Raritan, New Jersey

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Raritan, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Raritan
Motto: "A friendly town of friendly people"
Map of Raritan in Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Raritan in Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Raritan, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Raritan, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°34′20″N 74°38′47″W / 40.572127°N 74.646514°W / 40.572127; -74.646514Coordinates: 40°34′20″N 74°38′47″W / 40.572127°N 74.646514°W / 40.572127; -74.646514[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Somerset
Incorporated April 3, 1868 (as town)
Reincorporated May 12, 1948 (as borough)
Government[7]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Jo-Ann Liptak (term ends December 31, 2015)[3][4]
 • Administrator Daniel Jaxel[5]
 • Clerk Rayna E. Harris[6]
Area[2]
 • Total 2.037 sq mi (5.276 km2)
 • Land 1.993 sq mi (5.162 km2)
 • Water 0.044 sq mi (0.114 km2)  1.81%
Area rank 411th of 566 in state
17th of 21 in county[2]
Elevation[8] 125 ft (38 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total 6,881
 • Estimate (2012[12]) 7,242
 • Rank 323rd of 566 in state
15th of 21 in county[13]
 • Density 3,452.2/sq mi (1,332.9/km2)
 • Density rank 186th of 566 in state
6th of 21 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 08869[14][15]
Area code(s) 908[16]
FIPS code 3403561980[17][2][18]
GNIS feature ID 0885365[19][2]
Website www.raritanboro.org

Raritan is a borough in Somerset County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 6,881,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 543 (+8.6%) from the 6,338 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 540 (+9.3%) from the 5,798 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

Geography[edit]

Raritan is located at 40°34′20″N 74°38′47″W / 40.572127°N 74.646514°W / 40.572127; -74.646514 (40.572127,-74.646514). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.037 square miles (5.276 km2), of which, 1.993 square miles (5.162 km2) of it is land and 0.044 square miles (0.114 km2) of it (2.15%) is water.[1][2] Raritan is in the western division of the Raritan Valley (a line of cities in central New Jersey), along with Branchburg and Bridgewater.

History[edit]

Raritan town was originally established as a subdivision within Bridgewater Township by act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 3, 1868. After a series of bitter lawsuits between Raritan and Bridgewater in the 1930s and 1940s, the Legislature allowed Raritan to become a fully independent Borough by an Act on May 12, 1948, based on the results of a referendum passed on June 12, 1948. The new borough incorporated the old town and an additional portion of Bridgewater Township.[21]

Memorial plaque marking Frelinghuysen estate site and signing of the Knox–Porter Resolution on July 2, 1921.

The Knox–Porter Resolution ending United States involvement in World War I was signed by President Harding at the estate of New Jersey Senator Joseph Sherman Frelinghuysen, Sr. on July 2, 1921.[22][23]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 1,009
1880 2,046 102.8%
1890 2,556 24.9%
1900 3,244 26.9%
1910 3,672 13.2%
1920 4,457 21.4%
1930 4,751 6.6%
1940 4,839 1.9%
1950 5,131 6.0%
1960 6,137 19.6%
1970 6,691 9.0%
1980 6,128 −8.4%
1990 5,798 −5.4%
2000 6,338 9.3%
2010 6,881 8.6%
Est. 2012 7,242 [12] 5.2%
Population sources:
1870-1920[24] 1870[25] 1880-1890[26]
1890-1910[27] 1910-1930[28]
1930-1990[29] 2000[30][31] 2010[9][10][11]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 6,881 people, 2,673 households, and 1,748 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,452.2 per square mile (1,332.9 /km2). There were 2,847 housing units at an average density of 1,428.3 per square mile (551.5 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 76.40% (5,257) White, 2.09% (144) Black or African American, 0.16% (11) Native American, 14.29% (983) Asian, 0.01% (1) Pacific Islander, 4.59% (316) from other races, and 2.46% (169) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 16.39% (1,128) of the population.[9]

There were 2,673 households, of which 31.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.5% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.6% were non-families. 27.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.16.[9]

In the borough, 23.1% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 28.2% from 25 to 44, 27.8% from 45 to 64, and 13.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.1 years. For every 100 females there were 96.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.1 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $70,116 (with a margin of error of +/- $10,294) and the median family income was $79,813 (+/- $8,715). Males had a median income of $54,130 (+/- $7,617) versus $44,125 (+/- $12,260) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $34,617 (+/- $5,703). About 6.3% of families and 7.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.4% of those under age 18 and 3.5% of those age 65 or over.[32]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 6,338 people, 2,556 households, and 1,671 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,113.8 people per square mile (1,199.6/km2). There were 2,644 housing units at an average density of 1,299.0 per square mile (500.4/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 87.74% White, 0.93% African American, 0.08% Native American, 8.17% Asian, 0.16% Pacific Islander, 1.64% from other races, and 1.28% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.41% of the population.[30][31]

