Lebanon Township, New Jersey

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This article is about the Township in Hunterdon County. For the Borough, see Lebanon, New Jersey.
Lebanon Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Lebanon
Map of Lebanon Township in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Lebanon Township in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Lebanon Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Lebanon Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°43′35″N 74°53′40″W / 40.726368°N 74.894441°W / 40.726368; -74.894441Coordinates: 40°43′35″N 74°53′40″W / 40.726368°N 74.894441°W / 40.726368; -74.894441[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Hunterdon
First mention October 26, 1731
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Government[5]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Thomas McKee (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Clerk Karen Sandorse[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 31.696 sq mi (82.092 km2)
 • Land 31.458 sq mi (81.476 km2)
 • Water 0.238 sq mi (0.616 km2)  0.75%
Area rank 82nd of 566 in state
7th of 26 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 925 ft (282 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 6,588
 • Estimate (2012[10]) 6,474
 • Rank 326th of 566 in state
4th of 26 in county[11]
 • Density 209.4/sq mi (80.8/km2)
 • Density rank 503rd of 566 in state
18th of 26 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07830 - Califon[12]
08826 - Glen Gardner[13]
Area code(s) 908
FIPS code 3401939660[14][2][15]
GNIS feature ID 0882191[16][2]
Website www.lebanontownship.net

Lebanon Township is a township located at the northernmost point of Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 6,588,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 772 (+13.3%) from the 5,816 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 137 (+2.4%) from the 5,679 counted in the 1990 Census.[17]

Lebanon Township was first mentioned on October 26, 1731, as having been formed partly from the now-defunct Amwell Township, though the exact circumstances of its formation are unknown. Lebanon Township was incorporated as one of New Jersey's initial 104 townships by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798. Portions of the township have been take to form Tewksbury Township (March 11, 1755), Clinton Township (April 12, 1841), High Bridge borough (February 19, 1898), Junction borough (February 20, 1895, now known as Hampton borough), Califon borough (April 2, 1898) and Glen Gardner borough (March 26, 1919).[18]

Lebanon Township is the extreme northern township of Hunterdon County. It borders both Warren and Morris Counties. When Lebanon Township was created in 1731, its original borders extended from the Musconetcong River to Readington Township.[19]

Geography[edit]

Natural landscape along Turkey Top Road in northern Lebanon Township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey

Lebanon Township is located at 40°43′35″N 74°53′40″W / 40.726368°N 74.894441°W / 40.726368; -74.894441 (40.726368,-74.894441). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 31.696 square miles (82.092 km2), of which, 31.458 square miles (81.476 km2) of it is land and 0.238 square miles (0.616 km2) of it (0.75%) is water.[1][2]

Place names in Lebabnon Township include Anthony, Bunnvale, Changewater, Hampton Junction, Little Brook, Lower Valley, New Hampton, Newport, Red Mill, Saint Nicholas Village, Stone Mill, The Point and Woodglen.[20]


Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 2,419
1820 2,817 16.5%
1830 3,436 22.0%
1840 3,849 12.0%
1850 2,128 * −44.7%
1860 2,495 17.2%
1870 3,561 42.7%
1880 2,699 −24.2%
1890 2,337 −13.4%
1900 2,253 * −3.6%
1910 2,179 −3.3%
1920 1,083 * −50.3%
1930 1,269 17.2%
1940 1,437 13.2%
1950 1,971 37.2%
1960 2,841 44.1%
1970 4,235 49.1%
1980 5,459 28.9%
1990 5,679 4.0%
2000 5,816 2.4%
2010 6,588 13.3%
Est. 2012 6,474 [10] −1.7%
Population sources:
1810-1920[21] 1840[22] 1850-1870[23]
1850[24] 1870[25] 1880-1890[26]
1890-1910[27] 1910-1930[28]
1930-1990[29] 2000[30][31] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[18]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 6,588 people, 2,296 households, and 1,761 families residing in the township. The population density was 209.4 per square mile (80.8 /km2). There were 2,439 housing units at an average density of 77.5 per square mile (29.9 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 95.01% (6,259) White, 1.68% (111) Black or African American, 0.06% (4) Native American, 1.47% (97) Asian, 0.11% (7) Pacific Islander, 0.59% (39) from other races, and 1.08% (71) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.11% (205) of the population.[7]

There were 2,296 households, of which 33.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.7% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.3% were non-families. 18.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.11.[7]

In the township, 22.6% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.8% from 18 to 24, 19.8% from 25 to 44, 35.6% from 45 to 64, and 15.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45.4 years. For every 100 females there were 99.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.0 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $96,489 (with a margin of error of +/- $7,123) and the median family income was $110,893 (+/- $29,973). Males had a median income of $78,056 (+/- $22,457) versus $56,346 (+/- $14,410) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $43,424 (+/- $5,347). About 4.4% of families and 5.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.8% of those under age 18 and 1.6% of those age 65 or over.[32]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[14] there were 5,816 people, 1,963 households, and 1,556 families residing in the township. The population density was 183.5 people per square mile (70.9/km²). There were 2,020 housing units at an average density of 63.7 per square mile (24.6/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 96.97% White, 0.81% African American, 0.10% Native American, 0.93% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.38% from other races, and 0.79% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.72% of the population.[30][31]

