Hampton, New Jersey

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See Hampton Township, New Jersey for the municipality in Sussex County
Hampton, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Hampton
Map of Hampton in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Hampton in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Hampton, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hampton, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°42′16″N 74°58′18″W / 40.70455°N 74.971571°W / 40.70455; -74.971571Coordinates: 40°42′16″N 74°58′18″W / 40.70455°N 74.971571°W / 40.70455; -74.971571[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Hunterdon
Incorporated February 20, 1895 as Junction Borough
Renamed February 11, 1909 as Hampton Borough
Government[6]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Peter Winter (R, term ends December 31, 2013)[3][4]
 • Clerk Cathy Drummond[5]
Area[1]
 • Total 1.545 sq mi (4.001 km2)
 • Land 1.531 sq mi (3.965 km2)
 • Water 0.014 sq mi (0.036 km2)  0.89%
Area rank 448th of 566 in state
16th of 26 in county[1]
Elevation[7] 417 ft (127 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 1,401
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 1,382
 • Rank 519th of 566 in state
20th of 26 in county[12][13]
 • Density 915.1/sq mi (353.3/km2)
 • Density rank 396th of 566 in state
12th of 26 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08827[14][15]
Area code(s) 908[16]
FIPS code 3401929460[1][17][18]
GNIS feature ID 0885243[1][19]
Website www.hamptonboro.com

Hampton is a borough in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 1,401,[8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 145 (-9.4%) from the 1,546 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 31 (+2.0%) from the 1,515 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

What is now Hampton was originally incorporated by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature as Junction Borough on February 20, 1895, from portions of both Lebanon Township and Bethlehem Township, based on the results of a referendum held on the previous day. By a resolution of the borough council, the name was changed to Hampton as of February 11, 1909. In 1931, additional territory was annexed from both Glen Gardner borough and Bethlehem Township.[21]

Located on the banks of the Musconetcong River, Hampton has changed little since it was first settled in 1800. In 1880, the town consisted of a store, hotel, cabinet manufacturer, blacksmith, wheelwright shop, grist mill, school house and about 25 dwellings. Hampton was once known as "Junction" because the Central Railroad of New Jersey and the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad crossed through here.[22]

Geography[edit]

Hampton is located at 40°42′16″N 74°58′18″W / 40.70455°N 74.971571°W / 40.70455; -74.971571 (40.70455,-74.971571). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.545 square miles (4.001 km2), of which, 1.531 square miles (3.965 km2) of it was land and 0.014 square miles (0.036 km2) of it (0.89%) was water.[1][2]

The borough borders Bethlehem Township, Glen Gardner Borough, and Lebanon Township. Hampton also borders Warren County.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 998
1910 914 −8.4%
1920 916 0.2%
1930 861 −6.0%
1940 864 0.3%
1950 975 12.8%
1960 1,135 16.4%
1970 1,386 22.1%
1980 1,614 16.5%
1990 1,515 −6.1%
2000 1,546 2.0%
2010 1,401 −9.4%
Est. 2013 1,382 [11] −1.4%
Population sources:
1900-1920[23] 1900-1910[24]
1910-1930[25] 1930-1990[26]
2000[27][28] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 1,401 people, 570 households, and 368.2 families residing in the borough. The population density was 915.1 per square mile (353.3 /km2). There were 612 housing units at an average density of 399.7 per square mile (154.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 92.29% (1,293) White, 2.50% (35) Black or African American, 0.71% (10) Native American, 1.86% (26) Asian, 0.07% (1) Pacific Islander, 1.00% (14) from other races, and 1.57% (22) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 5.35% (75) of the population.[8]

There were 570 households, of which 29.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.4% were married couples living together, 9.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.4% were non-families. 30.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 3.11.[8]

