List of ancient Egyptians

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This is a list of ancient Egyptian people who have articles on Wikipedia. The list covers key ancient Egyptian individuals from the start of the first dynasty until the end of the ancient Egyptian nation when the Ptolemaic Dynasty ended and Egypt became a province of Rome in 30 BC.

Note that the dates given are approximate. The list presented below is based on the conventional chronology of Ancient Egypt, mostly based on the Digital Egypt for Universities database developed by the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology.

A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z

B[edit]

Name Main Title Dynasty Date Comment
Babaef Vizier 4th dynasty (fl. c. 26th century BC) Also known as Khnumbaf. He was a vizier during the reign of king Shepseskaf. He was probably the son of the vizier Duaenre.
Bakenkhonsu High Priest of Amun 19th dynasty (c. 1303 BC – c. 1213 BC) From the time of pharaoh Ramesses II.
Bakenranef Pharaoh 24th dynasty (reigned 725 BC – 720 BC) Also known as Bocchoris. Was briefly a king of the 24th dynasty of Egypt. Based at Sais in the western Delta. Captured and executed by Shabaka, a king of the 25th dynasty.
Baketwernel Queen 20th dynasty (fl. c. late-12th century BC) Great Royal Wife of Ramesses IX.
Baskakeren King of Kush (fl. c. late-5th century BC) King of Kush (reigned c. 405 BC – c. 404 BC) and was probably a son of King Malewiebamani and the younger brother of King Amanineteyerike. He succeeded Amanineteyerike to the throne.
Baufra Prince 4th dynasty (fl. c. 26th century BC) Also known as Baufre or Bauefre. Baufra was a son of Pharaoh Khufu.
Bay Irsu Chancellor 19th dynasty (fl. c. late-13th century BC) Served under pharaoh Seti II and later became an influential powerbroker in the closing stages of the 19th dynasty. Executed.
Bebi Vizier 11th dynasty fl. c. 21st century BC Egyptian vizier under king Mentuhotep II.
Bebiankh Pharaoh 16th dynasty fl. c. early-16th century BC Also known as Seuserenre Bebiankh. The successor of king Semenre.
Behenu Queen 6th dynasty fl. c. 23rd century BC She is thought to have been the wife of either Pepi I or of Pepi II.
Bek (or Bak) Royal Sculptor 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC Chief royal sculptor during the reign of Pharaoh Akhenaten. Bek followed the king to Akhetaten, the city founded by Akhenaten. He oversaw the construction of the great temple statues of the king.
Beketamun Princess 18th dynasty (fl. c. mid-15th century BC) Also known as Beket. A daughter of Pharaoh Thutmose III.
Beketaten Princess 18th dynasty (fl. c. mid-14th century BC) She was the youngest daughter of Pharaoh Amenhotep III and Tiye and thus the sister of Pharaoh Akhenaten.
Benerib Queen 1st dynasty (fl. 31st century BC) Benerib was most likely a wife of pharaoh Hor-Aha, but she was not the mother of his heir, Djer.
Berenice Princess/Queen Ptolemaic (fl. 261 BC – 246 BC) Also known as Berenice Syra. Daughter of the Egyptian king Ptolemy II Philadelphus and Arsinoe I. She married the Seleucid monarch Antiochus II Theos who divorced his wife, Laodice I. When Antiochus II died, Berenice claimed the regency for her son, Seleucus. However, both Berenice and her son were then killed by Laodice I.
Berenice I Queen Ptolemaic (c. 340 BC – c. 275 BC) A Macedonian noblewoman who, through her marriage to Ptolemy I Soter, became the first queen of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt. Berenice travelled to Egypt as a lady-in-waiting to Eurydice, Ptolemy I's wife. Ptolemy I married Berenice in 317 BC.
Berenice II Queen Ptolemaic (c. 267 BC – c. 221 BC) The daughter of Magas of Cyrene and Queen Apama II. Her husband, Demetrius the Fair, a Macedonian prince, moved to Cyrene where he became the lover of her mother Apama. So Berenice had him killed in Apama's bedroom. Afterwards she married the Egyptian king, Ptolemy III Euergetes.
Berenice III Queen Ptolemaic (120–80 BC) She ruled jointly with her uncle/husband Ptolemy X Alexander I (101 BC–88 BC). After Ptolemy X died, Ptolemy IX Lathyros reclaimed the throne, but when he died in 81 BC, Berenice took over the throne. The Roman Republic intervened and forced her to marry Ptolemy XI Alexander II, but he had her killed 19 days later.
Berenice IV Queen Ptolemaic (77 BC – 55 BC) Reigned 57 BC – 55 BC. She was a daughter of Ptolemy XII and Cleopatra V. After Cleopatra V's death, Berenice assumed the throne but was forced to marry Seleucus VII Kybiosaktes. So she had him murdered to remain sole ruler. After Ptolemy XII retook the throne with the aid of Roman soldiers, he had Berenice executed.
Betrest Queen 1st dynasty (fl. c. 30th century BC) Betrest was the mother of the pharaoh Semerkhet.
Bintanath Queen 19th dynasty (fl. c. 13th century BC) Also known as Bentanath. A daughter and later wife of the 19th dynasty Egyptian Pharaoh Ramesses II.
Buneb Prince 4th dynasty (fl. c. 26th century BC) A son of Nefermaat, the eldest son of pharaoh Sneferu and Itet.
Bunefer Queen 4th/5th dynasty (fl. c. 26th century BC) Bunefer's titles as a priestess of Shepseskaf mean she may have been a wife or daughter of Shepseskaf or she was the wife of king Thamphthis.

C[edit]

Name Main Title Dynasty Date Comment
Caesarion Prince/Pharaoh Ptolemaic 47 BC–30 BC He was the last king of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt (reigned 44 BC – 30 BC). He was the son of Cleopatra VII and Julius Caesar. He was killed on the orders of Octavian.Full name: Ptolemy XV Philopator Philometor Caesar.
Charmian Servant to Cleopatra Ptolemaic c. 1st century BC A trusted servant and advisor to the historical Cleopatra VII of Egypt. Died with Cleopatra.
Chephren Pharaoh 4th dynasty see Khafre
Cheops Pharaoh 4th dynasty see Khufu
Cleomenes of Naucratis Nomarch Ptolemaic c. 4th century BC A Greek of Naucratis in Egypt, was appointed by Alexander III of Macedon as nomarch of the Arabian district of Egypt and receiver of the tributes from all the districts of Egypt and the neighboring part of Africa (331 BC).
Cleopatra I Syra Queen Ptolemaic c. 204 BC – 176 BC Reigned 181 BC – 176 BC. She was the daughter of the Seleucid king Antiochus III and queen Laodice III. As part of a peace treaty, Antiochus III agreed to Cleopatra I marrying Ptolemy V (193 BC). Upon her Ptolemy V's death (181 BC), Cleopatra I ruled on behalf of her young son, Ptolemy VI.
Cleopatra II Queen Ptolemaic c. 185 BC – 116 BC Reigned 169 BC – 145 BC, 130 BC – 127 BC, 124 BC – 116 BC. Cleopatra II was the daughter of Ptolemy V and Cleopatra I. She was the sister of, and later married, both Ptolemy VI (175 BC) and Ptolemy VIII (145 BC).
Cleopatra III Queen Ptolemaic 161 BC – 101 BC Reigned 142 BC–131 BC and 127 BC – 101 BC. She was a daughter of Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra II. She married her uncle Ptolemy VIII. After the death of Ptolemy VIII (116 BC), Cleopatra III ruled with her eldest son Ptolemy IX and then with her second son Ptolemy X until Ptolemy X had her murdered.
Cleopatra IV Queen Ptolemaic c.135 BC – 112 BC Cleopatra IV was the daughter of Ptolemy VIII and Cleopatra III. Cleopatra IV married her brother Ptolemy IX (c.119 BC), and later the Seleucid prince, Antiochus IX Cyzicenus. Cleopatra IV was executed at the orders of Antiochus VIII.
Cleopatra V Tryphaena Queen Ptolemaic c. 95 BC – c. 57 BC Cleopatra V was an illegitimate daughter of Ptolemy IX or a daughter of Ptolemy X. In 79 BC she married Ptolemy XII.
Cleopatra VI Tryphaena Queen Ptolemaic c. 75 BC – c. 58 BC She was an older sister of Cleopatra VII and a daughter of Ptolemy XII and Cleopatra V.
Cleopatra VII Philopator Queen Ptolemaic 69 BC–30 BC Reigned 51 BC – 30 BC and mistress of Julius Caesar and Mark Antony. Cleopatra ruled jointly with her father Ptolemy XII and later with her brothers, Ptolemy XIII and Ptolemy XIV, whom she married. She had relationships with Julius Caesar and Mark Antony.
Cleopatra Selene I Queen Ptolemaic c.135 BC – 69 BC The daughter of the Egyptian king Ptolemy VIII and Cleopatra III. She was married to Ptolemy IX and later to the Seleucid kings, Antiochus VIII, Antiochus IX, and Antiochus X.
Cleopatra Selene II Queen Ptolemaic 40 BC – 6 AD The only daughter of Cleopatra VII and Roman triumvir Mark Antony. She married King Juba II of Numidia. Sometimes called Cleopatra VIII.
Cleopatra Thea Ptolemaic Princess
Seleucid Queen
Ptolemaic c. 2nd century BC A daughter of Ptolemy VI of Egypt and Cleopatra II. She ruled Syria from 125 BC after the death of Demetrius II Nicator. She eventually ruled in co-regency with her son Antiochus VIII Grypus, who poisoned her in 121 or 120 BC.

D[edit]

Name Main Title Dynasty Date Comment
Dakhamunzu Queen 18th dynasty (fl. c. 14th century BC) Also called Dahamunzu. An Egyptian queen known from the Hittite annals The Deeds of Suppiluliuma, which were composed by Suppiluliuma I's son Mursili II. The identity of this queen has not yet been established with any degree of certainty and Dakhamunzu has variously been identified as either Nefertiti, Meritaten or Ankhesenamen.
Dagi Vizier 11th dynasty (fl. c. 21st century BC) An Egyptian vizier of the 11th dynasty during the reign of Mentuhotep II.
Dedi Magician 4th dynasty (fl. c. 26th century BC) A soothsayer and magician in an Ancient Egyptian tale set in the era of Khufu, one of a number of stories to be found in the Westcar Papyrus.
Dedumose I Pharaoh 13th dynasty (fl. c. mid-17th century BC) A Pharaoh of Egypt during the 13th dynasty. Also known as Tutimaios.
Dedumose II Pharaoh 16th dynasty (fl. c. mid-17th century BC) A native Egyptian king of the 16th Theban dynasty during the Second Intermediate Period. His Horus name was Djedneferre.
Demetrius the Fair King of Cyrene Ptolemaic (c. 285 BC – c.249 BC) Reigned 250 BC – c. 249 BC. He was a son of King Demetrius I of Macedon and Ptolemais. When the Cyrenaean king Magas died in 250 BC, his widow, Apama II summoned Demetrius from Macedonia to become king of Cyrenaica and marry her daughter Berenice II. Shortly after his marriage to Berenice, Demetrius and Apama became lovers. In a jealous rage, Berenice killed Demetrius. Also known as Demetrius the Handsome.
Den Pharaoh 1st dynasty (fl. c. 30th century BC) He was the son of Queen Merneith. He was the first to use the title King of the Two Lands, and the first depicted as wearing the double crowns.
Didia High Priest of Ptah 19th dynasty (fl. c. mid-13th century BC) High Priest of Ptah during the reign of the 19th dynasty pharaoh, Ramesses II. Didia succeeded his father Pahemnetjer into the office.
Djaty Prince 4th dynasty (fl. c. 26th century BC) Djaty was a son of Queen Meresankh II and either pharaoh Djedefre or pharaoh Khafra. Also known as Djati, Zaty, Zati.
Djau Vizier 6th dynasty (fl. c. 23rd century BC) He was a member of an influential family from Abydos; his mother was the vizier Nebet. His two sisters Ankhesenpepi I and Ankhesenpepi II married Pharaoh Pepi I.
Djedefhor Prince 4th dynasty (fl. c. 26th century BC) He was a son of Pharaoh Khufu and brother of pharaohs Djedefre and Khafre. Also known as Hordjedef.
Djedefptah Pharaoh 4th dynasty see Thamphthis
Djedefre Pharaoh 4th dynasty (fl. c. 26th century BC) He reigned c. 2566 BC – c. 2558 BC, the son and immediate successor of Khufu. Djedefre was the first king to use the title Son of Ra, which is seen as an indication of the growing popularity of the cult of the solar god Ra. Also known as Radjedef.
Djedhor Pharaoh 30th dynasty (fl. c. 4th century BC) He reigned 362–360 BC, the son and immediate successor of Nakhtnebef. Also known as Djedher, Takhos and Teos.
Djedi Prince 4th dynasty (fl. c. 26th century BC) He was a son of Rahotep and Nofret and nephew of the pharaoh Khufu.
Djediufankh Priest An ancient Egyptian priest who lived between 2,000 and 4,000 years ago.
Djedkare Isesi Pharaoh 5th dynasty Reigned c. 2414 BC – c. 2375 BC Built his pyramid at Saqqara instead of Abusir. Also referred to as Tancheres.
Djedkare Shemai Pharaoh 7t dynasty (fl. c. 22nd century BC) A 7th dynasty king of Egypt during the First Intermediate Period.
Djedkhonsuefankh High Priest of Amun 21st dynasty (fl. c. mid-11th century BC) High Priest of Amun in Thebes. He was a son of Pinedjem I and succeeded his brother Masaherta during a time of great turmoil in the city of Thebes.
Djedptahiufankh Prophet of Amun 22nd dynasty (fl. c. mid-10th century BC) Served as the 3rd or 4th Prophet of Amun and was the husband of Nestanebtishru (who was the daughter of Pinudjem II and Neskhons) during the reign of pharaoh Shoshenq.
Djefatnebti Queen 3rd dynasty (fl. c. 27th century BC) Probably a wife of the 3rd dynasty Egyptian king Huni.
Djefatsen Princess 4th dynasty (fl. c. 26th century BC) A daughter of Nefermaat, the eldest son of pharaoh Sneferu and Itet.
Djehuti Pharaoh 16th dynasty (fl. c. late-17th century BC) An Egyptian pharaoh belonging to the Theban 16th dynasty based in Upper Egypt during the Second Intermediate period. Also called Djehuty Sekhemresementawy or Thuty.
Djehuty General 18th dynasty (fl. c. mid-15th century BC) A general under the Egyptian king Thutmosis III in the 18th dynasty. He led Egyptian forces in the capture of Joffa (modern Jaffa) in Canaan. Also referred to as Thuti or Thutii.
Djer Pharaoh 1st dynasty (fl. c. 31st century BC) The second or third pharaoh of the 1st dynasty of Egypt.
Djeseretnebti Queen 3rd dynasty (fl. c. 27th century BC) Wife of pharaoh Sekhemkhet from the 3rd dynasty. They were possibly the parents of pharaoh Khaba, Sekhemkhet's successor.
Djet Pharaoh 1st dynasty (fl. c. 30th century BC) An Egyptian pharaoh of the 1st dynasty. Also referred to as Wadj, Zet, and Uadji or Uenephes.
Djoser Pharaoh 3rd dynasty (reigned c. 2668 BC – c. 2649 BC) The best-known pharaoh of the 3rd dynasty of Egypt. He commissioned his official, Imhotep, to build the Step Pyramid for him at Saqqara. Also referred to as Netjerikhet, Tosarthros, Zoser, Dzoser, Zozer, Dsr, Djeser, Djésèr, Horus-Netjerikhet, and Horus-Netjerichet.
Duaenhor Prince 4th dynasty (fl. c. 26th century BC) He was probably a son of Prince Kawab (son of Khufu) and Hetepheres II.
Duaenre Vizier 4th dynasty (fl. c. 26th century BC) Duaenre was the son of King Khafre and Queen Meresankh III.
Duatentopet (or Tentopet) Queen 20th dynasty (fl. c. mid-12th century BC) The wife of Pharaoh Ramesses IV and mother of Ramesses V.
Duathathor-Henuttawy Princess / Queen 21st dynasty (fl. c. early-11th century BC) Probably the daughter of Ramesses XI, last king of the 20th dynasty, and queen Tentamun. She married Pinedjem I, the Theban High Priest of Amun who effectively ruled Upper Egypt during the reign of Ramesses XI.

E[edit]

Name Main Title Dynasty Date Comment
Eratosthenes Mathematician Ptolemaic c. 276 BC – c. 195 BC Eratosthenes was born in Cyrene (in modern-day Libya). He was the third chief librarian of the Great Library of Alexandria, the center of science and learning in the ancient world, and died in the capital of Ptolemaic Egypt.
Euclid of Alexandria Mathematician Ptolemaic (fl. c. late 4th century BC) A Greek mathematician, known as the "Father of Geometry". He was active in Alexandria during the reign of Ptolemy I. In his best known work, Elements, Euclid deduced the principles of what is now called Euclidean geometry. Euclid also wrote on perspective, conic sections, spherical geometry, number theory and rigor.
Eurydice Queen Ptolemaic (fl. c. late 4th century BC) A daughter of the Macedonian general Antipater and wife of Ptolemy, the son of Lagus, later Ptolemy I of Egypt. She married Ptolemy around 320 BC and was the mother of Ptolemy Keraunos, Meleager, Ptolemais and Lysandra.

G[edit]

Name Main Title Dynasty Date Comment
Ganymedes Tutor of Arsinoe IV, Military Commander Ptolemaic (fl. c. 60 BC – 47 BC) Tutor of Cleopatra VII's half-sister and rival, Arsinoë IV. During the civil war Ganymedes commanded Arsinoës' forces. In 47 BC Caesar won a decisive battle against Ganymedes who perished after fleeing the battle.
Gautseshen Princess 21st dynasty (fl. c. late-11th century BC) An Egyptian priestess, daughter of Menkheperre, High Priest of Amun. Her mother was Princess Isetemkheb, a daughter of Pharaoh Psusennes I.
Gilukhipa Queen 18th dynasty (fl. c. early-14th century BC) A daughter of Shuttarna II, king of Mitanni. To assist with political relations between the two states, Gilukhipa was sent by Shuttarna II to Egypt to marry the 18th dynasty pharaoh Amenhotep III. Her name is sometimes written as Gilukhipa, Kilu-Hepa, or Kirgipa.

