Flemington, New Jersey

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Flemington, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Flemington
Flemington from Prospect Hill, looking southeast
Flemington from Prospect Hill, looking southeast
Location of Flemington within Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Location of Flemington within Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Flemington, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Flemington, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°30′31″N 74°51′36″W / 40.508651°N 74.860113°W / 40.508651; -74.860113Coordinates: 40°30′31″N 74°51′36″W / 40.508651°N 74.860113°W / 40.508651; -74.860113[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Hunterdon
Incorporated April 26, 1910
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Erica Edwards (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Clerk Rebecca Newman[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 1.077 sq mi (2.790 km2)
 • Land 1.077 sq mi (2.790 km2)
 • Water 0.000 sq mi (0.000 km2)  0.00%
Area rank 493rd of 566 in state
22nd of 26 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 180 ft (50 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 4,581
 • Estimate (2012[10]) 532
 • Rank 392nd of 566 in state
9th of 26 in county[11]
 • Density 4,252.2/sq mi (1,641.8/km2)
 • Density rank 141st of 566 in state
1st of 26 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08822[12][13]
Area code(s) 908[14]
FIPS code 3401923700[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 885220[17][2]
Website www.historicflemington.com

Flemington is a borough in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 4,581,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 381 (+9.1%) from the 4,200 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 153 (+3.8%) from the 4,047 counted in the 1990 Census.[18] It is the county seat of Hunterdon County.[19][20] Most of the borough is in the Amwell Valley (a low-lying area of the Newark Basin), but northwest portions of the borough sit on the Hunterdon Plateau.

Flemington is an independent municipality located entirely within (and completely surrounded by) Raritan Township and is located near the geographic center of the township.

History[edit]

The Hunterdon County Courthouse, where Bruno Hauptmann was tried.

Before European settlement, the land that comprises Flemington, as was all of Hunterdon County, was the territory of the Lenni Lenape Native Americans. In 1712, as part of a land parcel of 9,170 acres (37.1 km2), the Flemington area was acquired by William Penn and Daniel Coxe.

The surrounding fertile farmland dictated that the beginnings of Flemington were agricultural. Early German and English settlers engaged in industries dependent on farm products. As time passed poultry and dairy farms superseded crops in agricultural importance. An example of early settlement families was Johann David and Anna Maria Ephland, who emigrated in 1709 from Germany through London to New York and settled on his 147.5-acre (0.597 km2) farm in 1717. They raised their seven children, and two from his previous marriage, on the farm that now makes up the core of Flemington.

In 1785, Flemington was chosen as the County Seat of Hunterdon. Fire destroyed the old courthouse in 1826 and the City of Lambertville made an ultimately unsuccessful attempt to have the seat relocated there. Flemington remained the County Seat and the Courthouse which stands today on Main Street was built.

What is now Flemington was originally formed as a town by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 14, 1870, within portions of Raritan Township. It became a village as of June 11, 1894, still within Raritan Township. Flemington was finally incorporated as an independent borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 7, 1910, based on the results of a referendum held on April 26, 1910, and was formally separated from Raritan Township. The borough's incorporation was confirmed on April 27, 1931.[21]

In 1856, the Hunterdon County Agricultural society purchased 40 acres (16 ha) of land that would accommodate the people, exhibits and livestock for the County (Flemington) Fair. The purpose of this Fair was to promote competition between farmers, stock raisers and machinery manufacturers. The fair was held every year at the Flemington Fairgrounds which also was the site of Flemington Fair Speedway (later Flemington Raceway). From 1992 through 1995, the speedway hosted the Race of Champions, a race for modified racers.[22] The speedway hosted a NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series race from 1995 to 1998. In 2003, the County Fair adopted a new name, The Hunterdon County 4-H and Agricultural Fair, and moved to the South County Park in East Amwell Township.

On February 13, 1935, a jury in Flemington found Bruno Richard Hauptmann guilty of the kidnapping and murder of Charles Lindbergh's baby boy.

Historic landmarks[edit]

By 1980, 65% of Flemington borough had been included on the New Jersey Register of Historic Places and is now on the National Register of Historic Places.