In the borough, 21.6% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 25.8% from 25 to 44, 31.1% from 45 to 64, and 13.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.6 years. For every 100 females there were 101.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.0 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $63,681 (with a margin of error of +/- $9,751) and the median family income was $82,396 (+/- $19,162). Males had a median income of $54,500 (+/- $9,914) versus $33,594 (+/- $8,886) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $30,468 (+/- $3,353). About 10.2% of families and 10.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.3% of those under age 18 and 10.1% of those age 65 or over.[29]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 1,546 people, 559 households, and 377 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,006.8 people per square mile (387.6/km2). There were 574 housing units at an average density of 373.8 per square mile (143.9/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 91.01% White, 4.98% African American, 0.39% Native American, 0.97% Asian, 0.78% from other races, and 1.88% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.85% of the population.[27][28]

There were 559 households out of which 36.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.3% were married couples living together, 10.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.4% were non-families. 27.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.20.[27][28]

In the borough the population was spread out with 25.7% under the age of 18, 10.9% from 18 to 24, 30.3% from 25 to 44, 22.1% from 45 to 64, and 11.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 106.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 108.0 males.[27][28]

The median income for a household in the borough was $51,111, and the median income for a family was $64,583. Males had a median income of $45,096 versus $32,000 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $22,440. About 7.1% of families and 8.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.1% of those under age 18 and 3.5% of those age 65 or over.[27][28]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Hampton is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at large. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[6]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Hampton Borough is Peter Winter, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015. Members of the Hampton Borough Council are Council President Todd Shaner, Bob Baker (R, 2014), Peter Desch (R, 2013), Sarah McDougal (I, 2014) and Carroll Swenson (R, 2013), with one seat vacant.[4][5][30]

Meetings[edit]

  • Borough Council: 2nd and 4th Monday of each month at 8:00 pm - Borough Hall
  • Board of Adjustment, Planning Board: 3rd Thursday of each month at 7:30 pm - Borough Hall
  • Board of Health: 1st and 3rd Monday of each month at 8:00 pm - Borough Hall
  • Rescue Squad: 1st Wednesday of each month 7:30 pm (General Body Meeting) 3rd Wednesday of each month 7:00 pm (Drill Night) - Rescue Squad Building

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Hampton is located in the 7th Congressional District[31] and is part of New Jersey's 23rd state legislative district.[9][32][33]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[34] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[35][36] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[37][38]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 23rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Michael J. Doherty (R, Washington Township, Warren County) and in the General Assembly by John DiMaio (R, Hackettstown) and Erik Peterson (R, Franklin Township, Hunterdon County).[39][40] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[41] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[42]

Hunterdon County is governed by a five-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who serve three-year terms of office at-large on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held each January, the freeholders select one member to serve as the board's Director and another to serve as Deputy Director.[43] As of 2014, Hunterdon County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director J. Matthew Holt (R; Clinton Town, 2015),[44] Freeholder Deputy Director John King (R; Raritan Township, 2015),[45] Suzanne Lagay (R; Holland Township, 2016),[46] John E. Lanza (R; Flemington, 2016)[47] and Robert G. Walton (R; Hampton, 2014).[48][49] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Mary H. Melfi (R; Flemington, 2017),[50] Sheriff Fredrick W. Brown (R; Alexandria Township, 2016)[51] and Surrogate Susan J. Hoffman (R; Kingwood Township, 2018).[52][53][54]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 884 registered voters in Hampton, of which 182 (20.6%) were registered as Democrats, 270 (30.5%) were registered as Republicans and 432 (48.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[55]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 53.4% of the vote here (355 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 43.9% (292 votes) and other candidates with 2.1% (14 votes), among the 665 ballots cast by the borough's 894 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.4%.[56] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 58.6% of the vote here (379 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 39.6% (256 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (7 votes), among the 647 ballots cast by the borough's 861 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 75.1.[57]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 66.8% of the vote here (310 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 23.9% (111 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 8.4% (39 votes) and other candidates with 0.4% (2 votes), among the 464 ballots cast by the borough's 879 registered voters, yielding a 52.8% turnout.[58]

Public services[edit]

Emergency services[edit]

Fire Department

The Hampton Fire Company began in 1899 as the Junction Fire Company following the completion of the borough wide water system, including hydrants, in that same year. In 1909, the name changed to the Muscometcong Fire Company and then later to the Hampton Fire Company. The Fire Company built for the borough the current Borough Hall/Fire House in 1951. The Borough occupied the east side and the Fire Company used the west side. In 1981, the Fire Company expanded the building by adding a second floor for borough use and the Fire Company took over the entire lower floor.