H[edit]

Name Main Title Dynasty Date Comment
Hakor (or Akoris) Pharaoh 29th dynasty reigned 393 BC – 380 BC Hakor overthrew his predecessor Psammuthes. Hakor revolted against his overlord, the Persian King Artaxerxes, and with the support of Athenian mercenaries held off the Persians in a three-year war between 385 and 383 BC.
Hannu Egyptian noble 11th dynasty 21st to 20th century BC Served as m-r-pr "majordomus" under Mentuhotep II and Mentuhotep III.
Hapuseneb High Priest of Amun 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-15th century BC High priest from the time of Hatshepsut.
Harkhebi Astronomer Ptolemaic fl. c. 3rd century BC An astronomer who lived in Ptolemaic Egypt during the rule of the Ptolemaic dynasty.
Harkhuf Governor 6th dynasty fl. c. 23rd century BC Governor of Upper Egypt and overseer of caravans. His primary business was trade with Nubia, forging political bonds with local leaders and preparing the ground for an Egyptian expansion into Nubia. Also known as Herkhuf or Hirkhuf.
Harsiese High Priest of Ptah 21st dynasty fl. c. late-11th century BC He was a contemporary of Pharaoh Psusennes I.
Harsiese Hedjkheperre Setepenamun Pharaoh 23rd dynasty fl. c. mid-9th century BC King of Thebes during the early years of the reign of 22nd dynasty pharaoh Osorkon II.
Harsiese High Priest of Amun 22nd dynasty fl. c. late-9th century BC A High Priest of Amun during the reigns of the pharaohs Osorkon II, Shoshenq III and Pedubast I.
Harsiotef King of Meroe fl. c. early 4th-century BC A Kushite King of Meroe (reigned c. 404 BC – c. 369 BC). Harsiotef was probably the son of Queen Atasamale and King Amanineteyerike. His wives were Batahaliye and probably Pelkha.
Harwa Chief Steward 25th dynasty ca 8th century BC Chief Steward of Amenirdis I. His tomb, TT37, is located in El-Assasif, part of the Theban Necropolis, on the West Bank of the Nile, opposite to Luxor.
Hatshepsut Queen 18th dynasty reigned c. 1479 BC – c. 1458 BC Wife of Tuthmose II. Served as regent for her stepson Tuthmose III and eventually had herself depicted as Pharaoh.
Hatshepsut-Merytre Queen 18th dynasty see Merytre-Hatshepsut
Hedjetnebu Princess 5th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC Her father was Pharaoh Djedkare. Also known as Hedjetnub.
Hekenuhedjet Queen 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC Wife of Pharaoh Khafra. Her son was the vizier Sekhemkare.
Hemaka Royal Seal-bearer 1st dynasty fl. c. 30th century BC An important official during the long reign of Pharaoh Den.
Hemetre Princess 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC She may have been a daughter or granddaughter of Khafre. She did not hold the title king's wife.. She is mainly known from her tomb, which is located in the central field of Giza.
Hemiunu Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A son of Prince Nefermaat and his wife Itet. He is believed to be the architect of the Great Pyramid of Giza, Egypt.
Henutmehyt Priestess 19th dynasty fl. c. mid-13th century BC An Egyptian Theban priestess who lived during the 19th dynasty.
Henutmire Queen 19th dynasty fl. c. mid-13th century BC A princess and queen, one of the eight wives of 19th dynasty pharaoh Ramesses II. Either a daughter or a younger sister of Ramesses II as well as his wife.
Henutsen Queen 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC She was a daughter of Pharaoh Sneferu and married her elder half-brother Khufu.
Henuttaneb Princess 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC A daughter of Egyptian 18th dynasty pharaoh Amenhotep III and Queen Tiye. She was a sister of Pharaoh Akhenaten.
Henuttawy Princess 19th dynasty fl. c. mid-13th century BC She was a daughter of Pharaoh Ramesses II and Queen Nefertari.
Henuttawy Princess 21st dynasty fl. c. mid-11th century BC Her father was Pinedjem I, High Priest of Amun and de facto ruler of Southern Egypt and her mother was Duathathor-Henuttawy, a daughter of Ramesses XI.
Henuttawy God's Wife of Amun 20th dynasty fl. c. early-10th century BC A God's Wife of Amun during the 21st dynasty. Her father was Pinedjem II, High Priest of Amun and her mother was Isetemkheb, Singer of Amun.
Henutwati Queen 20th dynasty fl. c. mid-12th century BC The Great Royal Wife of Ramesses V. Also known as Ta-Henutwati.
Hepu Vizier 18th dynasty fl. c. late-15th century BC Hepu held office during the reign of Pharaoh Thutmose IV.
Heqanakht Viceroy of Kush 19th dynasty fl. c. 13-12th century BC Viceroy of Kush during the reign of Ramesses II. His titles include: King's son of Kush, overseer of the Southern Lands, Fan-bearer on the king's right, Messenger to every land, etc.
Herihor General, High Priest of Amun, Pharaoh 20th dynasty fl. c. early-11th century BC An Egyptian general and High Priest of Amun at Thebes during the reign of Ramesses XI. Herihor played an integral role in restoring order by ousting Pinehesy, viceroy of Nubia, from Thebes. He then assumed a number of titles, from high priest to vizier, before claiming to be pharaoh, although his power base remained limited to Thebes.
Herneith Queen 1st dynasty fl. c. 31st century BC Queen consort to Djer.
Hesy-Ra Physician, noble man 3rd dynasty fl. c. 27th century BC Hersy-Ra was an official, physician and scribe who served under the pharaoh Djoser.
Hetepheres Princess 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC She was a daughter of pharaoh Sneferu and his half-sister, Queen Hetepheres I. Hetepheres married her younger half-brother Ankhhaf, who was a vizier.
Hetepheres I Queen 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A daughter of pharaoh Huni, Hetepheres is considered to have been the wife of Sneferu. Hetepheres was the mother of Princess Hetepheres and King Khufu.
Hetepheres II Queen 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A daughter of Khufu, during his reign she married her brother, the Crown Prince Kawab, with whom she had at least one child, a daughter named Meresankh III.
Hetephernebti Queen 3rd dynasty fl. c. 27th century BC The only known wife of Pharaoh Djoser.
Hewernef Vizier 20th dynasty fl. c. early-12th century He served during the reign of the 20th dynasty pharaoh Ramesses III.
Hor Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. mid-18th century An Egyptian king of the 13th dynasty. Also known as Au-ib-Rê.
Hor-Aha Pharaoh 1st dynasty fl. 31st century BC Probably the second pharaoh of the 1st dynasty of Egypt.
Horbaef King's Son 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC Horbaef was a son of Pharaoh Khufu. He married his half-sister Meresankh II and they had daughters named Nefertkau III and Nebty-tepites. Also known as Baefhor or Horbaf.
Horus (or Horemhab or Haremhab) Pharaoh 18th dynasty fl. c. late-14th to early-13th century BC Last pharaoh of the 18th dynasty (reigned c. 1319 BC – c. 1292 BC). Before he became pharaoh, Horemheb was the commander in chief of the army for Tutankhamen and Ay. He appointed his vizier Paramesse as his successor, who would assume the throne as Ramesses I.
Hori I High Priest of Ptah 20th dynasty fl. c. late-13th century BC He served at the very end of the reign of the 19th dynasty pharaoh Ramesses II. Hori succeeded Neferronpet in office. Hori was a son of prince Khaemwaset and hence a grandson of Ramesses II.
Hori I Viceroy of Kush 20th dynasty fl. c. early-12th century BC Hori, son of Kama, was Viceroy of Kush under the 19th dynasty pharaoh Siptah. He continued to serve under the 20th dynasty pharaohs Setnakhte and Ramesses III.
Hori II Vizier 19th/20th dynasty fl. c. early to mid-12th century BC He served during the reigns of the 19th and 20th dynasty pharaohs Sethi II, Siptah, Tawosret, Setnakhte and Ramesses III. Hori II was the son of the High Priest of Ptah Hori I and the grandson of Prince Khaemweset.
Hori II Viceroy of Kush 20th dynasty fl. c. mid-12th century BC Ason of the Viceroy of Kush, Hori I, and also served as Viceroy of Kush.
Hornakht King's Son 22nd dynasty fl. c. mid-9th century BC A son of pharaoh Osorkon II. He was appointed by his father to the office of chief priest of Amun at Tanis to strengthen Osorkon's authority in Lower Egypt but Hornakht died at age 10.
Hotepibre Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. 17th century BC Hotepibre Siharnedjheritef was likely a son of Ameny Qemau.
Hotepsekhemwy Pharaoh 2nd dynasty fl. c. 29th century BC The first king of the 2nd dynasty of Egypt. (or Boethos)
Hsekiu King pre-dynastic Also known as Seka, was a Predynastic ancient Egyptian king who ruled in the Nile Delta.
Hugronaphor Noble man Ptolemaic fl. c. late-3rd century BC A Nubian noble who led Upper Egypt's secession from the rule of Ptolemy IV Philopator in 205 BC. His name is some times given as Hurganophor, Haronnophris, Harmachis, Hyrgonaphor, Herwennefer, or Horwennefer.
Hui Divine Adoratrice 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-15th century She was the mother of Merytre-Hatshepsut, the Great Royal Wife of Pharaoh Thutmose III.
Hunefer Priest 19th dynasty fl. c. 13th century BC Hunefer was "Scribe of Divine Offerings", "Overseer of Royal Cattle", and steward of Pharaoh Seti I. Known for his copy of the Egyptian funerary Book of the Dead.
Huni Pharaoh 3rd dynasty fl. c. 27th century BC The last pharaoh of Egypt of the 3rd dynasty. He was the successor to Khaba.
Huy High Priest of Ptah 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-13th century BC High Priest of Ptah during the reign of the 19th dynasty pharaoh Ramesses II. Huy was succeeded by Pahemnetjer.
Huya Steward of Queen Tiye 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC He was the Superintendent of the Royal Harem, Superintendent of the Treasury and Superintendent of the House, all titles that are associated with Queen Tiye, mother of Akhenaten.

I[edit]

Name Main Title Dynasty Date Comment
Iaret Queen 18th dynasty fl. c. early-14th century BC The daughter of Pharaoh Amenhotep II and wife of Thutmose IV.
Ibi Steward 26th dynasty fl. c. mid-7th century BC Chief Steward to the Adorer of the God, Nitocris I, during the reign of Pharaoh Psamtik I. His name is sometimes written as Aba or Abe.
Ibiau Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. 17th century BC Ibiau, Ibiaw or Wahibre Ibiau was an Egyptian king of the 13th Dynasty.
Imhotep Architect, Vizier 3rd dynasty fl. c. 27th century BC He served under King Djoser as chancellor to the pharaoh and High Priest of Re at Heliopolis. He was revered by later Egyptian dynasties as an architect, engineer, physician, poet and philosopher.
Imyremeshaw Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. late-18th century BC Imyremeshaw Smenkhkare was an Egyptian king of the 13th dynasty.
Inaros Rebel Leader Persian Occupation fl. c. mid-5th century BC An Egyptian rebel ruler who was the son of a Libyan prince named Psamtik. In 460 BC, he revolted against the Persians with the help of his Athenian allies and defeated the Persian army. He was defeated in 454 BC by a Persian army led by Megabyzus. Inaros was captured and executed in 454 BC. Also known as Ienheru, or Inarus.
Inenek-Inti Queen 6th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC A wife of Pharaoh Pepi I Meryre of the 6th dynasty.
Ineni (or Ini) Queen 13th dynasty fl. c. mid-17th century BC Her husband was probably king Merneferre Ay.
Ineni Architect 18th dynasty fl. late-16th and early 15th century BC An Egyptian architect and government official of the 18th dynasty, responsible for major construction projects under the pharaohs Amenhotep I, Thutmose I, Thutmose II, Hatshepsut and Thutmose III. Ineni expanded the Temple of Karnak and probably oversaw the construction of Amenhotep I's tomb and mortuary temple.
Inetkawes Princess 3rd dynasty fl. c. 27th century BC She was the only known child of Pharaoh Djoser and Queen Hetephernebti.
Ini Menkheperre Local King Third Intermediate Period fl. c. mid-8th century BC Probably pharaoh Rudamun's successor at Thebes but was not a member of his predecessor's 23rd dynasty. Unlike the 23rd dynasty rulers, he was a local king who ruled only at Thebes. Also known as Iny Si-Ese Meryamun.
Inkaef Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A son of Nefermaat, the eldest son of pharaoh Sneferu and Itet.
Intef I Pharaoh 11th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC Intef I Sehertawy was local Egyptian ruler at Thebes, Egypt. He was the first of his dynasty to assume the title of Pharaoh. His authority was contested by the other nomarchs of Egypt, but he had gained control over Koptos, Dendera and the three nomes of Hierakonpolis by the end of his reign.
Intef II Pharaoh 11th dynasty reigned c. 2118 BC – c. 2069 BC Intef II Wahankh's capital was located at Thebes, Egypt. After the death of the nomarch Ankhtifi, Intef II was able to unite all the southern nomes down to the First Cataract. By the time Intef II died, he left behind a strong government in Thebes which controlled the whole of Upper Egypt.
Intef III Pharaoh 11th dynasty reigned c. 2069 BC – c. 2060 BC Intef III Nakhtnebtepnefer was a king during the First Intermediate Period.
Intef V Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. late-18th century BC Intef V Sehetepkare was an Egyptian king. His name is also written as Antef V or Inyotef V.
Intef VI Pharaoh 17th dynasty fl. c. early-16th century BC Intef VI Sekhemrewepmaat ruled from Thebes. He lived during the Second Intermediate Period, when Egypt was ruled by multiple kings. His name is also written as Antef VI.
Intef VII Pharaoh 17th dynasty fl. c. mid-16th century BC Intef VII Nubkheperre ruled from Thebes during the Second Intermediate Period, when Egypt was divided by rival dynasties including the Hyksos in Lower Egypt. He was the brother of Intef VI and perhaps the son of Sekhemre Shedtawy Sobekemsaf I. His name is also written as Antef VII.
Intef VIII Pharaoh 17th dynasty fl. c. mid-16th century BC Intef VIII Sekhemreheruhirmaat ruled during the Second Intermediate Period, when Egypt was divided between the Theban based 17th dynasty in Upper Egypt and the Hyksos 15th dynasty who controlled Lower and part of Middle Egypt. His name is also written as Antef VIII.
Intef General 11th dynasty fl. c. 21st century BC Served under king Mentuhotep II.
Intefiqer Vizier 12th dynasty fl. c. mid-20th century BC An Egyptian noble who was overseer of the city and vizier under the Pharaohs Amenemhet I and Senusret I.
Ipu Royal Nurse 18th dynasty fl. c. late-16th century BC She was the mother of Queen Satiah, Great Royal Wife of Pharaoh Thutmose IV.
Iput Queen 5th/ 6th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC A daughter of Unas, the last king of 5th dynasty of Egypt. She married Teti, the first pharaoh of the 6th dynasty of Egypt. Their son was Pepi I Meryre and she acted for him as a regent after her husband's death.
Iput II Queen 6th dynasty fl. c. 23rd century BC Wife of king Pepi II Neferkare.
Iry-Hor Pharaoh 1st dynasty (see Hor-Aha)
Isesi-ankh Prince 5th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC A son of king Djedkare Isesi.
Isesu Princess 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A daughter of Nefermaat, the eldest son of pharaoh Sneferu and Itet.
Iset Queen 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-15th century BC She was a secondary wife or concubine of Thutmose II. Iset was the mother of Thutmose III, the only son of Thutmose II.
Iset Princess 18th dynasty fl. c. late-15th century BC A daughter of Pharaoh Thutmose III and his Great Royal Wife Merytre-Hatshepsut.
Iset Princess-Queen 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC Daughter of Amenhotep III and Tiye. She was a sister of Akhenaten. She later married her father.
Iset Princess, God's Wife of Amun 20th dynasty fl. c. mid-12th century BC Daughter of Pharaoh Ramesses VI and Nubkhesbed, and a sister of Pharaoh Ramesses VII. Also known as Aset, or Isis.
Iset Ta-Hemdjert Queen 20th dynasty fl. c. mid-12th century BC She was the wife of Ramesses III and the mother of both Ramesses IV and Ramesses VI.
Isetemkheb Princess 21st dynasty fl. c. late 11th century BC The sister-wife of the Theban High Priest of Amun, Pinudjem II. Isetemkheb was a daughter of the Theban High Priest of Amun and general, Prince Menkheperre, and his wife, Isetemkheb.
Isetnofret I Queen 19th dynasty fl. c. mid-13th century BC One of the wives of Pharaoh Ramesses II and was the mother of his heir, Merneptah. Alternatively called: Isis-nofret or Isitnofret.
Isetnofret II Queen 19th dynasty fl. c. late-13th century BC One of the wives of Pharaoh Merneptah. Alternatively called: Isis-nofret or Isitnofret.
Isidorus Priest Roman Period fl. c. 2nd century AD A native ancient Egyptian priest. He led the native Egyptian revolt against Roman rule during the reign of emperor Marcus Aurelius.
Isu Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC He was a son of Nefermaat, the eldest son of pharaoh Sneferu and Itet.
Itet Princess 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A noblewoman, a wife of Prince Nefermaat, and daughter-in-law of pharaoh Sneferu. Her name is also written as Atet.
Itisen Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A son of Nefermaat, the eldest son of pharaoh Sneferu, and of Itet.
Itu Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC He was a son of Prince Rahotep and Nofret and grandson of pharaoh Sneferu.
Iufaa Priest 26th dynasty fl. c. 5th century BC An Egyptian priest and administer of palaces. His undisturbed tomb was found in 1994.
Iufni Pharaoh 13th dynasty The only record of this Pharaoh comes from the Turin King List.
Iunmin I Vizier 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC He was possibly a son of king Khafre and served as vizier during the reign of his brother, Menkaure. His name is also written as Yunmin, Iuenmin, and Minuen.
Iunre Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC He was a son of king Khafre. His name is also written as Yunre.
Iuput High Priest of Amun 22nd dynasty fl. c. mid-10th century BC Served during the reigns of his father Pharaoh Shoshenq I and his brother Osorkon I. He was also general, army commander and governor of Upper Egypt.
Iuput I Pharaoh 23rd dynasty fl. c. late-9th century A pharaoh of Upper Egypt and a co-regent with his father, Pedubast I.
Iuput II Local Ruler Third Intermediate Period fl. c. mid-8th century BC The ruler of Leontopolis in the Egyptian Delta region. He was an ally of Tefnakht of Sais who resisted the invasion of Lower Egypt by the 25th dynasty Kushite king Piye. After Piye defeated Tefnakht's coalition and conquered Lower Egypt, Iuput II remained in power as the local governor of Leontopolis. Also known as Yuput II.
Iynefer Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A son of pharaoh Sneferu.