There were 2,556 households out of which 30.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.0% were married couples living together, 10.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.6% were non-families. 29.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 3.08.[30][31]

In the borough the population was spread out with 22.3% under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 35.0% from 25 to 44, 20.0% from 45 to 64, and 16.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 92.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.1 males.[30][31]

The median income for a household in the borough was $51,122, and the median income for a family was $59,962. Males had a median income of $46,071 versus $35,704 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $26,420. About 5.5% of families and 6.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.0% of those under age 18 and 12.8% of those age 65 or over.[30][31]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Raritan is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions chosen in partisan elections on an at-large basis. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[7]

As of 2013, the Mayor of the Borough of Raritan is Republican Jo-Ann Liptak, whose term of office expires December 31, 2015). Members of the Raritan Borough Council are Council President Donald Tozzi (R, 2014), Denise Carra (R, 2014), Stefanie J. Gara (R, 2015), Paul Giraldi (R, 2013), Gregory A. Lobell (R, 2015) and Anthony E. Soriano, Jr. (R, 2013).[33][34][35][36][37]

Rocco Miele was Raritan's first mayor, serving from its founding in 1948 to 1953.[38]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Raritan is located in the 7th Congressional District[39] and is part of New Jersey's 23rd state legislative district.[10][40][41]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[42] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[43][44] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[45][46]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 23rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Michael J. Doherty (R, Washington Township, Warren County) and in the General Assembly by John DiMaio (R, Hackettstown) and Erik Peterson (R, Franklin Township, Hunterdon County).[47][48] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[49] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[50]

Somerset County is governed by a five-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Director and Deputy Director from among its members.[51] As of 2014, Somerset County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Patrick Scaglione (R, Bridgewater Township, 2015),[52] Freeholder Deputy Director Mark Caliguire (R, Skillman in Montgomery Township, 2015),[53] Peter S. Palmer (R, Bernardsville, term ends December 31, 2014),[54] Patricia L. Walsh (R, Green Brook Township, 2016)[55] and Robert Zaborowski (R, Somerset in Franklin Township, 2014),[56][57] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Brett A. Radi (R, Somerville, 2017),[58] Sheriff Frank J. Provenzano (R, Raritan, 2016)[59][60] and Surrogate Frank Bruno (R, Branchburg, 2015).[61]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 3,926 registered voters in Raritan, of which 1,122 (28.6% vs. 26.0% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 882 (22.5% vs. 25.7%) were registered as Republicans and 1,917 (48.8% vs. 48.2%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 5 voters registered to other parties.[62] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 57.1% (vs. 60.4% in Somerset County) were registered to vote, including 74.2% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 80.4% countywide).[62][63]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 1,514 votes here (52.6% vs. 46.1% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,287 votes (44.7% vs. 52.1%) and other candidates with 42 votes (1.5% vs. 1.1%), among the 2,879 ballots cast by the borough's 3,830 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.2% (vs. 78.7% in Somerset County).[64] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 1,497 votes here (53.4% vs. 51.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 1,239 votes (44.2% vs. 47.2%) and other candidates with 33 votes (1.2% vs. 0.9%), among the 2,802 ballots cast by the borough's 3,606 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.7% (vs. 81.7% in the whole county).[65]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,292 votes here (60.9% vs. 55.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 562 votes (26.5% vs. 34.1%), Independent Chris Daggett with 202 votes (9.5% vs. 8.7%) and other candidates with 22 votes (1.0% vs. 0.7%), among the 2,120 ballots cast by the borough's 3,948 registered voters, yielding a 53.7% turnout (vs. 52.5% in the county).[66]

Education[edit]

Students from Raritan attend the Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District, together with students from Bridgewater Township. Approximately 1,000 students of the 8,800 students in the district are from Raritan. All of the schools in the district are in Bridgewater except for Kennedy, which is in Raritan. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[67]) are six elementary schools (covering grades K-4, except as noted) — Adamsville Elementary School[68] (568 students, including pre-K), Bradley Gardens Elementary School[69] (326), Crim Elementary School[70] (421), Hamilton Elementary School[71] (408), John F. Kennedy Elementary School[72] (443), Milltown Elementary School[73] (519) and Van Holten Elementary School[74] (430) — both Eisenhower Intermediate School[75] (889) and Hillside Intermediate School[76] (575) for grades 5 & 6, Bridgewater-Raritan Middle School[77] (1,445) for grades 7 & 8 and Bridgewater-Raritan High School[78] (2,914) for grades 9-12.[79][80][81][82][83]

