York, NY., Coach USA. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  90. ^ Van Gelder, Lawrence. "Kay B. Barrett, Talent Scout And Entertainment Agent, 93", The New York Times, January 19, 1995. Accessed December 3, 2012. "Kay Brown Barrett, who bought Gone With the Wind for the movie producer David O. Selznick after discovering the novel as his New York representative, died yesterday at the Meadow Lakes retirement community in Hightstown, N.J., where she had lived for the last 14 years. She was 93."
  91. ^ Sisario, Ben. "Hilly Kristal, 75, Catalyst for Punk at CBGB, Dies", The New York Times, August 30, 2007. Accessed August 17, 2013. "Hillel Kristal grew up on a farm in Hightstown, N.J., and studied classical violin as a child."
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