K[edit]

Name Main Title Dynasty Date Comment
Ka (pharaoh) King Pre-dynastic fl. c. 32nd-31st century BC Ka, also Sekhem Ka or Ka-Sekhen, was a Predynastic pharaoh of Upper Egypt.
Kaemqed Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A son of princess Nefertnesu and grandson of Pharaoh Sneferu.
Kaemsekhem Director of the Palace 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A son of prince Kawab and Hetepheres II and grandson of the pharaoh Khufu. He served as the director of the palace.
Kagemni I Vizier 3rd dynasty fl. c. 27th century BC He was a vizier to both Pharaoh Huni and Pharaoh Sneferu.
Kagemni (II) Vizier 6th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC Vizier during the reign of king Teti. Kagemni's wife Nebtynubkhet Sesheshet was probably the daughter of Teti.
Kakhent Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A son of Nefermaat, the eldest son of pharaoh Sneferu and Itet.
Kamose Pharaoh 17th dynasty fl. c. mid-16th century BC The last king of the Theban 17th dynasty (reigned c.1555 BC – c.1550 BC). He was probably the son of Seqenenre Tao II and Ahhotep I and brother of Ahmose I, founder of the Eighteenth Dynasty.
Kanefer Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC The son of pharaoh Sneferu.
Kapes Queen 22nd dynasty fl. c. early 9th century BC Wife of pharaoh Takelot I and the mother of Pharaoh Osorkon II.
Karomama Queen 22nd dynasty fl. c. mid-10th century BC Wife of pharaoh Sheshonk I and the mother of Pharaoh Osorkon I. Her name is sometimes given as Karamat
Karomama I Queen 22nd dynasty fl. c. mid-9th century BC Wife of pharaoh Osorkon II. Karomama was probably a daughter of Pharaoh Takelot I.
Karomama II Queen 23rd dynasty fl. c. mid-9th century BC Wife of pharaoh Takelot II. Karomama was a daughter of the High Priest of Amun Nimlot and his wife Tentsepeh. Karomama was the mother of pharaoh Osorkon III.
Karomama Meritmut God's Wife of Amun 22nd dynasty fl. c. mid-9th century BC A God's Wife of Amun during the 22nd dynasty. Possibly a daughter of Pharaoh Osorkon II.
Kashta King of Kush Second Intermediate Period fl. c. mid-8th century BC A king of the Kushite Dynasty (reigned c. 760 BC – c. 752 BC). Kashta ruled Nubia and he also exercised a strong degree of control over Upper Egypt. During his reign, the native Kushite population adopted Egyptian traditions, religion and culture.
Kawab Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC He was the eldest son of Pharaoh Khufu and Queen Meritites I and half-brother of pharaohs Djedefre and Khafre.
Kekheretnebti Princess 5th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC A daughter of Pharaoh Djedkare Isesi.
Keminub Queen 12th dynasty or Second Intermediate Period fl. c. late-20th century BC An Egyptian noblewoman with the title king's wife who was buried next to the pyramid of the 12th dynasty pharaoh Amenemhet II at Dahshur. For that reason it has been suggested she was his wife. May date to a later period however.
Khaba Pharaoh 3rd dynasty fl. c. 27th century BC He was successor to the pharaoh Sekhemkhet and he was probably a son of Sekhemkhet.
Khabash Noble Persian Occupation fl. mid-4th century BC A noble based at Sais in Lower Egypt. During the second Persian occupation of Egypt (343–332 BC) he led a revolt against the Persian rule with his eldest son. During the 330s BC, Khabash led an invasion into the kingdom of Kush but was defeated by king Nastasen. Also known as Khababash.
Khabekhnet Artisan 19th dynasty fl. c. late-13th century BC He served during the reigns of the pharaoh Ramesses II.
Khaemtir Vizier 19th dynasty fl. c. late-13th century BC He served during the reigns of the pharaohs Amenmesse and Seti II.
Khaemweset Prince 18th dynasty fl. c. early-14th century BC He was probably the son of Pharaoh Amenhotep II.
Khaemweset Prince, High Priest of Ptah 19th dynasty fl. c. late-13th century BC A son of Ramesses II and queen Isetnofret. He was a Sem-Priest and later High Priest of Ptah and governor of Memphis. Khaemwaset restored the monuments of earlier kings, such as Shepseskaf, Sahure and Nyuserre Ini, and restored the pyramid of Unas at Saqqara.
Khaemweset Prince, High Priest of Ptah 20th dynasty fl. c. early-12th century BC A son of Pharaoh Ramesses III. He was a priest of Ptah in Memphis.
Khafra Pharaoh 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC He reigned c.2558 BC – c.2532 BC. He was a brother of Djedefre. Khafra had his capital at Memphis and built the second largest pyramid at Giza and is thought to have built the Great Sphinx.
Khamerernebty Princess 5th dynasty fl. c. 25th century BC A daughter of the 5th dynasty King Nyuserre Ini and was married to the King's vizier, Ptahshepses.
Khamerernebty I Queen 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC She was probably a wife of the pharaoh Khafra and the mother of Menkaura and Khamerernebty II.
Khamerernebty II Queen 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC She was probably the daughter of Pharaoh Khafre and Queen Khamerernebty I and was married to her brother Menkaura.
Khamudi Pharaoh 15th dynasty fl. c. mid-16th century The last pharaoh of the Hyksos 15th dynasty of Egypt (reigned c.1555 BC – c.1544 BC), who ruled in the northern portion of Egypt. He was defeated by the founding pharaoh of the 18th dynasty, Ahmose I.
Khasekhemwy King 2nd dynasty fl. c. 27th century BC Thought to be the last king of the 2nd dynasty of Egypt. He led several significant military campaigns and built several monuments, still extant, mentioning war against the Northerners.
Khawy Guardian in the Place of Truth 19th dynasty fl. c. mid-13th century BC A guardian in the Place of Truth and servitor of Amun of Opet (Luxor) during the reign of Egyptian pharaoh, Ramesses II.
Khay Vizier 19th dynasty fl. c. mid-13th century BC A vizier in the latter part of pharaoh Ramesses II. Khay was the son of Hai and Nub-em-niut.
Khayu King Pre-dynastic Predynastic ancient Egyptian king who ruled in the Nile Delta.
Khedebneithirbinet I Queen 26th dynasty fl. c. late-7th century BC She was probably the wife of the 26th dynasty pharaoh Necho II. She was the mother of his successor, Psamtik II.
Khendjer Userkare Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. late 18th century BC Khendjer was the earliest known Semitic king of an Egyptian dynasty.
Khenemetneferhedjet I Weret Queen 12th dynasty fl. c. early-19th century BC A wife of King Senusret II and the mother of Senusret III.
Khenemetneferhedjet II Weret Queen 12th dynasty fl. c. mid-19th century BC A wife of King Senusret III.
Khenemetneferhedjet III Queen 12th dynasty fl. c. late-19th century BC She was the wife of King Amenemhet III.
Khensa Queen 25th dynasty fl. c. mid-8th century BC Khensa was the sister-wife of the Pharaoh Piye. Her name is sometimes written as Khenensaiuw.
Khentetka Queen 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC Khentetka was the wife of the pharaoh Djedefra.
Khenthap Queen 1st dynasty fl. c. 31st century BC Kenthap was the mother of Djer and was probably the wife of King Hor-Aha.
Khentimeresh Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A son of Nefermaat, the eldest son of pharaoh Sneferu, and Itet.
Khentkaus I Queen 4th dynasty fl. c. 25th century BC She was a daughter of Menkaure, possibly a wife of Shepseskaf and mother of Userkaf.
Khentkaus II Queen 5th dynasty fl. c. 25th century BC She was a wife of Egyptian Pharaoh Neferirkare Kakai. She was the mother of Neferefre and Nyuserre Ini.
Khenut Queen 5th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC A wife of King Unas.
Khety Nomarch 10th dynasty fl. c. 21st century BC Nomarch of Asyut under king Merykare.
Kheti Vizier 12th dynasty fl. c. late-19th century BC Vizier under king Amenemhet III.
Khnumhotep Royal Manicurist 5th dynasty Overseer of the Manicurists in the Palace of King Niuserre. Shares a tomb with Niankhkhnum.
Khnumhotep III Vizier 12th dynasty fl. c. early-19th century BC He was the son of the local governor Khnumhotep II, and was promoted high steward and then vizier under Senusret II.
Khufu Pharaoh 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC The second pharaoh of the 4th Dynasty (reigned c.2589 BC – c.2566 BC). He is generally accepted as being the builder of the Great Pyramid of Giza. Greek name: Cheops.
Khufukhaf Vizier 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC Khufukhaf was a son of Pharaoh Khufu and brother of pharaohs Djedefre and Khafre. His mother might have been Queen Henutsen. His wife was Nefertkau II and she was buried with him in Giza.
Khuit I Queen 5th dynasty fl. c. 25th century BC Khuit I was possibly the wife of Pharaoh Menkauhor Kaiu.
Khuit (II) Queen 6th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC Wife of King Teti.
Khyan Pharaoh 15th dynasty fl. c. early-16th century BC A king of the Hyksos 15th dynasty of Egypt. Also known as Seuserenre Khyan, Khian' or Khayan.
Kiya Queen 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC One of the wives of Pharaoh Akhenaten.

L[edit]

Name Main Title Dynasty Date Comment
Ladice Queen 26th dynasty fl. c. 6th century BC The daughter of the Greek Cyrenaean King Battus III and his wife Queen Pheretima. Ladice married Amasis II.
Lagus Ptolemaic fl. c. 4th century BC Married to Arsinoe, daughter of Meleager, and reputed father of Ptolemy I Soter.
Lysandra Princess Ptolemaic fl. c. 3rd century BC The daughter of Ptolemy I Soter and Eurydice, the daughter of Antipater.
Lysimachus Prince Ptolemaic fl. c. late 3rd century BC A son of king Ptolemy II Philadelphus and queen Arsinoe I. He survived both his brother Ptolemy III Euergetes and his nephew, Ptolemy IV Philopator, but was put to death by Sosibius, the minister and guardian of Ptolemy V Epiphanes.

M[edit]

Name Main Title Dynasty Date Comment
Maathorneferure Queen 19th dynasty fl. c. mid-13th century BC The daughter of the Hittite king Hattusili III and his wife Queen Pudukhepa. She was a sister of Hittite king Tudhaliya IV. Maathorneferure married the Egyptian 19th dynasty Pharaoh Ramesses II.
Maatkare Mutemhat God's Wife of Amun 21st dynasty fl. c. mid to late-11th century BC She was the daughter of High Priest of Amun, Pinedjem I, who was the de facto ruler of Southern Egypt from 1070 BC onwards.
Maatkare Queen 21st dynasty fl. c. late-10th century BC Wife of pharaoh Osorkon I and the mother of pharaoh Sheshonk II. Maatkare was a daughter of Psusennes II.
Magas of Cyrene King of Cyrene Ptolemaic fl. c. mid-3rd century BC Following the death of Ptolemy I, Magas tried to gain independence for Cyrene, until he crowned himself king around 276 BC. Magas and Antiochus agreed on a joint attack on Egypt but the armies of Ptolemy II defeated them. Magas managed to maintain Cyrene's independence until his death.
Mahu (noble) Noble 18th dynasty fl. c. 14th century BC Mahu was Chief of Police at Akhetaten.
Maia (or Matia) Wet-Nurse 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC The wet-nurse of the Egyptian 18th dynasty king Tutankhamun.
Maiherpri Noble 18th dynasty fl. c. late 15th century BC An Egyptian noble of Nubian origin. He probably lived during the rule of the 18th dynasty king Thutmose IV. He probably grew up in the royal nursery as a prince of a vassal territory and as an adult was an advisor or bodyguard to the pharaoh.
Malewiebamani King of Kush fl. c. mid-5th century BC A Kushite King of Meroe (reigned c.463 BC – c.435 BC). Malewiebamani's mother was probably Queen Saka'aye. Malewiebamani was the son of either Nasakhma (whom he succeeded) or Siaspiqa.
Manetho Historian, Priest Ptolemaic fl. c. mid-3rd century BC An Egyptian historian and priest from Sebennytos who lived during the Ptolemaic era. He was probably a priest of the sun god Ra at Heliopolis. Manetho wrote the Aegyptiaca (History of Egypt) which is of great interest to Egyptologists and used as evidence for the chronology of the reigns of pharaohs.
Masaharta High Priest of Amun 21st dynasty fl. c. mid-11th century BC He succeeded his father, Pinedjem I, who had been also been the de facto ruler of Upper Egypt from 1070 BC. Masaharta's mother was Duathathor-Henuttawy, the daughter of Ramesses XI.
Maya High Priest of Amun 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC High Priest of Amun during the reign of king Akhenaten.
Maya Treasurer 18th dynasty fl. c. late-14th century BC Overseer of the Treasury during the reign of the pharaohs Tutankhamun, Ay and Horemheb. Maya collected taxes and performed other services such as supervising the preparation of their tombs.
Mehytenweskhet Queen 26th dynasty fl. c. mid-7th century BC Daughter of the High Priest of Re Harsiese, and the Great Royal Wife of pharaoh Psamtik I. Mehytenweskhet was the mother of Necho II, the Divine Adoratrice of Amun Nitocris I and a daughter, Meryetneith.
Meketaten Princess 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC A daughter of Pharaoh Akhenaten and his wife Nefertiti.
Meketre Treasurer 11th dynasty fl. c. 21st century BC Chancellor (treasurer) and chief steward during the reign of the 11th dynasty Egyptian kings Mentuhotep II and Mentuhotep III.
Menes Pharaoh 1st dynasty fl. 31st century BC Pharaoh of the early dynastic period, credited by classical tradition with having united Upper and Lower Egypt, and being the founder of the 1st dynasty of Egypt.
Menhet Queen 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-15th century BC A minor foreign-born wife of pharaoh Thutmose III who was buried in a lavishly furnished rock-cut tomb in Wady Gabbanat el-Qurud.
Menkare Pharaoh 7th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC May have been a 7th dynasty king of Egypt during the First Intermediate Period.
Menkauhor Kaiu Pharaoh 5th dynasty fl. c. 25th century BC Menkauhor may have been a son of king Niuserre. Queen Meresankh IV and Queen Khuit I may have been consorts for Menkauhor. Menkauhor's successor, Djedkare Isesi, may have been his son.
Menkaure Pharaoh 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC He reigned c. 2532 BC – c. 2503 BC, and ordered the construction of the third and smallest of the Pyramids of Giza. His chief queen was Khamerernebty II. He was the successor of Khafre.
Menkheperraseneb I High Priest of Amun 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-15th century BC High Priest of Amun during the reign of pharaoh Thutmose III. He was possibly the uncle of Menkheperreseneb II.
Menkheperreseneb II High Priest of Amun 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-15th century BC High Priest of Amun, Superintendent of the Gold and Silver Treasuries and Chief of the Overseers of Craftsmen. He served during the reign of pharaoh Thutmose III.
Menkheperre Prince 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-15th century BC One of two known sons of Pharaoh Thutmose III and his wife Merytre-Hatshepsut.
Menkheperre High Priest of Amun 21st dynasty fl. c. late-11th century BC A son of pharaoh Pinedjem I and queen Henuttawy. He was the High Priest of Amun at Thebes and de facto ruler of southern Egypt. Menkheperre married his niece Isetemkheb, daughter of his brother Psusennes I and wife Wiay.
Menna Artisan, Scribe 18th dynasty fl. c. early-14th century BC An Egyptian artisan and "Scribe of the Fields of the Lord of the Two Lands" probably during the reign of the 18th dynasty king Thutmose IV.
Mentuherkhepeshef Prince 20th dynasty fl. c. early-12th century BC A prince during the 20th Dynasty of Egypt and one of the sons of Ramesses III and Iset Ta-Hemdjert.
Mentuherkhepeshef Prince 20th dynasty fl. c. late-12th century BC An Egyptian prince during the 20th dynasty, a son of Pharaoh Ramesses IX.
Mentuhotep Treasurer 12th dynasty fl. c. late-20th century BC An Egyptian official and treasurer under the 12th dynasty pharaoh Senusret I.
Mentuhotep Queen 16th dynasty fl. c. late-17th century BC She was possibly the queen consort of the pharaoh Djehuti Sekhemresementawy.
Mentuhotep I Pharaoh 11th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC A local Egyptian prince at Thebes who became the first acknowledged ruler of the 11th dynasty by assuming the title of first supreme chief of Upper Egypt and, later, declaring himself king over all Egypt.
Mentuhotep II Nebhepetre Pharaoh 11th dynasty fl. c. 21st century BC The son of Intef III and Iah. His wife was Tem. His only known son was Mentuhotep III. He was able to effectively reunite ancient Egypt for the first time since the 6th dynasty.
Mentuhotep III Sankhkare Pharaoh 11th dynasty fl. c. 21st century BC He continued the building program of his father Mentuhotep II.
Mentuhotep IV Nebtawyre Pharaoh 11th dynasty fl. c. 20th century BC The last king of the Egyptian 11th Dynasty (reigned c. 1997 BC – c. 1991 BC).
Mentuhotep V Sewedjara Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. late-18th century BC A pharaoh of Egypt in the 13th dynasty.
Mentuhotep VI Sankhenre Pharaoh 16th dynasty fl. c. late-17th century BC A pharaoh of Egypt of the 16th Theban dynasty based in Upper Egypt during the Second Intermediate Period. His predecessor was Sekhemre Sankhtawy Neferhotep III. Mentuhotep VI was succeeded by Nebiriau I.
Menwi Queen 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-15th century BC A minor foreign-born wife of the 18th dynasty Egyptian pharaoh Thutmose III who was buried in a lavishly furnished rock-cut tomb in Wady Gabbanat el-Qurud.
Merefnebef Vizier 6th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC He first served at the court of the pharaoh Teti, possibly became vizier during the reign of Userkare, and was dismissed during the reign of Pepi I. (or Unisankh and Fefi)
Merenhor Pharaoh 7th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC He may have been a 7th dynasty king of Egypt during the First Intermediate Period.
Merenre Nemtyemsaf I Pharaoh 6th dynasty fl. c. 23rd century BC Merenre was a son of Pepi I and Ankhesenpepi I.
Merenre Nemtyemsaf II Pharaoh 6th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC Briefly king during the 6th dynasty of Egypt (reigned c. 2184 BC – c. 2183 BC), succeeding his long-lived father Pepi II Neferkare.
Mereret Princess 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC She was a daughter of Rahotep and Nofret and niece of pharaoh Khufu.
Mereruka Vizier 6th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC He was the vizier to the pharaoh Teti and married Teti's daughter, Hert-watet-khet.
Meresamun Priestess fl. c. 8th century BC An ancient Egyptian singer-priestess in the inner sanctum at the temple in Karnak.
Meresankh I Queen 3rd dynasty fl. c. 27th century BC Possibly a lesser wife of pharaoh Huni. Meresankh was the mother of the 4th dynasty pharaoh Sneferu.
Meresankh II Queen 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC Meresankh II was a daughter of Khufu and Queen Meritites I. She was probably married her half-brother Djedefre, but it is also possible she married the pharaoh Khafra.
Meresankh III Queen 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC She was the daughter of Hetepheres II and Prince Kawab. She married king Khafra.
Meresankh IV Queen 5th dynasty fl. c. 25th century BC She could have been queen to king Menkauhor Kaiu or Djedkare Isesi.
Meret-Isesi Princess 5th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC Her father was Pharaoh Djedkare.
Meretseger Queen 12th dynasty fl. c. mid-19th century BC She was probably the wife of Senusret III. She was the first Egyptian queen consort to bear the title Great Royal Wife, which became the standard title for chief wives of pharaohs.
Merhotepre Ini Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. mid-17th century BC The son and successor of Merneferre Ay and a king of the late 13th dynasty of Egypt.
Merikare Pharaoh 21st dynasty fl. c. 21st century BC A pharaoh during the 10th dynasty of Egypt who controlled territories based around Herakleopolis.
Meritamen Princess 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-15th century BC A daughter of Pharaoh Thutmose III and Merytre-Hatshepsut.
Meritamen Queen 19th dynasty fl. c. mid-13th century BC A daughter and later Great Royal Wife of the 19th dynasty pharaoh Ramesses II. Her name is also written as Meritamun, Merytamen, Merytamun, and Meryt-Amen.
Meritaten Princess-Queen 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC Wife of pharaoh Smenkhkare. Meritaten was a daughter of pharaoh Akhenaten and queen Nefertiti. Meritaten also may have ruled as pharaoh in her own right under the name, Ankhkheperure Neferneferuaten.
Meritaten Tasherit Princess 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC She was probably the daughter of Meritaten, the eldest daughter of Pharaoh Akhenaten.
Meritites I Queen 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC Meritites was a daughter of Sneferu. Meritites married her elder half-brother the pharaoh Khufu.
Meritites II Princess 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC Daughter of pharaoh Khufu and his younger half-sister Meritites I. She married Akhethotep, who was a Director of the Palace.
Meritites IV Queen 6th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC She was a wife of king Pepi I.
Merit-Ptah Physician 2nd dynasty fl. c. 28th century BC A female physician who lived during the 2nd dynasty in Egypt.
Merneferre Ay Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. mid-17th century BC An Egyptian king during the 13th dynasty.
Merneith Queen 1st dynasty fl. c. 30th century BC A queen consort and a regent of Egypt during the 1st dynasty. She may have been a ruler of Egypt in her own right. She was king Djet's senior royal wife and the mother of Den.
Merneptah Pharaoh 19th dynasty fl. c. mid to late-13th century BC He was a son of Ramesses II. Merneptah had to carry out several military campaigns during his reign,including against the Libyans, who he defeated with the assistance of the Sea Peoples.
Merenptah Prince 19th dynasty fl. c. mid-13th century BC An Egyptian prince during the 19th dynasty, who was probably the son of the pharaoh Merenptah.
Merti Queen 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-15th century BC A minor foreign-born wife of the 18th dynasty Egyptian pharaoh Thutmose III who was buried in a lavishly furnished rock-cut tomb in Wady Gabbanat el-Qurud.
Meru Official 11th dynasty fl. c. 21st century BC An Egyptian official under king Mentuhotep II during the 11th dynasty. Meru was overseer of sealers at the royal court and therefore one of the highest state officials.
Meryatum High Priest of Re 19th dynasty fl. c. mid-13th century BC An Egyptian prince and High Priest of Re, the son of the 19th dynasty pharaoh Ramesses II and Nefertari.
Meryatum II High Priest of Re 20th dynasty fl. c. mid-12th century BC An Egyptian prince and High Priest of Re. He was a son of the 20th dynasty pharaoh Ramesses III.
Merymose Viceroy of Kush 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC Viceroy of Kush under Amenhotep III. He served for almost the entire four decades of that reign.
Meryptah High Priest of Amun 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC A High Priest of Amun during the reign of the 18th dynasty pharaoh Amenhotep III.
Meryre High Priest of the Aten 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC He was also Hereditary Noble and High Official and Fan-bearer on the Right Side of the King which emphasised his close relationship to the 18th dynasty king Akhenaten.
Meryre II Steward 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC Superintendent to the 18th dynasty Egyptian queen Nefertiti and was also Royal Scribe, Steward and Overseer of the Two Treasuries and of the Royal Harem of Nefertiti.
Merysekhmet Vizier 19th dynasty fl. c. late-13th century BC He served during the reign of the 19th dynasty pharaoh Merenptah.
Meryteti Vizier 6th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC Served as vizier to Pepi I. He was the son of the vizier Mereruka. His mother was princess Sesheshet Watetkhetor.
Merytre-Hatshepsut Queen 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-15th century BC Wife of pharaoh Thutmose III and the mother of Amenhotep II. She was the daughter of a priestess Hui.
Mindjedef Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC He was probably a son of Prince Kawab and Hetepheres II. He was a grandson of Pharaoh Khufu.
Minkhaf I Vizier 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC He was a son of Pharaoh Khufu. His mother may have been Queen Henutsen. He served as vizier during his father's reign.
Minkhaf II Nobleman 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC Great-nephew of Minkhaf I and great-grandson of Khufu.
Minmontu High Priest of Amun 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-16th century BC The High Priest of Amun during the reign of Ahmose I, an 18th dynasty king of Egypt.
Minmose Overseer of the Works 18th dynasty fl. c. late-15th century BC The overseer of works for the 18th dynasty pharaohs Thutmose III and Amenhotep II and took part in expeditions to Syria and Nubia.
Minnefer Supervisor of Palace Attendants, Overseer of Messengers 5th dynasty Known from a statue.
Montuherkhopshef Prince, 20th dynasty fl. c. 12th century BC One of the sons of Ramesses III and Iset Ta-Hemdjert
Mutbenret Princess 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC An Egyptian noblewoman and possibly the sister of the 18th dynasty Great Royal Wife Nefertiti. (or Benretmut)
Mutemwiya Queen 18th dynasty fl. c. early-14th century BC A minor wife of the 18th dynasty Egyptian king Thutmose IV and the mother of Amenhotep III.
Mutnedjmet Queen 18th dynasty fl. c. late-14th century BC Also known as Mutnedjemet, Mutnodjmet, and Mutnodjemet. She was the Great Royal Wife of Horemheb, the last king of the 18th dynasty.
Mutnedjmet Queen 21st dynasty fl. c. late-11th century BC She was the Great Royal Wife of her brother, Psusennes I, and was the mother of Pharaoh Amenemope. She was the daughter of the High Priest of Amun, Pinedjem I.
Mutnofret Queen 18th dynasty fl. c. late-16th century BC A queen of Thutmose I, and the mother of Thutmose II. She was probably a daughter of Ahmose I and a sister of Amenhotep I.