Geography[edit]

Flemington Borough is located at 40°30′31″N 74°51′36″W / 40.508651°N 74.860113°W / 40.508651; -74.860113 (40.508651,-74.860113). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.077 square miles (2.790 km2), all of which was land.[2][1]

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Flemington, New Jersey (1981-2010 normals)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 74
(23)
77
(25)
88
(31)
95
(35)
99
(37)
102
(39)
106
(41)
108
(42)
105
(41)
97
(36)
84
(29)
75
(24)
108
(42)
Average high °F (°C) 38
(3)
41
(5)
50
(10)
62
(17)
73
(23)
81
(27)
86
(30)
84
(29)
77
(25)
65
(18)
54
(12)
42
(6)
62.8
(17.1)
Average low °F (°C) 20
(−7)
22
(−6)
29
(−2)
38
(3)
48
(9)
57
(14)
62
(17)
61
(16)
53
(12)
41
(5)
33
(1)
25
(−4)
41.0
(5)
Record low °F (°C) −18
(−28)
−16
(−27)
−6
(−21)
10
(−12)
25
(−4)
34
(1)
41
(5)
37
(3)
27
(−3)
18
(−8)
2
(−17)
−14
(−26)
−18
(−28)
Precipitation inches (mm) 3.78
(96)
3.02
(76.7)
4.37
(111)
4.23
(107.4)
4.63
(117.6)
4.65
(118.1)
4.94
(125.5)
3.68
(93.5)
4.43
(112.5)
4.49
(114)
3.77
(95.8)
4.37
(111)
50.36
(1,279.1)
Snowfall inches (cm) 8.9
(22.6)
9.4
(23.9)
4.7
(11.9)
1.2
(3)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
.4
(1)
5.1
(13)
29.7
(75.4)
Avg. precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 10.0 8.5 10.3 11.2 11.7 11.1 9.9 9.5 8.0 8.5 9.2 10.0 117.9
Avg. snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 4.1 3.1 2.3 .4 0 0 0 0 0 0 .3 2.3 12.5
Source: NOAA [24]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 1,174
1870 1,412 20.3%
1880 1,751 24.0%
1890 1,977 12.9%
1900 2,145 8.5%
1910 2,693 25.5%
1920 2,590 −3.8%
1930 2,729 5.4%
1940 2,617 −4.1%
1950 3,058 16.9%
1960 3,232 5.7%
1970 3,917 21.2%
1980 4,132 5.5%
1990 4,047 −2.1%
2000 4,200 3.8%
2010 4,581 9.1%
Est. 2012 4,635 [10] 1.2%
Population sources:
1860-1920[25] 1870[26][27] 1880-1890[28]
1890-1910[29] 1910-1930[30]
1930-1990[31] 2000[32][33] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 4,581 people, 1,815 households, and 996.4 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,252.2 per square mile (1,641.8 /km2). There were 1,926 housing units at an average density of 1,787.8 per square mile (690.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 78.48% (3,595) White, 3.93% (180) Black or African American, 0.31% (14) Native American, 5.81% (266) Asian, 0.02% (1) Pacific Islander, 8.71% (399) from other races, and 2.75% (126) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 26.15% (1,198) of the population.[7]

There were 1,815 households of which 28.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 37.6% were married couples living together, 11.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 45.1% were non-families. 37.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 3.20.[7]

In the borough, 22.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 33.9% from 25 to 44, 24.3% from 45 to 64, and 10.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35.3 years. For every 100 females there were 105.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 106.9 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $54,261 (with a margin of error of +/- $15,065) and the median family income was $66,042 (+/- $12,761). Males had a median income of $45,934 (+/- $5,574) versus $47,917 (+/- $11,616) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $31,407 (+/- $3,648). About 14.0% of families and 16.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 30.0% of those under age 18 and 8.9% of those age 65 or over.[34]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 4,202 people, 1,804 households, and 997 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,927.4 people per square mile (1,515.5/km2). There were 1,876 housing units at an average density of 1,754.2 per square mile (676.9/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 89.71% White, 1.19% African American, 0.31% Native American, 3.12% Asian, 0.17% Pacific Islander, 3.14% from other races, and 2.36% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 10.98% of the population.[32][33]