There were 1,963 households out of which 38.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 71.1% were married couples living together, 5.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.7% were non-families. 15.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.79 and the average family size was 3.15.[30][31]

In the township the population was spread out with 25.5% under the age of 18, 5.1% from 18 to 24, 28.9% from 25 to 44, 28.7% from 45 to 64, and 11.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 97.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.1 males.[30][31]

The median income for a household in the township was $77,662, and the median income for a family was $86,145. Males had a median income of $58,306 versus $40,474 for females. The per capita income for the township was $30,793. About 1.0% of families and 2.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including none of those under age 18 and 8.4% of those age 65 or over.[30][31]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Lebanon Township is governed under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year.[5] At an annual reorganization meeting held during the first week of January, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor.

As of 2014, members of the Lebanon Township Committee are Mayor Tom McKee (term as mayor and on committee ends December 31, 2014), Deputy Mayor Ronald Milkowski (term as deputy mayor ends 2014, term on committee ends 2016), Bernie Cryan (2015), Patricia Schriver (2014) and Brian Wunder (2016).[33][34]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Lebanon Township is located in the 7th Congressional District[35] and is part of New Jersey's 23rd state legislative district.[8][36][37]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[38] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[39][40] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[41][42]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 23rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Michael J. Doherty (R, Washington Township, Warren County) and in the General Assembly by John DiMaio (R, Hackettstown) and Erik Peterson (R, Franklin Township, Hunterdon County).[43][44] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[45] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[46]

Hunterdon County is governed by a five-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who serve three-year terms of office at-large on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held each January, the freeholders select one member to serve as the board's Director and another to serve as Deputy Director.[47] As of 2014, Hunterdon County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director J. Matthew Holt (R; Clinton Town, 2015),[48] Freeholder Deputy Director John King (R; Raritan Township, 2015),[49] Suzanne Lagay (R; Holland Township, 2016),[50] John E. Lanza (R; Flemington, 2016)[51] and Robert G. Walton (R; Hampton, 2014).[52][53] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Mary H. Melfi (R; Flemington, 2017),[54] Sheriff Fredrick W. Brown (R; Alexandria Township, 2016)[55] and Surrogate Susan J. Hoffman (R; Kingwood Township, 2018).[56][57][58]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 4,366 registered voters in Lebanon Township, of which 723 (16.6%) were registered as Democrats, 1,759 (40.3%) were registered as Republicans and 1,881 (43.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[59]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 60.4% of the vote here (2,119 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 37.2% (1,305 votes) and other candidates with 1.7% (59 votes), among the 3,507 ballots cast by the township's 4,450 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.8%.[60] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 63.9% of the vote here (2,152 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 34.7% (1,170 votes) and other candidates with 1.2% (49 votes), among the 3,370 ballots cast by the township's 4,249 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 79.3.[61]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 70.3% of the vote here (1,851 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 20.5% (539 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 7.9% (208 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (15 votes), among the 2,633 ballots cast by the township's 4,396 registered voters, yielding a 59.9% turnout.[62]

Education[edit]

Students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade for public school attend the Lebanon Township Schools. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's two schools had an enrollment of 747 students and 69.7 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.72:1.[63] Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[64]) are Valley View School[65] (for grades PreK-4; 392 students) and Woodglen School[66] (for grades 5-8; 355 students).[67] Both schools are located in Lebanon Township, but have a Califon mailing address.

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Voorhees High School in Lebanon Township (although the mailing address is Glen Gardner) as part of the North Hunterdon-Voorhees Regional High School District. Voorhees High School serves students from Califon Borough, Glen Gardner Borough, Hampton Borough, High Bridge Borough, Lebanon Township and Tewksbury Township.[68][69]

Lebanon Township is also home to the Hunterdon Learning Center, an alternative education school founded by James Butters in 1975.[70]

Transportation[edit]

The township had a total of 89.89 miles (144.66 km) of roadways, of which 75.20 miles (121.02 km) are maintained by the municipality, 12.96 miles (20.86 km) by Hunterdon County and 1.73 miles (2.78 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[71]

Route 31 passes through the township, providing access to Interstate 78.