N[edit]

Name Main Title Dynasty Date Comment
Nakht Astronomer 18th dynasty fl. c. 14th century BC Served during the reign of Tuthmose IV. Buried in TT52
Nakhthoreb Pharaoh 30th dynasty See Nectanebo II
Nakhtmin General 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC A general during the reign of Pharaoh Tutankhamun. Nakhtmin may have been the son and heir of Pharaoh Ay but died before the end of the Ay’s reign.
Nakhtnebef Pharaoh 30th dynasty See Nectanebo I
Nakhtneith Queen 1st dynasty fl. c. 31st century BC Wife to king Djer.
Nakhtpaaten (or Nakht) Vizier 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC Vizier of Pharaoh Akhenaten. Nakhtpaaten succeeded the vizier Ramose in office. Known from his tomb in Amarna.
Nakhtubasterau Queen 26th dynasty fl. c. mid-6th century BC Wife of pharaoh Amasis II. Name also written as Nakhtbastetiru.
Naparaye Queen 25th dynasty fl. c. late-8th century BC Naparaye was the daughter of King Piye and the sister-wife of King Taharqa.
Narmer Pharaoh 1st dynasty fl. c. 31st century BC The pharaoh who is thought to be the successor to the proto-dynastic pharaohs Scorpion and/or Ka, and possibly the unifier of Egypt and founder of the 1st dynasty, and therefore the first pharaoh of all Egypt.
Nasakhma King of Kush fl. c. mid-5th century BC Kushite King of Meroe. He was the successor to king Siaspiqa. (or Nasakhmaqa)
Nastasen King of Kush fl. c. late-4th century BC King of Kush (reigned c. 335 BC – c. 310 BC). He was probably the son of King Harsiotef and Queen Pelkha and his wife may have been Sekhmakh. Nastasen defeated an invasion of Kush from Upper Egypt led by a local ruler, Khabbash.
Nauny Princess 21st dynasty fl. c. mid-11th century BC Also known as Nany or Entiuny. She was probably a daughter of High Priest, later Pharaoh Pinedjem I.
Nebamun Vizier 18th- 19th dynasty fl. c. early to mid-13th century BC Vizier during the late 18th and early 19th dynasties of Egypt. He held that office from the reign of Horemheb to the reign of Ramesses II.
Nebemakhet Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC He was the son of pharaoh Khafre and queen Meresankh III. He was Chief Justice and Vizier to the pharaoh Menkaure.
Nebet Queen 5th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC The wife of king Unas.
Nebet Vizier 6th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC A female vizier who held the office during the reign of Pepi I. Nebet’s two daughters, Ankhesenpepi I and Ankhesenpepi II married Pepi I. She was married to Khui and their son Djau was a vizier.
Nebetah Princess 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC Daughter of Amenhotep III and wife Tiye. She was a younger sister of Akhenaten.
Nebetia Princess 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC She was the granddaughter of Pharaoh Thutmose IV and the daughter of Prince Siatum.
Nebetiunet Princess 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-15th century BC A daughter of Pharaoh Thutmose III and his wife Merytre-Hatshepsut.
Nebetnehat Queen 18th dynasty fl. c. 14th century BC A Queen of an unidentified Pharaoh. Her name is only known from an alabaster canopic fragment found in the valley of the Queens.
Nebettawy Princess- Queen 19th dynasty fl. c. mid-13th century BC The daughter and a Great Royal Wife of pharaoh Ramesses II.
Nebiriau I Sewadjenre Pharaoh 16th dynasty fl. c. early-16th century BC Also known as Nebiryerawet I. A pharaoh of the 16th Theban dynasty based in Upper Egypt during the Second Intermediate Period.
Nebiriau II Pharaoh 16th dynasty fl. c. 19th century BC Also known as Nebiryerawet II. A pharaoh of the 16th Theban dynasty based in Upper Egypt during the Second Intermediate Period.
Nebit Vizier 16th dynasty fl. c. early-16th century BC Nebit was an Ancient Egyptian official under king Senusret III.
Nebmaatre Prince, Righ Priest of Re 20th dynasty fl. c. late-12th century BC High Priest of Re in Heliopolis. He was probably a son of Ramesses IX.
Nebneteru Tenry High Priest of Amun 19th dynasty fl. c. early-13th century BC High Priest of Amun under pharaoh Seti I. Nebneteru's wife, Merytre, was Chief of the Harem of Amun.
Nebnuni Pharaoh 13th dynasty See Nebnun(i) Semenkare.
Nebre Pharaoh 2nd dynasty See Raneb.
Nebtu Queen 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-15th century BC Wife of the 18th dynasty king, Thutmose III.
Nebtyemneferes Princess 5th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC Daughter of Pharaoh Djedkare.
Nebty-tepites Princess 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC Nebty-tepites was a daughter of Prince Horbaef and his half-sister Meresankh II. After Horbaef's death, Meresankh married either the pharaoh Djedefra or the pharaoh Khafra.
Nebwenenef High Priest of Amun 19th dynasty fl. c. early-13th century BC High Priest of Amun at the beginning of the reign of Ramesses II. Prior to that, Nebwenenef had served as High Priest of Anhur and High Priest of Hathor during the reign of Seti I.
Neby Pharaoh 7th dynasty See Neferkare Neby.
Necho I King of Sais 26th dynasty fl. c. mid-7th century BC Also known as Nekau I. Governor of the Egyptian city of Sais. He was the first attested local Saite king of the 26th dynasty of Egypt (reigned c. 672 BC–c. 664 BC). He was killed by an invading Kushite force under Tantamani.
Necho II Pharaoh 26th dynasty fl. c. late-7th century BC Also known as Nekau II (reigned c. 610 BC–c. 595 BC). Following the collapse of the Assyrian Empire, the Babylonians under Nebuchadrezzar II fought the armies of Pharaoh Necho II. The Egyptians were defeated and eventually expelled from Syria.
Nectanebo I Pharaoh 30th dynasty reigned 380 BC – 362 BC Also known as Nekhtnebef. Nectanebo deposed and killed Nefaarud II, starting the last dynasty of Egyptian kings. He spent much of his reign defending his kingdom against Persian reconquest but still erected many monuments and temples.
Nectanebo II Pharaoh 30th dynasty reigned 360 BC – 343 BC Also known as Nakhthoreb, the last king of the 30th dynasty and the last native Egyptian ruler in antiquity. He was placed on the throne by the Spartan king Agesilaus II, who helped him overthrow Teos and fight off a rival pretender. Nectanebo II was defeated by the Persian king Artaxerxes III, and went into exile in Nubia. Egypt once again became a satrapy of the Persian Empire.
Nedjeftet Queen 6th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC Wife of pharaoh Pepi I.
Nedjem Prince 18th dynasty fl. c. late-15th century BC He was a son of Pharaoh Amenhotep II.
Nedjemib Princess 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC She was a daughter of Rahotep and Nofret and niece of pharaoh Khufu.
Neferefre Pharaoh 5th dynasty fl. c. 25th century BC Also known as Raneferef. He reigned c. 2460 BC – c. 2453 BC.
Neferetnebty Queen 5th dynasty fl. c. 25th century BC A wife of pharaoh Sahure. Her name is sometimes written as Neferet-ha-Nebti, or Neferetnebti.
Neferhetepes Princess 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A daughter of Pharaoh Djedefre.
Neferhotep Scribe 13th dynasty fl. c. mid-18th century BC A 13th dynasty Egyptian official and scribe.
Neferhotep I Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. late-18th century BC He was the son of a Theban military family and brother of King Sobekhotep IV.
Neferhotep III Sekhemre Sankhtawy Pharaoh 16th dynasty fl. c. late-17th century BC A king during the Theban 16th Dynasty.
Neferirkare Pharaoh 8th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC He reigned c. 2161 BC – c. 2160 BC, during the First Intermediate Period.
Neferirkare Kakai Pharaoh 5th dynasty fl. c. 25th century BC He reigned c. 2477 BC – c. 2467 BC. He married Queen Khentkaus II.
Neferkahor Pharaoh 7th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC May have been a 7th dynasty king of Egypt during the First Intermediate Period.
Neferkamin Pharaoh 7th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC May have been a 7th dynasty king of Egypt during the First Intermediate Period.
Neferkamin Anu Pharaoh 8th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC May have been an 8th dynasty king of Egypt during the First Intermediate Period.
Neferkara I Pharaoh 8th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC May have been a 7th dynasty king of Egypt during the First Intermediate Period.
Neferkare II Pharaoh 7th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC May have been a 7th dynasty king of Egypt during the First Intermediate Period.
Neferkare III Pharaoh 9th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC A king during the 9th dynasty of Egypt controlling territories based around Herakleopolis.
Neferkare Iymeru Vizier 13th dynasty An Egyptian vizier under king Sobekhotep IV.
Neferkare Khendu Pharaoh 7th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC May have been a 7th dynasty king of Egypt during the First Intermediate Period.
Neferkare Neby Pharaoh 7th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC May have been a 7th dynasty king of Egypt during the First Intermediate Period. His mother was probably Queen Ankhesenpepi II and his father was probably Pepi II Neferkare.
Neferkare Pepiseneb Pharaoh 8th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC May have been an 8th dynasty king of Egypt during the First Intermediate Period.
Neferkare Tereru Pharaoh 7th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC May have been a 7th dynasty king of Egypt during the First Intermediate Period.
Neferkau Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC He was a son of Rahotep and Nofret and nephew of pharaoh Khufu.
Neferkauhor Pharaoh 8th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC He reigned c. 2163 BC–c. 2161 BC, during the First Intermediate Period.
Neferkaure II Pharaoh 8th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC He reigned c. 2167 BC–c. 2163 BC, during the First Intermediate Period.
Nefermaat I Vizier 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A son of pharaoh Sneferu. He was a vizier and was a half-brother of Khufu. Nefermaat's wife was Itet.
Nefermaat II Vizier 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC Vizier during the reign of his cousin pharaoh Khafra. Nefermaat was a son of Princess Nefertkau .
Neferneferuaten Ankhkheperure Pharaoh 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC A female Egyptian pharaoh (reigned c.1335 BC – c.1333 BC) toward the end of the Amarna era during the 18th Dynasty. She was probably a daughter of pharaoh Akhenaten.
Neferneferuaten Tasherit Princess 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC A daughter of Pharaoh Akhenaten and his Great Royal Wife Nefertiti.
Neferneferure Princess 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC A daughter of Pharaoh Akhenaten and Great Royal Wife Nefertiti.
Neferronpet Vizier 19th dynasty fl. c. mid-13th century BC An Egyptian vizier and a High Priest of Ptah during the reign of pharaoh Ramesses II.
Nefersheshemre called Seshi Vizier 6th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC A vizier during the early to middle part of the reign of the 6th dynasty Egyptian pharaoh Teti.
Nefertari Queen 18th dynasty fl. c. late-15th century BC The first Great Royal Wife of Pharaoh Thutmose IV.
Nefertari Queen 19th dynasty fl. c. mid-13th century BC Also known as Nefertari Merytmut, one of the Great Royal Wives of pharaoh Ramesses II.
Neferthenut Queen 12th dynasty fl. c. mid-19th century BC She was probably the wife of pharaoh Senusret III.
Nefertiabet Princess 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC She was a daughter of Pharaoh Khufu and sister of Hetepheres II and Khafra.
Nefertiti Queen 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC The Great Royal Wife of Pharaoh Akhenaten. Nefertiti is also known for her bust which was attributed to the sculptor Thutmose.
Nefertkau I Princess 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A daughter of pharaoh Sneferu and a half-sister to Khufu.
Nefertkau II Princess 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC The wife and sister of Prince Khufukhaf I, son of the 4th dynasty pharaoh Khufu.
Nefertkau III Princess 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC She was probably a daughter of Meresankh II and Prince Horbaef. She was married to an official named Iynefer.
Nefertnesu Princess 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC She was a daughter of pharaoh Sneferu and she was a half-sister to pharaoh Khufu.
Neferu III Queen 12th dynasty fl. c. mid-20th century BC She was a daughter of Amenemhat I, wife of her brother, Senusret I, and the mother of Amenemhat II.
Neferuptah Princess 12th dynasty fl. c. late-19th century BC Also known as Ptahneferu, a daughter of the Egyptian king Amenemhat III of the 12th dynasty. Her sister was the Pharaoh Sobekneferu.
Neferure Princess 18th dynasty fl. c. early-15th century BC The daughter of two pharaohs, Hatshepsut and Thutmose II. She served in high offices in the Egyptian government and the religious administration.
Nefrubity Princess 18th dynasty fl. c. early-15th century BC She is sometimes called Akhbetneferu. She was the daughter of Pharaoh Thutmose I and Ahmose, the sister of Hatshepsut and the half-sister of Thutmose II.
Nehesy Pharaoh 14th dynasty fl. c. late-18th century BC A ruler during the 14th dynasty of Egypt of the Second Intermediate Period.
Nehi Viceroy of Kush 18th dynasty Nehy was in office under Thutmose III.
Neith Queen 6th dynasty fl. c. 23rd century BC One of the queens of the 6th dynasty pharaoh Pepi II. Neith was probably a daughter of the pharaoh Pepi I and queen Ankhesenpepi I, making her half-sister to pharaoh Pepi II. Neith may be the mother of pharaoh Nemtyemsaf II.
Neithhotep Queen 1st dynasty fl. c. 31st century BC Queen of Egypt, and likely wife of Narmer.
Neitiqerty Siptah Pharaoh 6th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC He reigned c. 2183 BC – c. 2181 BC, and was an obscure successor to Merenre Nemtyemsaf II towards the end of the 6th dynasty of Egypt.
Nekauba Pharaoh 26th dynasty fl. c. mid-7th century BC He reigned c. 678 BC – c. 672 BC during the 26th Saite dynasty of Egypt.
Nemtyemsaf I Pharaoh 6th dynasty see Merenre Nemtyemsaf I
Nemtyemsaf II Pharaoh 6th dynasty see Merenre Nemtyemsaf II
Nepherites I Pharaoh 29th dynasty reigned 399 BC – 393 BC Also known as Nefaarud I. He founded the 29th dynasty of Egypt by defeating and then executing Amyrtaeus. Nepherites was a native of Mendes, which he made his capital. He supported Sparta in its war against the Persians by supplying them with grain and ship building material.
Nepherites II Pharaoh 29th dynasty reigned 380 BC Also known as Nefaarud II, a pharaoh of Egypt. Following the death of his father Hakor, he was the last pharaoh of the 29th dynasty. He was deposed and killed by Nectanebo I after ruling Egypt for only 4 months.
Neserkauhor Prince 5th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC He was a son of Djedkare Isesi.
Nesitanebetashru Noble Woman 21st dynasty fl. c. early-10th century BC A daughter of the Egyptian nobleman and High Priest of Amun, Pinedjem II, and his wife Neskhons.
Nesitanebetashru Queen 22nd dynasty fl. c. mid-9th century BC The wife of Sheshonk II and the mother of Pharaoh Harsiese. She was also a Chantress of Amun.
Nesitaudjatakhet Queen 22nd dynasty fl. c. 9th century BC Nesitaudjatakhet was a wife of Pharaoh Sheshonk II and the mother of Prince Osorkon D.
Neskhons Princess 21st dynasty fl. c. late-11th century BC She was the daughter of Smendes II and Takhentdjehuti, and wed her paternal uncle, High Priest Pinedjem II.
Neterkheperre Meryptah called Pipi II High Priest of Ptah 21st dynasty fl. c. early-10th century BC He was High Priest of Ptah during the reigns of the pharaohs Psusennes I, Amenemope, Osochor and Siamun.
Netjeraperef Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A son of the Egyptian pharaoh Sneferu. He was a half-brother of Khufu and nephew to Hetepheres I.
Netjerkare Pharaoh 7th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC May have been a 7th dynasty king of Egypt during the First Intermediate Period.
Nikare Pharaoh 7th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC May have been a 7th dynasty king of Egypt during the First Intermediate Period.
Nikaure Vizier 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A prince, chief justice and vizier during the 4th dynasty. Nikaure was a son of Pharaoh Khafre and Queen Persenet. His wife was Nikanebti.
Nimaethap Queen 2nd dynasty fl. c. 27th century BC A queen of Egypt at the end of the 2nd dynasty. Wife of Pharaoh Khasekhemwy.
Nimlot High Priest of Amun 22nd dynasty fl. c. mid-9th century BC A High Priest of Amun at Thebes during the latter part of the reign of his father, pharaoh Osorkon II.
Nitocris Pharaoh / Queen 6th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC May have been the last pharaoh of the Egyptian 6th Dynasty. However, her historicity has been questioned.
Nitocris I God's Wife of Amun 26th dynasty fl. c. mid-7th to early-6th century BC Also known as Nitiqret, she was the Divine Adoratrice of Amun or God's Wife of Amun for over 70 years. She was the daughter of the Saite pharaoh Psamtik I.
Nofret Princess 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A noblewoman and princess who lived during the 4th dynasty of Egypt. Nofret married Prince Rahotep, who was a son of Pharaoh Sneferu.
Nofret II Queen 12th dynasty fl. c. early-19th century BC She was a daughter of Amenemhat II and wife of Senusret II.
Nubhetepti-khered Princess 13th dynasty fl. c. mid-18th century BC An Egyptian king's daughter during the 13th dynasty. Probably a daughter of King Hor.
Nubkhaes Queen 13th dynasty fl. c. mid-17th century BC A 13th dynasty Egyptian queen whose husband is assumed to be one of the successors of pharaoh Sobekhotep IV.
Nubkhesbed Queen 20th dynasty fl. c. mid-12th century BC She was the Great Royal Wife of Pharaoh Ramesses VI and mother of Pharaoh Ramesses VII.
Nubwenet Queen 6th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC Also known as Nebuunet, an Egyptian queen consort and a wife of the 6th dynasty pharaoh Pepi I.
Nykara Granary Official 5th dynasty fl. c. 25th century BC Known from a granite statue of Nykara and his family, now at the Brooklyn Museum.
Nynetjer Pharaoh 2nd dynasty fl. c. 28th century BC A king during the 2nd dynasty of Egypt. It is possible that he was a son of Raneb.
Nyuserre Ini Pharaoh 5th dynasty fl. c. 25th century BC Also known as Neuserre Izi, Niuserre Isi, Nyuserra, and Rathoris. A 5th dynasty pharaoh of Egypt (reigned c. 2453 BC – c. 2422 BC).