The Fire Company currently has as active apparatuses a 1959 International Harvester fire engine, a 1987 Emergency One Fire Engine, a 2000 Pierce Fire Engine, a 1995 Chevy Suburban command vehicle, and a 1978 GMC Rescue Truck. There are over 40 active members on the rolls which includes an active Junior Firefighter program for young people age 14 and over. The Fire Company consists entirely volunteers who dedicate their time and hard work to serve the people of Hampton and its surrounding communities. To raise money to purchase equipment and train members, the Fire Company rents out the hall for various events and hosts breakfasts on the third Sunday of every month from October to April.

Emergency Squad

In 1955, the Hampton Fire Company selected one of its members, Gilbert Riddle, to organize an emergency squad. With the backing of the Fire Company, the present squad became operational in 1956. The Fire Company purchased the first ambulance, which was housed in the firehouse until the squad's permanent facilities were completed. On August 6, 1966 the dedication of the permanent home of the Emergency Squad took place. The Hampton Emergency Squad incorporated itself in 1976, becoming independent of the Fire Company, however its name did not change. In January 1978, the squad established an auxiliary membership. This membership is made up of people who wish to help the Hampton Fire Company Emergency Squad in its endeavors to provide the finest in first aid protection. A new GMC rescue truck was purchased in 1978. It was specially equipped with four-wheel drive and quartz spotlights for better lighting during accidents and fires. The rescue truck is still in service with the fire company today. The old 1968 Cadillac ambulance was replaced in 1982 by a Braun ambulance, and was later used as a service vehicle. A Ford Horton ambulance was purchased in 1987, and in 1992 another Ford Horton ambulance was added. An additional bay was added to the building in 1979 to provide storage of emergency vehicles and equipment. The Hampton Emergency Squad dedicated their building to the memory of Charles Tampier and William Deemer in 1982 in recognition of their exceptional service to our squad and community. Construction of the second story addition began in September 1985. After many long hours of planning sessions, the building committee and the community saw the fruits of their labor come to completion in 1986. The members of the Hampton Emergency Squad are committed to providing the latest in pre-hospital emergency medical care to the community. All members are certified Emergency Medical Technicians who continuously train and refresh their skills through drills and classroom experience. All members are able to provide defibrillation to a patient in cardiac arrest, increasing the probability of survival dramatically.

Public utilities[edit]

Garbage is collected every Monday except when the date falls on a national holiday. Garbage will then be picked up on the next working day. Sanitation limit is two thirty gallon containers per household per week. Extra bag stickers can be purchased from the Municipal office.

Chip, brush, and leaves are collected on the first Thursday and Friday of each month. Leaves are collected October 24 - December 30. Branch size is not to exceed 6 inches in diameter and 10 feet in length.

Spring and Fall curbside cleanup dates vary each year and there are several restrictions on the items that may be thrown away.