There were 1,804 households out of which 26.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.7% were married couples living together, 11.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 44.7% were non-families. 37.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size was 3.00.[32][33]

In the borough the population was spread out with 22.2% under the age of 18, 8.6% from 18 to 24, 36.9% from 25 to 44, 20.2% from 45 to 64, and 12.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 94.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.7 males.[32][33]

The median income for a household in the borough was $39,886, and the median income for a family was $51,582. Males had a median income of $38,594 versus $31,250 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $23,769. About 5.0% of families and 6.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.5% of those under age 18 and 3.0% of those age 65 or over.[32][33]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Flemington is governed under the borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at large. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office, and votes only in case of a tie. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[5]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Flemington Borough is Erica Edwards, whose term of office ends December 31, 2014. Members of the Flemington Borough Council are Joey Novick, Dorothy Fine, Phil Greiner, John Gorman, Brian Swingle and Phil Velella.[35]

Police[edit]

The borough's police department operates under Chief of police George Becker, with one sergeant, one corporal, two detectives, 10 patrolmen and a parking enforcement officer. The department offers a Police Explorer program composed of 20 youth participants.[36]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Flemington is located in the 7th Congressional District[37] and is part of New Jersey's 16th state legislative district.[8][38][39] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Flemington had been in the 23rd state legislative district.[40]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[41] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[42][43] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[44][45]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 16th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Christopher Bateman (R, Somerville) and in the General Assembly by Jack Ciattarelli (R, Hillsborough Township) and Donna Simon (R, Readington Township). [46][47] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[48] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[49]

Hunterdon County is governed by a five-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who serve three-year terms of office at-large on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held each January, the freeholders select one member to serve as the board's Director and another to serve as Deputy Director.[50] As of 2013, Hunterdon County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Robert G. Walton (Hampton, 2014),[51] Freeholder Deputy Director J. Matthew Holt (Clinton Town, 2015),[52] John King (Raritan Township, 2015), George B. Melick (Tewksbury Township, 2013)[53] and William G. Mennen (Tewksbury Township, 2013).[54].[55] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Mary H. Melfi (Flemington, 2014),[56] Sheriff Fredrick W. Brown (Alexandria Township, 2013)[57] Surrogate Susan J. Hoffman (Kingwood Township, 2013).[58][59]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 2,037 registered voters in Flemington, of which 521 (25.6%) were registered as Democrats, 633 (31.1%) were registered as Republicans and 880 (43.2%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[60]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 49.9% of the vote here (794 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 47.1% (750 votes) and other candidates with 2.1% (34 votes), among the 1,591 ballots cast by the borough's 2,118 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.1%.[61] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 50.0% of the vote here (761 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 49.9% (760 votes) and other candidates with 1.3% (25 votes), among the 1,523 ballots cast by the borough's 1,966 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 77.5.[62]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 54.6% of the vote here (601 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 32.2% (354 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 10.2% (112 votes) and other candidates with 1.8% (20 votes), among the 1,101 ballots cast by the borough's 2,032 registered voters, yielding a 54.2% turnout.[63]

Education[edit]

Children in public school for pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade attend the Flemington-Raritan Regional School District, which also serves children from the neighboring community of Raritan Township. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[64]) are four elementary schools — Barley Sheaf School[65] (grades PreK-4; 444 students) - Flemington; Copper Hill School[66] (PreK-4; 607) - Ringoes; Francis A. Desmares School[67] (K-4; 492) - Flemington; and Robert Hunter School[68] (K-4; 449) - Flemington — Reading-Fleming Intermediate School[69] (5-6; 801) in Flemington and J. P. Case Middle School[70] (7-8; 832) - Flemington.[71]

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Hunterdon Central Regional High School, part of the Hunterdon Central Regional High School District, which serves students in central Hunterdon County from Flemington and from Delaware Township, East Amwell Township, Raritan Township and Readington Township.[72]

High school students may also attend Hunterdon County Polytech Career Academy, a county-wide vocational school that offers career and technical education at two campuses in Raritan Township, New Jersey.[73]

Mediatech Foundation[edit]