O[edit]

Name Main Title Dynasty Date Comment
Osorkon the Elder Pharaoh 21st dynasty fl. c. early-10th century BC Osorkon Akheperre Setepenre reigned c. 992 BC – c. 986 BC, and was the first pharaoh of Libyan extraction to rule Egypt. He was the son of Shoshenq, the Great Chief of the Ma.
Osorkon I Pharaoh 22nd dynasty reigned c. 922 BC – c. 887 BC He was the son of Sheshonk I and his chief consort, Karomat. Osorkon I's reign was long and prosperous and is known for many temple building projects.
Osorkon II Pharaoh 22nd dynasty reigned c. 872 BC – c. 837 BC The son of Takelot I and Queen Kapes. He ruled Egypt from Tanis. After succeeding his father, he faced a revolt from his cousin, Harsiese, who controlled Thebes. However, Osorkon II was able to unite Egypt after Harsiese's death. Further names include 'Usermaatre Setepenamun.
Osorkon III Pharaoh 23rd dynasty reigned c. 798 BC – c. 769 BC Usermaatre Setepenamun Si-Ese was a pharaoh of Upper Egypt based in Thebes. He was also a High Priest of Amun. He was a son of Takelot II and Queen Karomama II. During his reign, he defeated the rival forces of Sheshonk IV.
Osorkon IV Pharaoh 22nd dynasty fl. c. mid-8th century BC A ruler of Lower Egypt who was based in Tanis and therefore one of the 22nd dynasty pharaoh Shoshenq V's successors.

P[edit]

Name Main Title Dynasty Date Comment
Paanchi Pharaoh 25th dynasty see Piye
Pabasa Chief Steward 26th dynasty fl. c. mid-7th century BC Chief Steward to the Divine Adoratrice of Amun, Nitocris I.
Pageti Princess 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A daughter of Nefermaat, the eldest son of pharaoh Sneferu and Itet.
Pahemnetjer High Priest of Ptah 19th dynasty fl. c. mid-13th century BC A High Priest of Ptah during the reign of Ramesses II. Pahemnetjer succeeded Huy as High Priest of Ptah.
Pami Usermaatre Setepenre Pharaoh 22nd dynasty fl. c. mid-8th century BC He reigned c. 785 BC – c. 778 BC, and was a member of the Meshwesh Libyans then ruling the country.
Panehesy (I) Chief servitor of the Aten 18th dynasty fl. c. 14th century BC High Priest of the Aten in the temple of Aten in Akhetaten during the reign of Akhenaten.
Panehesy (II) Prophet of Amenhotep (I) of the Forecourt 19th dynasty fl. c. 13th century BC He served during the reign of Pharaoh Ramesses II.
Panehesy Vizier 19th dynasty fl. c. late-13th century BC He served during the reign of Pharaoh Merenptah.
Paraemheb Vizier 19th dynasty fl. c. late-13th century BC A vizier of Egypt during the reigns of the pharaohs Amenmesse and Seti II. Also known as Pre'em'hab.
Pareherwenemef Prince 19th dynasty fl. c. mid-13th century BC He was a son of pharaoh Ramesses II and Queen Nefertari.
Pareherwenemef Prince 20th dynasty fl. c. early-12th century BC A son of pharaoh Ramesses III.
Parennefer called Wennefer High Priest of Amun 18th dynasty fl. c. mid to late-14th century BC High Priest of Amun during the reigns of the 18th dynasty pharaohs Tutankhamen and Horemheb.
Parennefer Royal Butler 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC Pharaoh Akhenaten's close adviser both before and after Akhenaten came to the throne.
Paser I Viceroy of Kush 18th dynasty fl. c. 14th century BC Paser I likely served during the reigns of Ay and Horemheb
Paser Vizier 19th dynasty fl. c. early to mid-13th century BC Vizier during the reigns of pharaohs Seti I and Ramesses II. Later he became a High Priest of Amun.
Paser II Viceroy of Kush 19th dynasty fl. c. 13th century BC Paser II was the son of the High Priest of Min and Isis named Minmose. He was a King's son of Kush, overseer of the Southern Lands, and king's scribe.
Pashedu Artisan 19th dynasty fl. c. 13th century BC Lived in Deir el-Medina on the west bank of the Nile, opposite Thebes, during the reign of Seti I.
Patareshnes Queen 22nd dynasty fl. c. mid-10th century BC Wife of pharaoh Sheshonk I. Her name is sometimes written as Patoreshnes or Penreshnes.
Paweraa Mayor of Western Thebes 20th dynasty fl. c. 11th century BC Mayor of Western Thebes during a series of tomb robberies that occurred in the Valley of the Kings during the late New Kingdom.
Pawura Chief of the Archers 18th dynasty fl. c. 14th century BC An Egyptian official mentioned in the Amarna letters. He is referred to as an Egyptian "archer–commander" and an "irpi–official".
Pebatjma Nubian Queen fl. c. 8th century BC Wife of King Kashta and mother of King Piye (possibly), King Shabaka, God's Wife Amenirdis I, Queens Khensa and Peksater.
Pebekkamen Chief of the Chamber 20th dynasty fl. c. early-12th century BC One of the key conspirators in the Harem conspiracy, a plot to overthrow Pharaoh Ramesses III. Pebekkamen had served as chief of the chamber to Ramesses. Following his trial, Pebekkamen was executed.
Pediamenopet Priest 25th and 26th dynasty fl. c. late 8th century BC A librarian, archivist and Chief Lector Priest during the Egyptian 25th and 26th dynasties who amassed enough wealth to build a labyrinthine tomb covered with frescoes and hieroglyphics.
Pediese Local Ruler Third Intermediate Period fl. c. late 8th century BC Pediese, married to the great-great-granddaughter of Shoshenq III, was one of a number of princes ruling Lower Egypt. He was of Libyan descent, a chief of the Ma. He ruled from Athribis.
Pediese, chief of the Ma High Priest of Ptah Third Intermediate Period fl. c. late 8th century BC Involved in the replacement of an Apis bull which had died in the 28th year of the reign of Shoshenq III.
Petiese Administrator Persian Occupation, 26th dynasty fl. c. 7th century BC Petiese I, son of Ireturu, administered Upper Egypt. In 651 BCE he had his priestly offices confirmed by Psamtik I.
Pedubast I Pharaoh 23rd dynasty fl. c. late-9th century BC A king of Libyan ancestry (reigned c. 829 BC – c. 804 BC) . He was the main opponent to the 23rd dynasty Upper Egyptian pharaohs Takelot II and Osorkon III during a protracted civil war between these two competing sides.
Pedubast II Pharaoh 22nd dynasty fl. c. mid-8th century BC A pharaoh of Lower Egypt (reigned c. 740 BC – c. 730 BC) associated with the 22nd dynasty. He was a possible son and successor to Shoshenq V.
Peksater Queen 25th dynasty fl. c. mid-8th century BC She was a daughter of King Kashta and Queen Pebatjma and a wife of the pharaoh, Piye.
Penebui Queen 1st dynasty fl. c. 31st century BC Wife of King Djer.
Pennesuttawy General 19th dynasty fl. c. late-14th century BC A general and superintendent of the Southern Lands (Kush) at the beginning of the 19th dynasty of Egypt. Pennesuttawy was a brother of the High Priest of Amun, Parennefer.
Pensekhmet Vizier 19th dynasty fl. c. late-13th century BC He served during the reign of the 19th dynasty pharaoh Merenptah.
Pentawer(et) Prince 19th dynasty fl. c. early-12th century BC A son of Pharaoh Ramesses III and Queen Tiye. He was to be the beneficiary of a "harem conspiracy" planned by his mother to assassinate the pharaoh. The plot failed and Pentawer was forced to commit suicide.
Penthu Physician, Chamberlain 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC The seal-bearer of the king, king's scribe, chief of physicians and chamberlain to the 18th dynasty pharaoh Akhenaten.
Pentu Vizier 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC Vizier of Egypt during the reign of pharaoh Tutankhamun. Also written as Pentju.
Pepi I Meryre Pharaoh 6th dynasty reigned c. 2332 BC – c. 2283 BC Pepi I's long reign was marked by an aggressive expansion into Nubia and the spread of trade to far-flung areas such as Lebanon and the Somalian coast, but also the growing power of the nomarchs.
Pepi II Neferkare Pharaoh 6th dynasty reigned c. 2278 BC – c. 2184 BC He was the son of Merenre and Ankhesenpepi II. His lengthy reign was marked by a sharp decline of the Old Kingdom as the power of the nomarchs grew.
Pepi III Pharaoh 16th dynasty The seventh pharaoh of the Hyksos Sixteenth dynasty of Egypt.
Perneb Prince 2nd dynasty fl. c. 28th century BC He was a son of the 2nd dynasty pharaoh Hotepsekhemwy.
Persenet Queen 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC She may have been a daughter of King Khufu and a wife of King Khafra.
Peseshet (Female) physician 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC Her title was "lady overseer of the female physicians,"but whether she was a physician herself is uncertain. She had a son, Akhethetep, in whose mastaba at Giza her personal stela was found.
Petubastis III Pharaoh Persian Occupation fl. late 6th century BC An Egyptian ruler who revolted against Persian rule under the satrap Aryandes. He was probably a member of the old royal Saitic line, who attempted to seize power around 522 BC. Aryandes probably quelled the rebellion.(or Seheruibre Padibastet)
Piankh High Priest of Amun 21st dynasty fl. c. mid-11th century BC High Priest of Amun who led an army against Pinehesy, viceroy of Kush, who had conquered large parts of Upper Egypt and succeeded in driving him back into Nubia.
Pihuri Commissioner 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC An Egyptian commissioner in the "Land of Retenu" (Canaan) mentioned in the Amarna letters. He probably served under pharaohs Amenhotep III and Akhenaten. His name is sometimes written as Pakhura.
Pimay Prince 22nd dynasty fl. c. late-9th century BC Son of king Sheshonk III. He served as a 'Great Chief of the Ma' during his father's reign.
Pinedjem I High Priest of Amun 21st dynasty fl. c. mid-11th century BC High Priest of Amun at Thebes in Egypt and the de facto ruler of Middle and Upper Egypt from 1054 BC. He asserted his virtual independence from the 21st dynasty based at Tanis. He married Duathathor-Henuttawy, a daughter of Ramesses XI.
Pinedjem II High Priest of Amun 21st dynasty fl. c. early-10th century BC High Priest of Amun at Thebes in Egypt and the de facto ruler of the south of the country. He married his sister Isetemkheb and his niece Nesikhons, the daughter of his brother Smendes II.
Pinehesy Viceroy of Kush 20th dynasty fl. c. early-11th century BC Served during the reign of pharaoh Ramesses XI. Pinehesy extended his influence over much of the south of Egypt defying Ramesses XI. However, the High Priest of Amun, Herihor, was able to drive Pinehesy back into Nubia. Also known as Panehesy or Panehasy.
Pipi High Priest of Ptah 21st dynasty fl. c. mid-11th century BC High Priest of Ptah, a contemporary of Pharaoh Psusennes I. He was the father of the High Priest of Ptah Harsiese.
Piye (or Piankhi the Nubian) Pharaoh 25th dynasty reigned c. 752 BC – c. 721 BC A Kushite king and founder of the 25th dynasty of Egypt who ruled from the city of Napata. As ruler of Nubia and Upper Egypt, Piye took advantage of the squabbling of Egypt's rulers to expand Nubia's power beyond Thebes into Lower Egypt receiving the submission of the kings of the Nile Delta.
Pothinus Regent Ptolemaic fl. mid-1st century BC An official under Pharaoh Ptolemy XII. When Ptolemy XII died in 51 BC, as his son Ptolemy XIII was under age, Pothinus was appointed as his regent. Pothinus used his influence to turn Ptolemy XIII against Cleopatra VII. In the resultant civil war, Cleopatra VII and Julius Caesar prevailed and Pothinus was executed in 47 BC.
Prehotep I Vizier 19th dynasty fl. c. mid-13th century BC Vizier during the latter part of the reign of pharaoh Ramesses II. Also known as Rahotep, Parahotep, Parehotp.
Prehotep II Vizier 19th dynasty fl. c. mid-13th century BC Vizier during the latter part of the reign of pharaoh Ramesses II. Parahotep was the son of the High Priest of Ptah Pahemnetjer. Also known as Rahotep, Parahotep, Parehotp.
Psammuthes Pharaoh 29th dynasty fl. c. early-4th century BC Upon the death of Nepherites I, two rival factions fought for the throne: one supported Muthis son of Nefaarud, and the other supported an usurper named Psammuthes. Both men were eventually defeated by a general named Hakor.
Psamtik I Wahibre Pharaoh 26th dynasty reigned c. 664 BC – c. 610 BC Psamtik managed to unite all of Egypt and free the country from Assyrian and Nubian control within the first ten years of his reign. (or Psammeticus or Psammetichus)
Psamtik II Pharaoh 26th dynasty reigned c. 595 BC – c. 589 BC In 592 BC, Psamtik II marched deep into Nubia and inflicted a heavy defeat on the kingdom of Kush.(or Psammetichus or Psammeticus)
Psamtik III Pharaoh 26th dynasty reigned c. 526 BC – c. 525 BC The last pharaoh of the 26th dynasty of Egypt. Psamtik had ruled Egypt for only six months before the Persian invasion led by King Cambyses II. Psamtik was defeated at Pelusium and later executed by the Persians.(or Psammetichus or Psammeticus)
Psusennes I Pharaoh 21st dynasty reigned c. 1047 BC – c. 1001 BC He was the son of Pinedjem I and Henuttawy, a daughter of Ramesses XI. He married his sister Mutnedjmet.(or Psibkhanno or Hor-Pasebakhaenniut I)
Psusennes II Titkheperure Pharaoh 21st dynasty reigned c. 967 BC – c. 943 BC The last king of the 21st dynasty of Egypt. He was a High Priest of Amun at Thebes and the son of Pinedjem II and Istemkheb.(or Tyetkheperre Psusennes II or Hor-Pasebakhaenniut II)
Psusennes III High Priest of Amun 21st dynasty fl. c. mid-10th century BC A High Priest of Amun at Thebes towards the end of the 21st Dynasty of Egypt.
Ptahhotep Vizier 5th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC He was the city administrator and vizier during the reign of Djedkare Isesi. He is credited with authoring "The Instruction of Ptahhotep", which was meant to instruct young men in appropriate behaviour.
Ptahmose High Priest of Ptah 18th dynasty fl. c. late-15th century BC He served under pharaohs Thutmose IV and Amenhotep III. Ptahmose also held the titles of count and governor, and Sem-priest.
Ptahmose Vizier 18th dynasty fl. c. early-14th century BC High Priest of Amun and vizier of southern Egypt under the 18th dynasty pharaoh Amenhotep III.
Ptahshepses Vizier 5th dynasty fl. c. 25th century BC The vizier and son-in-law of king Niuserre. His mastaba complex in Abusir is considered by many to be the most extensive and architecturally unique non-royal tomb of the Old Kingdom.
Ptolemy Apion Prince Ptolemaic c. 150 BC – 96 BC The last Greek Cyrenaean King (reigned 116 BC – 96 BC) and was a member of the Ptolemaic dynasty. He was a son of Pharaoh Ptolemy VIII Physcon of Egypt. When Ptolemy VIII died, Ptolemy Apion inherited Cyrenaica and became its king.
Ptolemy Eupator Prince Ptolemaic c. 165 BC – c. 152 BC The son of Ptolemy VI Philometor and Cleopatra II and, for a short time before his death, reigned as co-ruler with his father.
Ptolemy Keraunos Prince Ptolemaic c. 325 BC – 279 BC King of Macedon (reigned 281 BC – 279 BC). He was the eldest son of Ptolemy I Soter and Eurydice. Keraunos was killed during a battle against the Gauls of Bolgius.
Ptolemy of Mauretania (or Ptolemaeus) Prince Ptolemaic 1 BC – 40 AD The last king of Mauretania (reigned 23 AD-40 AD). Ptolemy was the son of King Juba II and Queen Cleopatra Selene II. With the support of Roman forces, Ptolemy was able to end Berber revolts by 24 AD. In 40 AD, Caligula invited Ptolemy to Rome where he was killed on Caligula's orders.
Ptolemy Philadelphus Prince Ptolemaic 36 BC – c. 29 BC Son of Cleopatra VII and Mark Antony. In 34 BC, at the Donations of Alexandria, Ptolemy was made ruler of Syria, Phoenicia and Cilicia. Octavian took Ptolemy and his siblings to Rome to be paraded in his military triumph.
Ptolemy I Soter I (Ptolemy the Savior) Pharaoh Ptolemaic c. 367 BC–c. 283 BC A Macedonian general under Alexander the Great, who became ruler of Egypt (reigned 323 BC–283 BC). In 305 BC he took the title of pharaoh. When Alexander died in 323 BC Ptolemy was appointed satrap of Egypt and in the wars that followed was able to securely hold Egypt.
Ptolemy II Philadelphus Pharaoh Ptolemaic 309 BC–246 BC He reigned 283 BC – 246 BC. He was the son of Ptolemy I Soter and Berenice. Ptolemy expanded the library in Alexandria and patronized scientific research. Although an enthusiast for Hellenic culture, he also adopted Egyptian religious concepts. Ptolemy's first marriage was to Arsinoë I, daughter of Lysimachus, and later he married his sister Arsinoë II.
Ptolemy III Euergetes Pharaoh Ptolemaic reigned 246 BC–222 BC He married Berenice of Cyrene. Following Ptolemy's eldest sister Berenice Phernophorus’ murder by the Seleucid rulers in Syria, Ptolemy III invaded Syria. His forces occupied Antioch and even reached Babylon. In exchange for peace in 241 BC, Ptolemy was awarded territories on the northern coast of Syria. Under his rule, the Ptolemaic kingdom reached the height of its power.
Ptolemy IV Philopator Pharaoh Ptolemaic reigned 221 BC–205 BC He was a son of Ptolemy III and Berenice II. During his reign, the decline of the Ptolemaic kingdom began. Ptolemy IV responded effectively to the attacks of Antiochus III on Coele-Syria and Judea and his victory at Raphia (217 BC) secured the northern borders of the kingdom for the remainder of his reign. The native population of Upper Egypt revolted, creating a separate state for twenty years.
Ptolemy V Epiphanes Pharaoh Ptolemaic 209 BC – 181 BC A son of Ptolemy IV and Arsinoe III and a king of the Ptolemaic dynasty (reigned 204 BC–181 BC). Ptolemy IV's favourites, Agathocles and Sosibius, became Ptolemy V's regents. In 202 BC, a general, Tlepolemus, revolted and killed the two regents. During his reign lands in Caria, Thrace, Coele-Syria, including Judea, were lost. However, Upper Egypt was brought back under Ptolemaic control.
Ptolemy VI Philometor Pharaoh Ptolemaic 186 BC–145 BC In 170 BC, Antiochus IV invaded Egypt twice retaining Ptolemy VI as a puppet king. In 164 BC, he was driven off the throne by Ptolemy VIII, but was quickly restored by the Alexandrians after which he ruled uneasily, cruelly suppressing frequent rebellions and facing a growing Roman interference. Ptolemy VI was killed in the Battle of Antioch.
Ptolemy VII Neos Philopator Pharaoh Ptolemaic fl. c. mid-2nd century BC He was possibly the son of Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra II and reigned briefly with his father in 145 BC, and for a short time after that, but was murdered by his uncle, Ptolemy VIII, who succeeded him.
Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II Physcon Pharaoh Ptolemaic c. 182 BC–116 BC He reigned 170 BC – 163 BC, 145 BC – 131 BC, and 127 BC – 116 BC. In 170 BC Antiochus IV invaded Egypt and captured Ptolemy VI and let him rule as a puppet monarch. But the Alexandrians chose Ptolemy VIII as king. While Ptolemy VI went to Rome to gain support, Ptolemy VIII's ruled, but was unpopular. So in 163 BC, Ptolemy VI returned to rule Egypt while Ptolemy VIII ruled Cyrenaica. When Ptolemy VI died, Ptolemy VIII took the throne. In 131 BC, the people of Alexandria rioted and Ptolemy VIII escaped to Cyprus until he regained power in 127 BC.
Ptolemy IX Soter II Lathyros Pharaoh Ptolemaic c.142 BC – 81 BC He reigned 116 BC – 110 BC, 109 BC – 107 BC and 88 BC – 81 BC, with intervening periods ruled by his brother, Ptolemy X Alexander as their mother Cleopatra III played both brothers off against each other.
Ptolemy X Alexander Pharaoh Ptolemaic c.140 BC – 88 BC He reigned 110 BC – 109 BC and 107 BC – 88 BC with intervening periods ruled by his brother, Ptolemy IX as their mother Cleopatra III played both brothers off against each other.
Ptolemy XI Alexander II Pharaoh Ptolemaic fl. c. early-1st century BC He ruled Egypt for a few days in 80 BC. Ptolemy XI was a son of Ptolemy X Alexander and either Cleopatra Selene or Berenice III.
Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos Theos Philopator Theos Philadelphos Pharaoh Ptolemaic 117 BC–51 BC During his reign, Egypt lost Cyprus and Cyrenaica. Ptolemy XII attempted to secure his position through a pro-Roman policy, but the Egyptians rebelled against his high taxes. Ptolemy XII then fled to Rome and his daughter Berenice IV became queen of Egypt. Ptolemy XII was able to recover his throne in 55 BC with the support of Roman soldiers and mercenaries.
Ptolemy XIII Theos Philopator Pharaoh Ptolemaic c. 62 BC–47 BC He was a son of Ptolemy XII and succeeded his father in 51 BC as co-ruler with his wife and older sister Cleopatra VII. In 48 BC, Ptolemy XIII attempted to depose Cleopatra VII leading civil war in Egypt. Julius Caesar intervened, enabling Cleopatra VII to regain Egyptian throne and forcing Ptolemy XIII to flee the city. Ptolemy XIII drowned while attempting to cross the Nile.
Ptolemy XIV Pharaoh Ptolemaic c. 60 BC–44 BC He was a son of Ptolemy XII. Following the death of his older brother Ptolemy XIII, Ptolemy XIV ruled with his older sister, Cleopatra VII. Cleopatra also married her new co-ruler but continued as Julius Caesar's lover. When Caesar was murdered in Rome, Cleopatra poisoned Ptolemy XIV and replaced him with Ptolemy XV Caesarion, her son by Caesar.
Ptolemy XV Philopator Philometor Caesar Pharaoh Ptolemaic see Caesarion
Puimre Second prophet of Amun 18th dynasty fl. c. early-14th century BC Served during the reigns of Thutmose III and Hatshepsut.
Pyhia Princess 18th dynasty fl. c. early-14th century BC An Egyptian princess, a daughter of Thutmose IV. Her name is sometimes written as Pyihia or Petepihu.