During the 1999-2000 school year, Bridgewater-Raritan High School was recognized with the Blue Ribbon School Award of Excellence by the United States Department of Education,[84] the highest award an American school can receive from the federal government.[85][86]

Public high school students also have the option to attend the Somerset County Vocational and Technical High School, a four-year magnet school located in Bridgewater that provides occupational and academic training to students from all of Somerset County.[87]

St. Ann School is a Catholic school for students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade that operates under the supervision of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Metuchen.[88]

Transportation[edit]

Roads[edit]

The borough had a total of 24.34 miles (39.17 km) of roadways, of which 18.26 miles (29.39 km) are maintained by the municipality, 2.85 miles (4.59 km) by Somerset County and 3.23 miles (5.20 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[89]

U.S. Route 202 travereses the borough from east to west.[90] U.S. Route 206 follows the border with Somerville.[91] New Jersey Route 28 has one side of the roadway within the borough as it follows the border with Bridgewater Township.[92] The northern terminus of County Route 567 is in Raritan.[93]

U.S. Routes 202 and 206 intersect with NJ Route 28 at the Somerville Circle on the borders with Bridgewater Township and Somerville, with the eastern half of the circle located in Raritan.[94] As part of an ongoing effort to improve traffic safety at the circle, the New Jersey Department of Transportation has made a series of changes to the structure of the traffic circle, originally constructed during the 1930s. With the suburbanization of the area, the circle was handling an average of 70,000 vehicles each day. In 1994, an overpass was completed to allow traffic on Route 202 between Flemington and Interstate 78 and Interstate 287 to avoid the circle, though the rate of accidents grew from 195 in 1991 before the project started to 302 for the year after the overpass was open to traffic. After yield signs were added in February 1995, the accident rate increased again, to an annualized rate above 400 per year.[95]

Public transportation[edit]

The Raritan train station[96] offers New Jersey Transit service on the Raritan Valley Line to Newark Penn Station.[97][98] The station is north of the town center on Thompson Street. The station building is south of the tracks in the main parking lot and was built in the early 1890s. There are also three other small lots for this station. Raritan is the last station to the west that is serviced by all Raritan Valley Line trains. Further west, service is rush hours only.

It is also served by the CAT-2R route, operated by Community Access Transit.[99]

Community[edit]