Education[edit]

The Hampton School District serves students in kindergarten though eighth grade. The Hampton Public School served an enrollment of 182 students as of the 2010-11 school year.[59]

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Voorhees High School in Glen Gardner, which serves students from Califon, Glen Gardner, Hampton, High Bridge, Lebanon and Tewksbury.[60] The school is part of the North Hunterdon-Voorhees Regional High School District, which also serves the communities of Clinton Town, Clinton Township, Franklin Township, Lebanon Borough and Union Township.[61]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Hampton include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Brill, Douglas B. "Hunterdon County governments reorganize", The Express-Times, January 21, 2012. Accessed November 14, 2012. "Republican Mayor Peter Winter was sworn into a four-year term. He replaces Kristine Peterson, who did not seek re-election. Re-elected Councilman James Cregar and re-elected Councilwoman Sarah McDougal were sworn into new three-year terms. Bob Baker, Carroll Swenson and Peter Desch remain on the council. Independent McDougal is the only non-Republican."
  5. ^ a b Hunterdon County webpage for Hampton Borough, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 103.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Hampton, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Hampton borough, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 10. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Hampton borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Hampton, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  15. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Hampton, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  17. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  18. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 28, 2012.
  19. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  21. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 155. Accessed October 26, 2012.
  22. ^ Hunterdon County webpage for Hampton Borough, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed March 20, 2007.
  23. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  24. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 337. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  25. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 716. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  26. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  27. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Hampton borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  28. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Hampton borough, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  29. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Hampton borough, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  30. ^ Mayor and Council, hampton Borough. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  31. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  32. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 58, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  33. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  34. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  35. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  36. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  37. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  38. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  39. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 7, 2014.
  40. ^ District 23 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 7, 2014.
  41. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  42. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  43. ^ About the Board, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  44. ^ Matt Holt, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  45. ^ John King, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  46. ^ Suzanne Lagay, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  47. ^ John E. Lanza, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  48. ^ Robert G. Walton, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  49. ^ Hunterdon County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  50. ^ Hunterdon County Clerk Mary H. Melfi, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  51. ^ Frederick W. Brown; Hunterdon County Sheriff, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  52. ^ Surrogate Susan J. Hoffman, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  53. ^ 2014 Elected Officials, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  54. ^ Wichert, Bill. "Hunterdon County sheriff re-elected, GOP newcomers win freeholder seats", The Star-Ledger, November 5, 2013. Accessed June 30, 2014. "County Sheriff Frederick Brown won a second three-year term over Democratic challenger Paul Carluccio. County Surrogate Susan Hoffman, who ran unopposed, also won re-election to a five-year term.When they join the all-Republican freeholders board in January, Lanza and Lagay will fill the seats vacated by Republicans George Melick and Will Mennen."
  55. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Hunterdon, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  56. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Hunterdon County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  57. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Hunterdon County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  58. ^ 2009 Governor: Hunterdon County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  59. ^ Data for the Hampton Public School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  60. ^ Voorhees High School 2013 Report Card Narratives, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 13, 2013. "Voorhees High School has consistently ranked among the top high schools in the state. With an enrollment of 1126 students in grades 9-12, the school serves the communities of Califon, Glen Gardner, Hampton, High Bridge, Lebanon Township, and Tewksbury Township."
  61. ^ About the District, North Hunterdon-Voorhees Regional High School District. Accessed October 14, 2013. "Our district consists of 12 municipalities: North Hunterdon High School educates students from: Bethlehem Township, Clinton Town, Clinton Township, Franklin Township, Lebanon Borough, Union Township; Voorhees High School educates students from: Califon, Glen Gardner, Hampton, High Bridge, Lebanon Township, Tewksbury Township"
  62. ^ Glenway Wescott Biography (1901–1987), biography.com. Accessed August 1, 2007. "He returned to America and settled near Hampton, NJ."
  63. ^ Jordan, Chris. "In New Jersey, legendary keyboardist Bernie Worrell is never far from homeIn New Jersey, legendary keyboardist Bernie Worrell is never far from home", Asbury Park Press, June 21, 2012. Accessed November 14, 2012. "Worrell has brought that sense of fun to millions across the globe, most notably as a member of Parliament-Funkadelic. In the upcoming weeks, his focus will be on his home state of Jersey. His annual Local and Legend festival take place Saturday, June 23, at the Unionville Vineyards in Ringoes, near his home in Hampton."

External links[edit]