Q[edit]

Name Main Title Dynasty Date Comment
Qa'a Pharaoh 1st dynasty fl. c. 29th century BC The last king of the 1st dynasty of Egypt.
Qakare Ibi Pharaoh 8th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC He reigned c. 2169 BC – c. 2167 BC, during the First Intermediate Period.
Qalhata Queen 25th dynasty fl. c. late-8th century BC Qalhata was a daughter of King Piye and a queen consort to her brother Shabaka.
Qar Pharaoh 16th dynasty The sixth pharaoh of the Hyksos Sixteenth dynasty of Egypt
Qen Artisan 19th dynasty fl. c. 13th century BC Qen lived in Deir el-Medina during the reign of Ramesses II. His titles included Servant in the Place of Truth, meaning that he work on the excavation and decoration of nearby royal tombs.
Qenna Merchant Known from the Papyrus of Qenna, a part of the Book of the Dead.

R[edit]

Name Main Title Dynasty Date Comment
Raemka Prince 5th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC Possibly a son of Pharaoh Menkauhor Kaiu. Raemka was buried in Saqqara.
Raherka Chief of Scribes 4th - 5th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC Raherka was an official known mainly from the pair statue with his wife: The statue of Raherka and Meresankh
Rahotep Pharaoh 17th dynasty fl. c. early-16th century BC Also known as Sekhenrewahkhaw Rahotep. He reigned during the Second Intermediate Period, when Egypt was ruled by a number of kings at the same time.
Rahotep Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC He was probably a son of pharaoh Sneferu and his first wife, although his father could have been Huni. Statues of Rahotep and his wife Nofret were found in his mastaba in Meidum.
Ramesses I Menpehtyre Pharaoh 19th dynasty fl. c. late-14th to early 13th century BC The founding pharaoh of Egypt's 19th dynasty (reigned c. 1292 BC – c. 1290 BC) . Originally called Paramessu, Ramesses I was born into a noble military family from the Nile delta region. Horemheb, the last pharaoh of the 18th dynasty, appointed him as his Vizier, and later, as his heir.
Ramesses II the Great Pharaoh 19th dynasty reigned c. 1279 BC – c. 1213 BC He is regarded as Ancient Egypt's greatest and most powerful pharaoh. Ramesses II led successful expeditions north into Canaan, Lebanon and Syria and south into Nubia. He focused on building cities, temples and monuments and established the city of Pi-Ramesses in the Nile Delta as his new capital.
Ramesses III Usimare Pharaoh 20th dynasty reigned c. 1186 BC – c. 1155 BC The last great New Kingdom king to wield any substantial authority over Egypt. He was the son of Setnakhte and Queen Tiy-Merenese. During his long reign, Egypt was beset by foreign invaders (including the “Sea Peoples” and the Libyans).
Ramesses IV Heqamaatre Pharaoh 20th dynasty fl. c. mid-12th century BC he reigned c. 1155 BC – c. 1149 BC. A son of Ramesses III, he initiated a substantial building program including an enlargement of the Temple of Khonsu at Karnak. Also known as Amonhirkhopshef.
Ramesses V Usermare Sekhepenre Pharaoh 20th dynasty fl. c. mid-12th century BC The son of Ramesses IV and Queen Duatentopet. During his reign the power of the priesthood of Amun continued to grow, controlling the state’s finances and much of the temple land in the country at the expense of the pharaohs.
Ramesses VI Pharaoh 20th dynasty fl. c. mid-12th century BC A son of Ramesses III and Iset Ta-Hemdjert. Egypt's political and economic decline continued during his reign. At Thebes, the power of the chief priests of Amun continued to grow at the expense of the pharaohs.
Ramesses VII Usermaatre Meryamun Setepenre Pharaoh 20th dynasty fl. c. mid-12th century BC A son of Ramesses VI.
Ramesses VIII Usermare Akhenamun Pharaoh 20th dynasty fl. c. mid-12th century BC One of the last surviving sons of Ramesses III. Also known as Ramesses Sethherkhepshef Meryamun.
Ramesses IX Pharaoh 20th dynasty fl. c. late-12th century BC The son of Montuherkhopshef and grandson of Ramesses III. He reigned c. 1129 BC – c. 1111 BC.
Ramesses X Khepermare Pharaoh 20th dynasty fl. c. late-12th century BC A pharaoh of the 20th dynasty of Egypt (reigned c. 1111 BC – c. 1107 BC). He was possibly a son of Ramesses IX and husband of Queen Tyti, but this is unproven.
Ramesses XI Pharaoh 20th dynasty reigned c. 1107 BC – c. 1078 BC The last king of the 20th dynasty of Egypt. He was probably the son of Ramesses X and Queen Tyti. Ramesses XI's reign saw the continuing disintegration of the Egyptian state. By late in his reign, he was forced to share power with the High Priest of Amun, Herihor, who controlled Thebes and Upper Egypt, and Smendes, who as governor, controlled Lower Egypt.
Ramesses Prince 19th dynasty fl. c. mid-13th century BC The eldest son of Pharaoh Ramesses II and Queen Isetnofret. He was the heir to the Egyptian throne but pre-deceased his father.
Ramesses-Meryamun-Nebweben Prince 19th dynasty fl. c. mid-13th century BC A son of pharaoh Ramesses II.
Ramessesnakht High Priest of Amun 20th dynasty fl. c. mid-12th century BC Appointed as the High Priest of Amun at Thebes under pharaoh Ramesses IV. He held this office until the reign of Ramesses IX. It was during Ramessesnakht's tenure that the power and importance of the Amun priesthood grew while the pharaoh's power began to noticeably decline.
Ramose Prince 18th dynasty fl. c. late-16th century BC Probably the son of Pharaoh Ahmose I.
Ramose Vizier 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC A noble man, Governor of Thebes and vizier under pharaohs Amenhotep III and Akhenaten.
Raneb Pharaoh 2nd dynasty fl. c. late-29th to early-28th century BC A king during the 2nd dynasty of Egypt.
Ranefer Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A son of pharaoh Sneferu, the first ruler of the 4th dynasty of Egypt.
Rashepses Vizier 5th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC Rashepses served under pharaoh Djedkare Isesi.
Rawer Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC Great-grandson of Khufu, brother of Minkhaf II.
Rehuerdjersen Treasurer 12th dynasty fl. c. 20th century BC A treasurer who held this office under pharaoh Amenemhet I.
Rekhetre Queen 4th/ 5th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC An Egyptian queen from the late 4th dynasty or early 5th dynasty. She was a daughter of Pharaoh Khafra. Rekhetre was possibly the wife of one of Khafre's successors as pharaoh.
Rekhmire Vizier 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-15th century BC A noble and official, who served as Governor of Thebes and vizier during the reigns of Tuthmosis III and Amenhotep II. He was also High Priest of Annu or Heliopolis.
Renseneb Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. mid-18th century BC An Egyptian king of the 13th dynasty. Alternate spelling: Ranisonb.
Reptynub Queen 5th dynasty fl. c. 25th century BC She was the wife of King Nyuserre Ini. Her name is also written as Repytnub and Reputnebu.
Reputnebty Princess 5th dynasty fl. c. 25th century BC She was a daughter of pharaoh Nyuserre Ini and possibly queen Reptynub.
Roma-Roi High Priest of Amun 19th dynasty fl. c. mid to late-13th century BC High Priest of Amun towards the end of the reign of Ramesses II and into the reigns of Merenptah and possibly Seti II.
Rudamun Usermaatre Setepenamun Meryamun Pharaoh 23rd dynasty reigned c. 759 BC – c. 739 BC The last pharaoh of the 23rd dynasty based in Upper Egypt. He was the younger son of Osorkon III, and the brother of Takelot III.