Public transportation[edit]

Local bus service is provided by New Jersey Transit on the 884 route, with train service on the Raritan Valley Line available at the High Bridge station..[72]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Lebanon Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Clerk / Deputy Clerk, Lebanon Township. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 103.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Lebanon, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 7, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Lebanon township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 10. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Lebanon township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Califon, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Glen Gardner, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  14. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  15. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 28, 2012.
  16. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  18. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 154. Accessed October 26, 2012.
  19. ^ Township of Lebanon, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2011.
  20. ^ Local Name Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  21. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 13, 2013.
  22. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed July 13, 2013. Population for 1840 is listed as 3,848.
  23. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 264, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 13, 2013. "Lebanon township was formed in 1798 and contained in 1850 a population of 2,128; in 1860, 2,495; and 1870, 3,561. Anthony, Changewater, White Hall, New Hampton, and Glen Gardner are post towns."
  24. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 139. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed July 13, 2013.
  25. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed July 13, 2013.
  26. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 98. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  27. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 337. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  28. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 716. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  29. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  30. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Lebanon township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  31. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Lebanon township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  32. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Lebanon township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  33. ^ Township Committee, Lebanon Township. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  34. ^ 2014 Municipal Data Sheet, Lebanon Township. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  35. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  36. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 60, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  37. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  39. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  40. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  41. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  42. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  43. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 7, 2014.
  44. ^ District 23 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 7, 2014.
  45. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  46. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  47. ^ About the Board, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  48. ^ Matt Holt, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  49. ^ John King, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  50. ^ Suzanne Lagay, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  51. ^ John E. Lanza, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  52. ^ Robert G. Walton, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  53. ^ Hunterdon County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  54. ^ Hunterdon County Clerk Mary H. Melfi, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  55. ^ Frederick W. Brown; Hunterdon County Sheriff, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  56. ^ Surrogate Susan J. Hoffman, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  57. ^ 2014 Elected Officials, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  58. ^ Wichert, Bill. "Hunterdon County sheriff re-elected, GOP newcomers win freeholder seats", The Star-Ledger, November 5, 2013. Accessed June 30, 2014. "County Sheriff Frederick Brown won a second three-year term over Democratic challenger Paul Carluccio. County Surrogate Susan Hoffman, who ran unopposed, also won re-election to a five-year term.When they join the all-Republican freeholders board in January, Lanza and Lagay will fill the seats vacated by Republicans George Melick and Will Mennen."
  59. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Hunterdon, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  60. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Hunterdon County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  61. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Hunterdon County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  62. ^ 2009 Governor: Hunterdon County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  63. ^ District information for Lebanon Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  64. ^ Data for the Lebanon Township Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  65. ^ Valley View School, Lebanon Township Schools. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  66. ^ Woodglen School, Lebanon Township Schools. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  67. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Lebanon Township Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  68. ^ Voorhees High School 2013 Report Card Narratives, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed June 30, 2014. "Voorhees High School has consistently ranked among the top high schools in New Jersey and in the country. With a current enrollment of 1,133 students in grades 9-12, the school serves the communities of Califon, Glen Gardner, Hampton, High Bridge, Lebanon Township, and Tewksbury Township."
  69. ^ Public School Directory 2012-2013, p. 60. Hunterdon County Department of Education. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  70. ^ Hunterdon Learning Center. Accessed January 6, 2008.
  71. ^ Hunterdon County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  72. ^ Hunterdon County public transportation, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed June 30, 2011.
  73. ^ Conover, Allan. "North Hunterdon grad Julie Culley captures national 5K title", Hunterdon County Democrat, September 29, 2011. Accessed August 13, 2014. "A Lebanon Township native and Rutgers University graduate, Culley finished seven seconds ahead of runnerup Kim Conley of Sacramento, Calif., while third-place Emily Brown of Minnesota was another eight seconds behind her."
  74. ^ Woolum, Janet. Outstanding Women Athletes: Who They Are and How They Influenced Sports in America, p. 220. Greenwood Publishing Group, 1998. ISBN 9781573561204. Accessed June 30, 2014. "Born in Bunnvale, new Jersey, the daughter of John and Jacqueline Decker, Mary moved with her family to Southern California in 1968."
  75. ^ Holl, John. "To Califon, Merv was a regular farm guy", The Star-Ledger, August 14, 2007. Accessed September 4, 2007. "Although it has been decades since he frequented the area, longtime residents remember him as the owner of a farm on Teetertown Road in Lebanon Township, which has a Califon mailing address."
  76. ^ Nutt, Bill. "Bluegrass music fest funds to benefit people of Appalachia", Daily Record (Morristown), July 1, 2011. Accessed July 28, 2011. "Some of this year’s acts are dyed-in-the-wool bluegrass acts. One such group is the Sleepy Man Banjo Boys, which consists of the three Mizzone brothers: Tommy (13), Robbie (11) and Jonny Mizzone (8), who hail from Lebanon Township in Hunterdon County. The trio recently appeared on “The David Letterman Show.”"
  77. ^ Lustig, Jay. "Plainfield's Bernie Worrell - Parliament/Funkadelic alum - graduates to his own band", The Star-Ledger, March 19, 2010. Accessed June 30, 2011. "Worrell, who grew up in Long Branch and Plainfield and has lived in Lebanon Township for the past decade, is collaborating with another former Parliament/Funkadelic music director, guitarist DeWayne “Blackbyrd” McKnight, in a new band, SociaLybrium."

External links[edit]