General John Frelinghuysen House, now the Raritan Public Library

The Raritan Public Library is located in what was originally the homestead of General John Frederick Frelinghuysen.[100]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Raritan include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Boro Council Profile, Raritan Borough. Accessed February 4, 2013.
  5. ^ Borough Administration, Borough of Raritan. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  6. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Raritan. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 77.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Raritan, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Raritan borough, Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 13, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 10. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Raritan borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed February 13, 2013.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 13, 2013.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Raritan, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed February 13, 2013.
  15. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Raritan, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  17. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed February 13, 2013.
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  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed February 13, 2013.
  21. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 224. Accessed October 23, 2012.
  22. ^ Staff. "Raritan marks the 90th anniversary of the official end of WW1", The Messenger-Gazette, September 12, 2011. Accessed January 10, 2012. "President Warren G. Harding signed the Knox-Porter Resolution on July 2, 1921 on the estate of Joseph Sherman Frelinghuysen, officially ending America’s involvement in World War 1. A ceremony marking the event was held on Sept. 10 at the Raritan library."
  23. ^ Staff. "HARDING CONSULTS OVER PROCLAIMING STATUS OF PEACE; Confers With Hughes at White House on Need of a Presidential Declaration. NEW TREATY CONSIDERED Belief Persists in Some Quarters That Part of Versailles Agreement Will Be Used. WILL STAND BY THE ALLIES But No Decision Is Announced as to the Form of the Administration's Action.", The New York Times, July 6, 1921. Accessed January 10, 2012. "Secretary of State Hughes went to the white House this afternoon shortly after the return of President Harding from his weekend visit to the home of Senator Frelinghuysen, at Raritan, N.J., and conferred with the President..."
  24. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed November 1, 2013.
  25. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed February 11, 2013.
  26. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890.
  27. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed February 11, 2013.
  28. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 718. Accessed February 11, 2013.
  29. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed February 11, 2013.
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  31. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Raritan borough, Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 13, 2013.
  32. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Raritan borough, Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 17, 2013.
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  45. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  55. ^ Patricia Walsh, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed August 5, 2014.
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  68. ^ Adamsville Elementary School, Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  69. ^ Bradley Gardens Elementary School, Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  70. ^ Crim Elementary School, Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  71. ^ Hamilton Elementary School, Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  72. ^ John F. Kennedy Elementary School, Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  73. ^ Milltown Elementary School, Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  74. ^ Van Holten Elementary School, Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  75. ^ Eisenhower Intermediate School, Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  76. ^ Hillside Intermediate School, Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  77. ^ Bridgewater-Raritan Middle School, Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  78. ^ Bridgewater-Raritan High School, Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  79. ^ K-4 Schools, Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  80. ^ 5-6 Schools, Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  81. ^ Middle School, Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  82. ^ High School, Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  83. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  84. ^ Blue Ribbon Schools Program: Schools Recognized 1982-1983 through 1999-2002 (PDF), United States Department of Education. Accessed March 30, 2011.
  85. ^ "CIBA cited as one of the best by Education Department", Journal Inquirer, November 16, 2006. "The Blue Ribbon award is given only to schools that reach the top 10 percent of their state's testing scores over several years or show significant gains in student achievement. It is considered the highest honor a school can achieve."
  86. ^ "Viers Mill School Wins Blue Ribbon; School Scored High on Statewide Test" The Washington Post, September 29, 2005. "For their accomplishments, all three schools this month earned the status of Blue Ribbon School, the highest honor the U.S. Education Department can bestow upon a school."
  87. ^ About SCVTS, Somerset County Vocational and Technical High School. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  88. ^ Find a school, Roman Catholic Diocese of Metuchen. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  89. ^ Ocean County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  90. ^ U.S. Route 202 Straight Line Diagram, July 2006. United States Department of Transportation. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  91. ^ U.S. Route 206 Straight Line Diagram, March 2008. United States Department of Transportation. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  92. ^ Route 28 Straight Line Diagram, April 2008. United States Department of Transportation. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  93. ^ County Route 567 Straight Line Diagram, August 2006. United States Department of Transportation. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  94. ^ Peterson, Iver. "Squaring Traffic Circles With Lights and Bridges", The New York Times, November 12, 1991. Accessed November 3, 2013. "As head of the Bridgewater Police traffic division, he has counted 76 accidents on the half of the Somerville Circle in his township through October this year, as traffic from U.S. Highways 202 and 206 intersects with traffic from State Route 28 coming out of Somerville. The eastern half of the circle, in Raritan Borough, has a similar accident rate."
  95. ^ Newman, Andy. "ROAD AND RAIL;Straightening Out the Perilous Somerville Circle", The New York Times, January 28, 1996. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  96. ^ Raritan station, New Jersey Transit. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  97. ^ Raritan Valley Line, New Jersey Transit. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  98. ^ Somerset County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of January 28, 2010. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  99. ^ http://www.ridewise.org/downloads/Cat2R_2012.pdf
  100. ^ Library History, Raritan Public Library. Accessed July 28, 2012.
  101. ^ Hochron, Adam. "Brother returns first time to Raritan's Basilone Parade", The Reporter, September 9, 2004. Accessed September 8, 2007. "Basilone, born in 1916, grew up in Raritan until joining the Army in 1934. After serving for three years in the Philippines, he returned home for a few years before enlisting in the Marine Corps."
  102. ^ Bipgraphy, Tony Bongiovi. Accessed November 3, 2013. "At the age of seventeen, while conducting experiments with equipment in his Raritan, New Jersey home, Tony Bongiovi discovered the secret to duplicating the well-guarded audio formula for the Motown sound."
  103. ^ Frezza Jr., Harry. "Raritan man attends Final Four for 57th time", Courier News, April 1, 2001. Accessed August 2, 2007. "Ben Carnevale, who turns 86 on Oct. 30, has had the kind of life some people might call legendary. In fact, when you look at his life, which began in a house just off the last trolley stop on Gaston Avenue in Raritan Borough, you might agree. The 1934 Somerville High School graduate is a member of the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame. He is also the winningest coach in United States Naval Academy history, a survivor of a ship that was torpedoed during World War II, and somebody who had a lot to do with building the NCAA basketball tournament."
  104. ^ Assemblyman Jack M. Ciattarelli, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed November 3, 2013.
  105. ^ Joseph Sherman Frelinghuysen, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed January 10, 2012.
  106. ^ via Associated Press. "Mike Grosso May Decide This Week", Spartanburg Herald-Journal, January 23, 1967. Accessed November 3, 2013. "The 6-foot-9 230-pound pivotman from Raritan, completed mid-term examinations at the University of South Carolina Saturday and left for his home."

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