S[edit]

Name Main Title Dynasty Date Comment
Sabef Official 1st dynasty fl. c. 29th century BC An Ancient Egyptian official under king Qa'a in the 1st dynasty.
Sabu called Ibebi High Priest of Ptah 5th and 6th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC A High Priest of Ptah during the reigns king Unas and king Teti.
Sabu called Thety High Priest of Ptah 6th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC A High Priest of Ptah during the reign of king Teti. He was the successor of Sabu Ibebi and probably his son.
Sahure Pharaoh 5th dynasty fl. c. 25th century BC Son of queen Neferhetepes and his father was probably Userkaf. Sahure established a navy and sent the fleet to Punt. He traded with states and cities in the Eastern Mediterranean.
Sakir-Har Pharaoh 15th dynasty fl. c. late-17th century BC A king of the Hyksos 15th dynasty of Egypt.
Salitis Pharaoh 15th dynasty fl. c. late-17th century BC The first pharaoh of the Hyksos 15th dynasty of Egypt. The Hyksos founded the city of Avaris which became their capital.
Sanakht Pharaoh 3rd dynasty fl. c. 27th century BC He reigned c. 2686 BC – c. 2668 BC, and was probably the first pharaoh of the 3rd dynasty of Egypt. Referred to as Sanakhte or Nebka.
Sankhenre Sewadjtu Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. mid-17th century BC A king of Egypt's 13th dynasty at a time when the kings’ control over all of Egypt was receding.
Satiah Queen 18th dynasty fl. c. early-15th century BC An Egyptian queen, the Great Royal Wife of Thutmose III. Also referred to as Sitiah or Sitioh.
Scota princess in Irish mythology, Scottish mythology, and pseudohistory, fl. c. 10th century BC An Egyptian princess,. Also referred to as Scotia .
Sedjefakare Amenemhat Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. mid-18th century BC An Egyptian king of the 13th dynasty.
Sehetepre Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. mid-18th century BC An Egyptian king of the 13th dynasty.
Sekhemib-Perenmaat Pharaoh 2nd dynasty fl. c. 28th century BC A king during the Egyptian 2nd dynasty, who may have been the same individual as Peribsen, or, more likely, was a separate king who ruled Lower Egypt at the same time that Peribsen ruled Upper Egypt.
Sekhemkare Vizier 5th dynasty fl. c. 25th century BC A vizier during the reigns of kings Userkaf and Sahure. He was a son of king Khafre and queen Hekenuhedjet.
Sekhemkare Pharaoh 13th dynasty see Amenemhat V Sekhemkare
Sekhemkhet Pharaoh 3rd dynasty fl. c. 27th century BC A pharaoh in Egypt during the 3rd dynasty.
Sekhemre Khutawy Sobekhotep I Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. early-18th century BC Sekhemre Khutawy Sobekhotep I was an Egyptian king of the 13th Dynasty
Sekhmakh Queen fl. c. mid-4th century BC The wife of the Nubian king Nastasen.
Semat Queen 1st dynasty fl. c. 30th century BC Possibly a wife of the 1st dynasty king Den.
Semenkare Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. mid-18th century BC An Egyptian king of the 13th Dynasty.
Semenre Pharaoh 16th dynasty fl. c. early 16th century BC A 16th dynasty Theban king during the Second Intermediate Period of Egypt who succeeded Nebiriau II.
Semerkhet Pharaoh 1st dynasty fl. c. 30th century BC A king during Egypt's 1st dynasty.
Senakhtenre Tao I Pharaoh 17th dynasty fl. c. 17th century BC He may have been the son of Nubkheperre Intef. Senakhtenre is a relatively obscure king who is not attested "by [any] contemporary sources (by his prenomen) but exclusively by sources dating from the New Kingdom: the Karnak Canon [of Tuthmose III] and [in] two Theban tombs."
Seneb Overseer of Dwarfs 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC Seneb was a dwarf who served as a high-ranking court official in the Old Kingdom.
Senebhenaf Vizier 13th dynasty fl. c. late-17th century BC A vizier during the 13th dynasty of the Second Intermediate Period.
Senebi Treasurer 13th dynasty fl. c. early-17th century BC A treasurer under the 13th dynasty Egyptian kings Neferhotep I and Sobekhotep IV.
Senedj Pharaoh 2nd dynasty fl. c. 28th century BC A king during the 2nd dynasty of Egypt who resided at Memphis.
Senedjemib Inti Vizier 5th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC A vizier, who served king Djedkare Isesi.
Senedjemib Mehi Vizier 6th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC A vizier who started out his career under king Djedkare Isesi and eventually became vizier under king Unas.
Senenmut Architect, Steward 18th dynasty fl. c. early-15th century BC An architect and government official. Senenmut entered royal service during the reign of Thutmose I or Thutmose II. After Hatshepsut became pharaoh, Senenmut became high steward.
Senewosret-Ankh Vizier 12th – 13th dynasty fl. c. 18th century BC He is known from a number of sources making it possible to reconstruct his career.
Senkamanisken King of Kush fl. c. mid-7th century BC A Nubian king based at Napata (reigned c. 640 BC – c. 620 BC). He was married to Queen Nasalsa who bore him two sons: Anlamani and Aspelta.
Sennedjem Artisan 19th dynasty fl. c. early-13th century BC An Egyptian artisan who lived in Deir el-Medina near Thebes during the reigns of the 19th dynasty pharaohs Seti I and Ramesses II. He worked on the excavation and decoration of the nearby royal tombs.
Sennefer Mayor of Thebes 18th dynasty fl. c. late-15th century BC Mayor of Thebes and "Overseer of the Granaries and Fields, Gardens and Cattle of Amun" during the reign of Amenhotep II. He was a son of Ahmose Humay, brother to Amenhotep II's vizier Amenemopet.
Sennefer Overseer of the Seal 18th dynasty fl. c. early to mid-15th century BC A long serving Egyptian official under pharaohs Thutmose II, Hatshepsut, and Thutmose III. His titles included "Overseer of the Seal" and "Overseer of the Gold-land of Amun".
Senneferi Overseer of the Seal 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-15th century BC Overseer of the Seal and "Overseer of the Gold-Land of Amun", during the reign of Thutmose III of the Egyptian 18th dynasty.
Senseneb Queen-Mother 18th dynasty fl. c. late 16th century BC The mother of pharaoh Thutmose I.
Senusret Vizier 12th dynasty fl. c. late-20th century BC An Egyptian official who was a vizier during the last years of king Senusret I's rule and in the first years of king Amenemhet II.
Senusret I Pharaoh 12th dynasty reigned c. 1971 BC – c. 1926 BC Son of Amenemhat I and Neferitatjenen. He continued his father's aggressive expansionist policies against Nubia. Senusret I established diplomatic relations with rulers in Syria and Canaan. He also tried to centralize the country's political structure by supporting nomarchs who were loyal to him. Also referred to as Sesostris I and Senwosret I.
Senusret II Pharaoh 12th dynasty reigned c. 1897 BC – c. 1878 BC Son of Amenemhat II. His pyramid was constructed at El-Lahun. Senusret II was interested in the Faiyum oasis region and began work on an extensive irrigation system. Senusret II maintained good relations with the various nomarchs of Egypt. Also referred to as Sesostris II and Senwosret II.
Senusret III Pharaoh 12th dynasty reigned c. 1878 BC – c. 1860 BC Son of Senusret II and Khnemetneferhedjet I. He built the Sesostris Canal and expanded Egyptian control deep into Nubia. His military campaigns gave rise to an era of peace and economic prosperity and he reduced the power of the nomarchs. Also referred to as Sesostris III and Senwosret III.
Seqenenre Tao II Pharaoh 17th dynasty fl. c. 16th century BC He probably was the son and successor to Senaktenre Tao I and Queen Tetisheri.
Serethor Queen 1st dynasty fl. c. 30th century BC Serethor was likely a wife of king Den.
Serfka Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A son of Nefermaat, the eldest son of pharaoh Sneferu, and Itet.
Seshemetka Queen 1st dynasty fl. c. 30th century BC Possibly a wife of king Den and the mother of Anedjib.
Sesheshet Queen-Mother 6th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC The mother of pharaoh Teti. She was instrumental in enabling her son to gain the throne and reconciling two warring factions of the royal family. Also known as Shesh.
Setau Viceroy of Kush 19th dynasty fl. c. 13th century BC Setau was the Viceroy of Kush in the second half of Ramesses II's reign.
Setepenre Princess 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC A daughter of Pharaoh Akhenaten and queen Nefertiti.
Seth-Peribsen Pharaoh 2nd dynasty fl. c. 28th century BC A king during the 2nd dynasty of Egypt.
Seti Commander 18th dynasty fl. c. late-14th century BC An Egyptian soldier during the late 18th dynasty, the commander of the army and later vizier. He was the father of Pharaoh Ramesses I. Also known as Suti.
Seti Viceroy of Kush 19th dynasty fl. c. 13th century BC The Viceroy of Kush Seti is attested in year 1 of Siptah. Seti is also mentioned on some monuments of his son Amenemhab. Amenemhab was the son of Seti and the Lady Amenemtaiauw. Seti held the titles fan-bearer on the king's right, king's scribe of the letters of the Pharaoh.
Seti I Menmaatre Pharaoh 19th dynasty reigned c. 1290 BC – c. 1279 BC The son of Ramesses I and Queen Sitre, and the father of Ramesses II. He reconquered most of the territories in Canaan and Syria disputed with the Hittites. Seti I also fought a series of wars in Libya and Nubia. Also referred to as Sethos I.
Seti II Userkheperure Setepenre Pharaoh 19th dynasty reigned c. 1203 BC – c. 1197 BC He was the son of Merneptah and queen Isetnofret II. Seti II had to deal with the accession of a rival named Amenmesse who seized control over Thebes and Nubia in Upper Egypt. Also referred to as Sethos II.
Seti-Merenptah Pharaoh 19th dynasty fl. c. early-12th century BC An Egyptian prince of the late 19th dynasty, a son of Pharaoh Seti II and Isetnofret II.
Setnakhte Userkhaure-Setepenre Pharaoh 20th dynasty fl. c. early-12th century BC The first pharaoh of the 20th dynasty of Egypt (reigned c. 1190 BC – c. 1186 BC) and the father of Ramesses III. He was either an usurper who seized the throne or a member of a minor line of the royal family who emerged as pharaoh.
Seuserenre Bebiankh Pharaoh 16th dynasty see Bebiankh
Sewadjkare Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. mid-17th century BC A pharaoh of the 13th dynasty of Egypt.
Sewadjkare Hori Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. mid-17th century BC A pharaoh of the 13th dynasty of Egypt.
Shabaka Neferkare Pharaoh 25th dynasty reigned c. 721 BC – c. 707 BC Shabaka is thought to be the son of King Kashta and Pebatjma, although a text from the time of Taharqa could be interpreted to mean that Shabaka was a brother of Taharqa and hence a son of Piye. He consolidated the Nubia’s control over Egypt from Nubia to the Delta region. Shabaka maintained Egypt's independence from the Assyrian empire under Sargon II. Also known as Shabataka
Shebitku Pharaoh 25th dynasty reigned c. 707 BC – c. 690 BC He was the nephew and successor of Shabaka and a son of Piye, the founder of the dynasty. Shebitku actively resisted Assyrian expansion under Sennacherib into Canaan.(or Shabatka)
Shedsu-nefertum High Priest of Ptah 21st – 22nd dynasty fl. c. late-10th century BC Shedsunefertem was the son of the High Priest Ankhefensekhmet and the lady Tapeshenese, who was First Chief of the Harem of Ptah and Prophetess of Mut.
Shepenupet I Divine Adoratrice of Amun 25th dynasty fl. c. mid-8th century BC She was the first Divine Adoratrice of Amun to wield political power in Thebes. She was a daughter of Osorkon III and Queen Karoadjet. Also called Shepenwpet I.
Shepenupet II Divine Adoratrice of Amun 25th dynasty fl. c. early-7th century BC She was the daughter of the first Kushite pharaoh Piye and sister of Piye's successors Taharqa and Shabaka. Also called Shepenwpet II.
Shepseska Prince 5th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A son of Nefermaat, the eldest son of pharaoh Sneferu, and Itet.
Shepseskaf Pharaoh 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC Possibly a son of the Egyptian king Menkaure who succeeded his father on the throne (reigned c. 2503 BC – c. 2498 BC). He was probably the last king of the 4th dynasty.
Shepseskare Isi Pharaoh 5th dynasty fl. c. 25th century BC He reigned c. 2467 BC – c. 2460 BC. Sometime referred to as Shepseskare, Sisiris.
Shepsesneb Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A son of Nefermaat, the eldest son of pharaoh Sneferu and Itet.
Shery Official 4th dynasty fl. c. 28th century BC An Egyptian official who probably lived during the 4th Dynasty. He was Great of the Ten of Upper Egypt and Chief of the wab-priest of Peribsen in the necropolis of Senedj.
Sheshi Maaibre Pharaoh 14th dynasty fl. c. early-17th century BC A 14th dynasty pharaoh of Egypt during the Second Intermediate Period.
Sheshonk I Hedjkheperre Setepenre Pharaoh 22nd dynasty reigned c. 943 BC – c. 922 BC He was a Meshwesh (Libyan) Berber king of Egypt and the founder of the 22nd Dynasty. He was the son of Nimlot, Great Chief of the Ma, and his wife Tentshepeh. Sheshonk I pursued an aggressive foreign policy against Syria, Philistine, Phoenicia, Judah and Israel. Also known as Shoshenq I, Sheshonk, Sheshonq I.
Sheshonk II Heqakheperre Pharaoh 22nd dynasty reigned c. 887 BC – c. 885 BC A king of the 22nd dynasty of Egypt.
Sheshonk III Usermaatre Setepenre Pharaoh 22nd dynasty reigned c. 837 BC – c. 798 BC His reign was marked by the loss of Egypt's political unity, with the appearance of Pedubast I at Thebes. Henceforth, the 22nd Dynasty kings only controlled Lower Egypt.
Sheshonk IV Hedjkheperre Setepenre Pharaoh 22nd dynasty reigned c. 798 BC – c. 785 BC A king during Egypt's 22nd dynasty. Also referred to as Shoshenq IV.
Shoshenq V Pharaoh 22nd dynasty reigned c. 778 BC – c. 740 BC The final king of the 22nd dynasty of Egypt of Meshwesh Libyans which controlled Lower Egypt. With his death, the kingdom in the Egyptian Delta disintegrated into various city states.
Shoshenq VI Pharaoh 23rd dynasty fl. c. late-9th century BC A 23rd Dynasty king based at Thebes (reigned c. 804 BC – c. 798 BC). He was defeated and ousted from power by Prince Osorkon (later Osorkon III).
Shoshenq High Priest of Amun 22nd dynasty fl. c. late-10th century BC The eldest son of pharaoh Osorkon I and queen Maatkare, the daughter of Psusennes II, and served as the High Priest of Amun at Thebes during his father's reign.
Shoshenq High Priest of Ptah 22nd dynasty fl. c. mid-9th century BC Shoshenq was the eldest son of Osorkon II and Queen Karomama.
Siamun Netjerkheperre-Setepenamun Pharaoh 21st dynasty reigned c. 986 BC – c. 967 BC Siamun doubled the size of the Temple of Amun at Tanis and initiated works at the Temple of Horus at Mesen. He embarked upon an active foreign policy.
Siamun Prince 18th dynasty fl. c. late-16th century BC He was the son of Pharaoh Ahmose I and Queen Ahmose Nefertari.
Siamun Prince 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-15th century BC A son of Pharaoh Thutmose III.
Siaspiqa King of Meroe fl. c. early-5th century BC A Kushite King of Meroe (reigned c. 487 BC – c. 468 BC).
Siatum Prince 18th dynasty fl. c. early-14th century BC He was probably one of the sons of Pharaoh Thutmose IV and thus the brother or half-brother of Amenhotep III.
Siese Vizier 12th dynasty fl. c. 20th century BC An Egyptian vizier and treasurer during the 12th dynasty. He was probably vizier under pharaoh Amenemhat II. Also called Zaaset.
Simut called Kyky Second Prophet of Amun 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC An Egyptian priest who held the position of Second Prophet of Amun towards the end of the reign of the 18th dynasty Pharaoh Amenhotep III. Simut was also treasurer (“Overseer of the House of Silver”) and “sealer of every contract in Karnak”.
Siptah Akhenre Setepenre Pharaoh 19th dynasty fl. c. late-13th to early-12th century BC His father's identity is unknown with both Seti II and Amenmesse being suggested. Siptah succeeded to the throne as a child after the death of Seti II. Also known as Merneptah Siptah.
Sitamun Queen 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC She was the eldest daughter of Pharaoh Amenhotep III and his wife Tiye and later married her father.
Sitdjehuti Queen 17th dynasty fl. c. mid-16th century BC She was a daughter of Pharaoh Senakhtenre Tao I and the sister to Pharaoh Seqenenre Tao II and the queens Ahhotep and Ahmose Inhapy. She was married to her (half-)brother Tao II.
Sithathoriunet Princess 12th dynasty fl. c. mid-19th century BC She was possibly a daughter of Senusret II.
Sitre Queen 19th dynasty fl. ca 13th century BC Wife of Pharaoh Ramesses I of Egypt and mother of Seti I. Also called Tia-Sitre.
Sitre In Nurse 18th dynasty fl. c. late-16th century BC The nurse of the female pharaoh Hatshepsut.
Smendes Hedjkheperre Setepenre Pharaoh 21st dynasty fl. c. early to mid-11th century BC The first pharaoh of the 21st dynasty of Egypt (reigned c. 1077 BC – c. 1052 BC). He is thought to have been a powerful governor in Lower Egypt during the reign of Ramesses XI.
Smendes II High Priest of Amun 21st dynasty fl. c. early-10th century BC He was a son of High Priest Menkheperre and Princess Isetemkheb, the daughter of Psusennes I. Also known as Nesbanebdjed II
Smenkhkare Pharaoh 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC He was probably a younger son of Amenhotep III and queen Tiye, and therefore a younger brother of Akhenaten.
Sneferu Pharaoh 4th dynasty reigned c. 2613 BC – c. 2589 BC He built at least three pyramids at Dahshur (including the Bent Pyramid and the Red Pyramid) and Meidum (Meidum pyramid). He introduced major innovations in the design and construction of pyramids. Also known as Snefru, Snofru or Soris.
Sneferukhaf Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC He was a son of Prince Nefermaat II and a grandson of Princess Nefertkau.
Sobekemhat Vizier 12th dynasty fl. c. mid-19th century BC An Egyptian vizier under king Senusret III during the 12th dynasty.
Sobekemsaf I Pharaoh 17th dynasty fl. c. early-16th century BC Sekhemre Shedtawy Sobekemsaf reigned during the Second Intermediate Period. Sobekemsaf I is thought to have been the father of both Intef VI and Intef VII.
Sobekemsaf II Sekhemrewadjkhaw Pharaoh 17th dynasty fl. c. mid-16th century BC He may have reigned after Djehuti and Intef VI. Sobekemsaf's chief wife was Queen Nubemhet.
Sobekhotep I Khaankhre Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. mid-18th century BC An Egyptian king of the 13th Dynasty. He appears in the Turin King List as Sobekhotep and is otherwise mainly known from reliefs coming from a chapel set up in Abydos, from a pedestal of a statue and from a fragment of a column.
Sobekhotep II Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. late-18th century BC An Egyptian king of the 13th Dynasty.
Sobekhotep III Sekhemresewdjtawy Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. late-18th century BC His father was Mentuhotep. His mother was Jewetibaw. The king had two wives, Senebhenas and Neni.
Sobekhotep IV Khaneferre Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. early-17th century BC He was the son of Haankhef and Kemi. His brother, Neferhotep I, was his predecessor on the throne.
Sobekhotep V Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. early-17th century BC Sobekhotep Merhotepre was an Egyptian king.
Sobekhotep VI Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. early-17th century BC Sobekhotep Khahotepre was an Egyptian king.
Sobekhotep VIII Sekhemre Susertawi Pharaoh 16th dynasty fl. c. late-17th century BC He is believed to be the successor of Djehuti. He reigned over Upper Egypt during the time of the Hyksos conquest of Memphis and Lower Egypt.
Sobeknakht II Governor 16th dynasty fl. c. early-16th century BC A local governor at El-Kab and a supporter of the Theban 16th dynasty during the Second Intermediate Period.
Sobekneferu Pharaoh/ Queen 12th dynasty reigned c. 1807 BC – c. 1803 BC She was a daughter of Pharaoh Amenemhat III. Also known as Neferusobek.
Sosibius Chief Minister Ptolemaic fl. c. late 3rd century BC The chief minister of Ptolemy IV Philopator. He was able to exercise great power through his influence over the king throughout Ptolemy IV’s reign. Based on Sosibius' advice, Ptolemy IV put to death his uncle Lysimachus, his brother Magas, and his mother Berenice.
Sosibius of Tarentum Captain of the Guard Ptolemaic fl. c. mid-3rd century BC One of the captains of the body-guards of Ptolemy II Philadelphus, king of Egypt. He may have been the father of the Sosibius, chief minister to Ptolemy IV Philopator.