Inside view of Mediatech Foundation

Flemington is the home of the Mediatech Foundation, an experimental community technology center located in the second floor of the Flemington Free Public Library, on Main Street. Mediatech is designed to provide free public access to all forms of digital media. Video games can be checked out just like library books.[74]

Transportation[edit]

Aerial photo of Flemington Circle

Flemington Circle is the largest of three traffic circles in the environs of Flemington and sits just to the southeast of Flemington's historic downtown. U.S. Route 202 and Route 31 approach the circle separately from the north and continue south concurrent, and the circle is the eastern terminus of Route 12. It is one of only a handful of New Jersey's once-widespread traffic circles still extant according to its original design. The circle sees significant congestion on weekends because of the new developments and big-box retailers. Unlike most circles, traffic on US 202 does not yield on entry; US 202, being a main four-lane divided highway, gets the right-of-way.[75]

Two other traffic circles exist on Route 12 just west of the Flemington Circle. Both handle a much smaller volume of traffic; the first one, at South Main Street, named the Main Street Circle (old Route 31), is also in Flemington, and the other, at Flemington Road / Route 523 (old Route 12) and Mine Street, is in Raritan Township. This circle is known informally amongst residents as Dvoor Circle after the historic farm that surrounded parts of it. Route 12 traffic has the right of way in both of these circles, just as US 202 does in Flemington Circle.

Trans-Bridge Lines provides frequent daily bus service, east to New York NY and west to Doylestown and Bethlehem PA.[76] Local routes are provided by Hunterdon County's "Flemington Shuffle" bus service, as well the Cross County Service, which offers demand-response service to all municipalities in Hunterdon County.[77][78]

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Flemington include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Departments, Borough of Flemington. Accessed August 7, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 103.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Flemington, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Flemington borough, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 7, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 8. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Flemington borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed August 7, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Flemington, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 7, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Flemington, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 12, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed August 7, 2012.
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  19. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  20. ^ Hunterdon County, NJ, National Association of Counties. Accessed January 20, 2013.
  21. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 155. Accessed August 7, 2012.
  22. ^ "Past Modified Winners page of Race of Champions website". raceofchampions.net. Retrieved May 9, 2007. 
  23. ^ Matt DeBlass (September 26, 2008). "Union Hotel closes; liquor license stays". Hunterdon County Democrat. Retrieved December 14, 2008. 
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  26. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 267, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed October 12, 2013. "Raritan township was formed from Amwell in 1838. Its population in 1850 was 3,070; in 1860, 2,270; and in 1870, 3,654. Flemington the county seat is in this township. Its population in 1870 was 1,412. In the vicinity of Flemington are valuable copper mines."
  27. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 259. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed October 12, 2013.
  28. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed October 12, 2013.
  29. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed October 12, 2013. No population is listed for Flemington.
  30. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed December 17, 2011.
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  34. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Flemington borough, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 7, 2012.
  35. ^ Borough Council (Elected Officials) - 2012 Elected Officials and Assignments, Borough of Flemington. Accessed August 7, 2012.
  36. ^ Borough Administration, Borough of Flemington. Accessed August 20, 2012.
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  43. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  44. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  45. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
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  49. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  50. ^ About the Board, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  51. ^ Robert Walton, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  52. ^ Matt Holt, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  53. ^ George B. Melick, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  54. ^ William Mennen, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  55. ^ Hunterdon County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  56. ^ Hunterdon County Clerk Mary H. Melfi, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  57. ^ Frederick W. Brown; Hunterdon County Sheriff, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  58. ^ Surrogate Susan J. Hoffman, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
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  60. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Hunterdon, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 14, 2012.
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  63. ^ 2009 Governor: Hunterdon County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  64. ^ Data for the Flemington-Raritan Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  65. ^ Barley Sheaf School, Flemington-Raritan Regional School District. Accessed October 9, 2013.
  66. ^ Copper Hill School, Flemington-Raritan Regional School District. Accessed October 9, 2013.
  67. ^ Francis A. Desmares School, Flemington-Raritan Regional School District. Accessed October 9, 2013.
  68. ^ Robert Hunter School, Flemington-Raritan Regional School District. Accessed October 9, 2013.
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