T[edit]

Name Main Title Dynasty Date Comment
Tabekenamun Queen 25th dynasty fl. c. late-8th century BC Tabekenamun was a daughter of King Piye and may have been a queen consort to her brother Taharqa or to Shabaka.
Tabiry Queen 25th dynasty fl. c. mid-8th century BC Tabiry was the daughter of Alara of Nubia and his wife Kasaqa and the wife of King Piye.
Tadukhipa Queen 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC A daughter of Tushratta, king of Mitanni and his queen, Juni. Tushratta married his daughter to his ally pharaoh Amenhotep III to cement their two states' alliances. Amenhotep III died shortly after Tadukhipa arrived in Egypt so she eventually married his son and heir Akhenaten. Her name is sometime written as Tadu-Hepa.
Taharqa Pharaoh 25th dynasty reigned c. 690 BC – c. 664 BC He was the son of Piye, the Nubian king of Napata who had first conquered Egypt. During his reign, Assyria forces under General Esarhaddon invaded Egypt and managed to conquer Lower Egypt putting Neto I on the throne in Sias.
Takahatenamun Queen 25th dynasty 8th century BC She was the daughter of King Piye and the sister-wife of King Taharqa.
Takelot I Hedjkheperre Setepenre Pharaoh 22nd dynasty reigned c. 885 BC – c. 872 BC He was a son of Osorkon I and Queen Tashedkhonsu. He married Kapes who bore him a son, Osorkon II. Takelot I's authority was not fully recognised in Upper Egypt where a local Theban king challenged his authority.
Takelot II Si-Ese Hedjkheperre Setepenre Pharaoh 23rd dynasty reigned c. 840 BC – c. 815 BC A Pharaoh and High Priest of Amun, ruling Middle and Upper Egypt separately from the Tanite 22nd dynasty kings who at that time only controlled Lower Egypt.
Takelot III Si-Ese Usimare Setepenamun Pharaoh 23rd dynasty reigned c. 774 BC – c. 759 BC He was Osorkon III's eldest son and successor and High Priest of Amun at Thebes.
Takhat Queen 19th dynasty fl. c. late 13th century BC The mother of the usurper pharaoh Amenmesse. She was a queen consort to either Merenptah or Seti II.
Takhat Queen-Mother 20th dynasty fl. c. late 13th century BC The mother of pharaoh Ramesses IX and probably the wife of Montuherkhepeshef, a son of Ramesses III.
Takhuit Queen 26th dynasty fl. c. 6th century BC Takhuit was the wife of Psamtik II and the mother of Pharaoh Apries and the God's Wife of Amun Ankhnesneferibre.
Talakhamani King of Kush fl. c. mid-5th century BC A Kushite King of Meroe (reigned c. 435 BC – c. 431 BC). He may have been a son of Nasakhma and a younger brother of Malewiebamani. It is also possible Talakhamani was a son of Malewiebamani.
Tantamani Pharaoh 25th dynasty reigned c. 664 BC – c. 656 BC After the Assyrians had appointed Necho I as king and left Egypt, Tantamani marched from Nubia, killed Necho I in battle and reoccupied all of Egypt. The Assyrians returned to Egypt defeated Tantamani's army and effectively ended Nubian control over Egypt. Also known as Tandaname, Tanwetamani or Tementhes.
Tao I the Elder Pharaoh 17th dynasty fl. c. mid-16th century BC A pharaoh of the 17th dynasty of Egypt who was based in Upper Egypt during the Second Intermediate Period.
Tao II Seqenenre the Brave Pharaoh 17th dynasty fl. c. mid-16th century BC Ruled over the local kingdoms of the Theban region of Egypt in the 17th dynasty (reigned c. 1558 BC – c. 1554 BC) . He probably was the son and successor to Senaktenre Tao I and Queen Tetisheri. Also known as Sekenenra Taa.
Tashedkhonsu Queen 22nd dynasty fl. c. late-10th century BC Wife of Pharaoh Osorkon I and the mother of Pharaoh Takelot I.
Tawerettenru Queen 20th dynasty fl. c. mid-12th century BC The Royal Wife of Ramesses V.
Tefnakht Shepsesre Pharaoh 24th dynasty reigned c. 732 BC – c. 725 BC A Libyan-descended prince of Sais, Great Chief of the Meshwesh and Great Chief of the Libu, and founder of the 24th dynasty of Egypt. Tefnakht established his capital at Sais and was able to unify many of the cities of the Delta region. Also known as Tnephachthos.
Tefnakht II Local King 25th dynasty fl. c. early-7th century BC A native king who ruled Sais during the 25th Nubian Dynasty of Egypt.
Tentamun Princess 18th dynasty fl. c. late-15th century BC A daughter of Thutmose IV.
Tentamun Queen 20th dynasty fl. c. late-12th century BC Probably the wife of Ramesses XI, last ruler of the 20th dynasty.
Tentamun Queen 21st dynasty fl. c. mid-11th century BC The wife of the 21st dynasty pharaoh Smendes. She was probably the daughter of Ramesses XI, last ruler of the 20th dynasty.
Tentkheta Queen 26th dynasty fl. c. mid-6th century BC Wife of Amasis II. She was a daughter of a priest of Ptah named Padineith. She was the mother of Pharaoh Psamtik III. Also known as Tanetkheta
Teos Pharaoh 30th dynasty fl. c. mid-4th century BC A 30th dynasty pharaoh of Egypt (reigned 362 BC – 360 BC) who was overthrown by Nectanebo II with the aid of Agesilaus II of Sparta and was forced to flee to Persia. The Persian king Artaxerxes II gave him refuge and Teos lived in Persian exile until his death.
Teta Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A son of Nefermaat, the eldest son of pharaoh Sneferu, and Itet.
Teti Pharaoh 6th dynasty reigned c. 2345 BC – c. 2333 BC The first pharaoh of the 6th dynasty of Egypt. Teti was either murdered by his palace bodyguards in a harem plot or assassinated by the usurper Userkare. Also known by the name Othoes.
Teti, Son of Minhotep Temple Official 17th dynasty 16th century BC? An Egyptian official in Coptos during the reign of the Seventeenth Dynasty Pharaoh, Nubkheperre Intef. Known from the Coptos Decree, which deprives him of his office and its stipend for some act of sacrilege.
Tetisheri Queen 17th dynasty fl. c. mid-16th century BC Wife of pharaoh Senakhtenre Tao I and the mother of Seqenenre Tao II, Queen Ahhotep I and possibly Kamose.
Tey Queen 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC The wife of Kheperkheprure Ay who was a pharaoh of Egypt's 18th dynasty.
Thamphthis Pharaoh 4th dynasty fl. c. mid-25th century BC The Greek name of an Egyptian king of the 4th dynasty. His original Egyptian name is lost, but it may have been Djedefptah or Ptahdjedef.
Thutmose I Pharaoh 18th dynasty reigned c. 1506 BC – c. 1493 BC During his reign, he campaigned deep into the Levant and Nubia, pushing the borders of Egypt further than ever before. He built many temples throughout Egypt and was the first pharaoh to build a tomb for himself in the Valley of the Kings. His name is sometimes written as Thothmes, Thutmosis or Tuthmosis I.
Thutmose II Pharaoh 18th dynasty reigned c. 1493 BC – c. 1479 BC Son of Thutmose I and Queen Mutnofret. He built some minor monuments and initiated some minor campaigns. Thutmose II was probably strongly influenced by his wife and royal half-sister Hatshepsut.
Thutmose III Pharaoh 18th dynasty reigned c. 1479 BC – c. 1425 BC During the early years of his reign, he was co-regent with his stepmother, Hatshepsut, who was named the pharaoh. After her death, he created the largest empire Egypt had ever seen. He conducted at least seventeen campaigns and he conquered lands from northern Syria to the fourth cataract of the Nile.
Thutmose IV Pharaoh 18th dynasty reigned c. 1401 BC – c. 1391 BC Son of Amenhotep II and Tiaa. Known for the restoration of the Sphinx at Giza.
Thutmose Prince 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC The eldest son of pharaoh Amenhotep III and Queen Tiye. His apparent early death led to Akhenaten becoming the successor to Amenhotep III. Also known as Djhutmose.
Thutmose Sculptor 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC The official court sculptor of the Egyptian Pharaoh Akhenaten in the latter part of his reign. Also known as Djhutmose or Thutmosis
Thutmose Vizier 19th dynasty fl. c. mid-13th century BC Vizier during the latter part of the reign of Ramesses II.
Tia Princess 19th dynasty fl. c. mid-13th century BC The daughter of Pharaoh Seti I and Queen Tuya and the elder sister of Ramesses II. Married to a noble man also called Tia. Buried with her husband in Saqqara.
Tiaa Queen 18th dynasty fl. c. late-15th century BC She was the wife of Pharaoh Amenhotep II and the mother of Thutmose IV.
Tiaa Princess 18th dynasty fl. c. early-14th century BC She was a daughter of Pharaoh Thutmose IV.
Tiaa Queen 19th dynasty fl. c. late-13th century BC Possibly a wife of Pharaoh Seti II.
Tiye Queen 18th dynasty fl. c. early to mid-14th century BC The daughter of Yuya and Tjuyu. She was the Great Royal Wife of pharaoh Amenhotep III and matriarch of the Amarna family from which many members of the royal family of Ancient Egypt were to come.
Tiye Queen 20th dynasty fl. c. early-12th century BC A wife of Ramesses III. She instigated a failed "harem conspiracy" to kill the king and place Tiye's son Pentawer on the throne, instead of the appointed heir, who was the son of queen Iset Ta-Hemdjert.
Tiy-Merenese Queen 20th dynasty fl. c. early-12th century BC The wife of Setnakhte and mother of Ramesses III. Her name is sometimes written as Teye-Merenaset or Tiye-Mereniset.
Tjanefer Fourth Prophet of Amun 21st dynasty fl. c. late-11th century BC A 21st dynasty Egyptian priest. His father was Nesipaherenmut, the Fourth Prophet of Amun, his mother was Isetemheb. He married Gautseshen, the daughter of High Priest Menkheperre and Princess Isetemkheb.
Tjuyu Noble woman 18th dynasty fl. c. early-14th century BC An Egyptian noblewoman and the mother of queen Tiye, wife of pharaoh Amenhotep III. Also known as Thuya, Thuyu and Tuya.
Tlepolemus Regent, Military Governor Ptolemaic fl. c. late-3rd century BC Regent of Egypt during the reign of the boy king Ptolemy V. Tlepolemus was military governor of Pelusium when the regent Agathocles and his family were overthrown and killed in a popular uprising. Tlepolemus briefly took Agathocles' place as regent until he was replaced by Aristomenes of Alyzia.
Tryphaena Queen Ptolemaic c. 141 BC – 111 BC A Ptolemaic princess and Seleucid queen. She was the oldest daughter of the Egyptian king Ptolemy VIII and Cleopatra III. She married the Seleucid king Antiochus VIII Grypus and was queen of Syria (124 BC – 111 BC).
Tutankhamun Pharaoh 18th dynasty c. 1341 – c. 1323 BC Tutankhamen reigned c. 1333 BC – c. 1323 BC. He married his half sister, Ankhesenpaaten, who later changed her name to Ankhesenamun. He ended the worship of the god, Aten and restored the god Amun to supremacy. The capital of Egypt was moved back to Thebes.
Tutkheperre Shoshenq Pharaoh 22nd dynasty fl. c. early-9th century BC A 22nd dynasty Libyan king of Egypt.
Tutu Official 18th dynasty fl. c. 14th century BC Tutu, the Egyptian official, was one of pharaoh's officials during the Amarna letters period.
Tuya Queen 19th dynasty fl. c. early-13th century BC The wife of Pharaoh Seti I and mother of Ramesses II. Also known as Tuy and Mut-Tuya.
Twosret Pharaoh, Queen 19th dynasty fl. c. early 12th century BC The last pharaoh of the 19th Dynasty of Egypt. She was a royal wife of Seti II. She was regent to Seti's heir Siptah. When Siptah died, Twosret officially assumed the throne. Twosret's reign ended in a civil war leading to her successor Setnakhte founding the 20th dynasty. Also known as Tawosret and Tausret.
Tyti Queen 20th dynasty fl. c. late-12th century BC An Egyptian queen of the 20th dynasty. She may have been married to Ramesses X.

U[edit]

Name Main Title Dynasty Date Comment
Udjebten Queen 6th dynasty fl. c. 23rd or 24th century BC A wife of Pharaoh Pepi II. Her name is also written as Wadjebten.
Unas Pharaoh 5th dynasty reigned c. 2375 BC – c. 2345 BC The last 5th dynasty pharaoh of Egypt. Unas may have had two queen consorts, Khenut and Nebit. His name is also written as Oenas, Unis, Wenis, or Ounas.
Useramen Vizier 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-15th century BC A vizier of Egypt under Hatshepsut and Tuthmosis III. Also known as User and Amenuser.
Userhet Overseer of the Fields of Amun 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-15th century BC Userhet was buried in the Valley of the Kings, in tomb KV45. He probably lived during the rule of Thutmose IV.
Userkaf Pharaoh 5th dynasty reigned c. 2498 BC – c. 2491 BC The first 5th dynasty king of Egypt. He started the tradition of building sun temples at Abusir. He constructed the Pyramid of Userkaf complex at Saqqara.
Userkare Pharaoh 6th dynasty fl. c. 24th century BC He is considered to be either a usurper to the throne after Teti or he could have been a son of Teti and Queen Khuit.
Usermontu Vizier 18th dynasty fl. c. mid-14th century BC He served during the reign of Pharaoh Tutankhamun.

W[edit]

Name Main Title Dynasty Date Comment
Wadjmose Prince 18th dynasty fl. c. late-16th century BC A son of Pharaoh Thutmose I.
Wahibre Ibiau Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. mid-17th century BC An Egyptian king of the 13th Dynasty.
Wahkare Khety I Pharaoh 9th dynasty fl. c. 22nd century BC A pharaoh in the 9th dynasty of Egypt controlling territories based around Herakleopolis.
Webensenu Prince 18th dynasty fl. c. late-15th century BC He was a son of Pharaoh Amenhotep II.
Wegaf Khutawyre Pharaoh 13th dynasty fl. c. late-19th century BC An Egyptian king of the 13th Dynasty, also known as Ugaf.
Wehemka Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC A son of Nefermaat, the eldest son of pharaoh Sneferu and Itet.
Weneg Pharaoh 2nd dynasty fl. c. 28th century BC Weneg was the royal Nebti name of a pharaoh during the 2nd dynasty of Egypt. He is assumed to have been a king who ruled Egypt between Nynetjer and Khasekhemwy. He is also referred to as Wneg or Wadjnes or Tlas.
Weni the Elder Court Official, General 6th dynasty fl. c. late 24th to early 23rd centuries BC A court official of the 6th dynasty of Egypt. He began his career under Teti, and served as a general under Pepi I Meryre and as governor of Upper Egypt during the reign of Merenre Nemtyemsaf I.
Wentawat Viceroy of Kush 20th dynasty fl. c. 12th century BC Wentawat (also written as Wentawuat), was Viceroy of Kush under Ramesses IX. Wentawat was possibly a son of the Viceroy Hori II
Wetka Prince 4th dynasty fl. c. 26th century BC Wetka was a son of Prince Khufukhaf I and Nefertkau II, and a grandson of Khufu.

Y[edit]

Name Main Title Dynasty Date Comment
Yanhamu Prostitute 18th dynasty fl. c. 14th century BC An Egyptian commissioner mentioned in the 1350-1335 BC Amarna letters correspondence. His name has also been read as Yenhamu, and Enhamu.
Yaqub-Har Pharaoh 15th dynasty fl. c. late-17th century BC He was a Hyksos ruler during Egypt's fragmented Second Intermediate Period. His name is sometimes written as Yakubher, or Yak-Baal.
Yuny Steward 19th dynasty fl. c. early to mid-13th century BC An official during the reign of pharaoh Ramesses II. He served as chief scribe of the court, the overseer of priests and royal steward. Yuni started building projects at Amara West and Aksha. His name is sometimes written as Iuny.
Yuya Master of the Horse 18th dynasty fl. c. early-14th century BC An Egyptian courtier of the 18th dynasty of Egypt. He was the King’s Lieutenant and Master of the Horse. He married Tjuyu who held high offices in governmental and religious hierarchies. Their daughter, Tiye, became queen to Amenhotep III. His name is sometimes written as Iouiya.

Z[edit]

Name Main Title Dynasty Date Comment
Zamonth Vizier 12th dynasty c. 1800 BC Also known as Samonth. An Ancient Egyptian vizier who was in office at the end of the Twelfth Dynasty
Zannanza Hittite Prince 18th dynasty c. 14th century BC Prince Zannanza (died c. 1324 BC) was a son of Suppiluliuma I, king of the Hittites. He is best known for almost becoming the Pharaoh of Egypt and because his death caused a diplomatic incident between the Hittite Empire and Egypt, that resulted in warfare.
Zoser Pharaoh 3rd dynasty c. 27th century BC See Djoser

See also[edit]

Other articles including lists of ancient Egyptians: