1921 in the United Kingdom

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1921 in the United Kingdom
Other years
1919 | 1920 | 1921 (1921) | 1922 | 1923
Constituent countries of the United Kingdom
Ireland | Scotland | Wales
Popular culture

Events from the year 1921 in the United Kingdom.

Incumbents[edit]

Events[edit]

January to June[edit]

July to December[edit]

Undated[edit]

  • The Scottish county of Haddingtonshire is renamed East Lothian.
  • Wicksteed Park in Kettering opens as the first inland amusement park in England.
  • An exceptionally dry year over England and Wales with only 629.0 millimetres (24.8 in) making it the driest year on record since 1788, and not approached subsequently – the nearest being 1854 with 672.9 millimetres (26.5 in), 1864 with 703.3 millimetres (27.7 in), 1887 with 669.3 millimetres (26.4 in) and 1933 with 717.7 millimetres (28.3 in), 1964 with 725.5 millimetres (28.6 in) and 1973 with 739.9 millimetres (29.1 in).[28] In South East England the average is only 396.4 millimetres (15.6 in)[28] with some stations recording less than 300 millimetres (11.8 in). It reached 34C (94F) in Southern and Eastern England on 10 and 11 July.[29]

Publications[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Penguin Pocket On This Day. Penguin Reference Library. 2006. ISBN 0-14-102715-0.
  2. ^ Steinmeyer, Jim (2003). Hiding the Elephant: How Magicians Invented the Impossible. Random House. pp. 277–295.
  3. ^ Boothroyd, David (2001). Politico's Guide to the History of British Political Parties. London: Politico's Publishing. p. 15. ISBN 1-902301-59-5.
  4. ^ "Build-up to the General Strike". Coventry: Modern Records Centre, University of Warwick. 13 August 2019. Retrieved 22 August 2020.
  5. ^ a b Century of Struggle (PDF). p. 39. Retrieved 22 August 2020.
  6. ^ "R 37". The Airship Heritage Trust. 6 July 2019. Retrieved 22 August 2020.
  7. ^ The History Today Companion to British History. London: Collins & Brown. 1995. pp. 538–9. ISBN 1-85585-178-4.
  8. ^ "Timeline". The Union Makes Us Strong: TUC History Online. Retrieved 22 August 2020.
  9. ^ Statutory Rules & Orders published by authority, 1921, No. 533.
  10. ^ Jackson, Alvin (2004). Home Rule – An Irish History. Oxford University Press. p. 198.
  11. ^ It is estimated that between 1,000 and 2,000 people actually attended the match; Manchester United and Derby County had played immediately beforehand, and some of the spectators for that match had stayed on to watch the Stockport match for free. However, only thirteen people paid at the gate to watch the Stockport match by itself, staged here because bottom-of the-League Stockport's home ground had been closed due to earlier crowd trouble. "Two grounds have doubled up on staging League matches on the same day". footballsite.co.uk. Archived from the original on 31 July 2013. Retrieved 8 May 2012.
  12. ^ "Our history". Royal British Legion. Archived from the original on 24 February 2011. Retrieved 9 February 2011.
  13. ^ Foy, Michael T (2006). Michael Collins's Intelligence War. pp. 214–218. ISBN 0-7509-4267-3.
  14. ^ http://www.london-weather.eu/article.61.html
  15. ^ "Parades and Marches – Chronology 2: Historical Dates and Events". Conflict Archive on the Internet (CAIN). Retrieved 28 January 2010.
  16. ^ "History of Dental Surgery in Edinburgh". Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh. Archived from the original on 13 February 2011. Retrieved 14 January 2011.
  17. ^ McDonald, Andrew (1989). "The Geddes Committee and the Formulation of Public Expenditure Policy, 1921–1922". The Historical Journal. 32 (3): 643–74. doi:10.1017/s0018246x00012462. JSTOR 2639537.
  18. ^ Driggs, Laurence La Tourette (7 September 1921). "The Fall of the Airship". The Outlook. New York. 129: 14–15.
  19. ^ Smith, Alfred Emanuel (21 September 1921). "Lessons of the ZR-2". The Outlook. New York. 129: 80, 82.
  20. ^ Bishop, Peter (19 August 2010). "History". TheCowsheds.co.uk. Archived from the original on 25 June 2014. Retrieved 18 February 2014.
  21. ^ "Results : Saturday 27th August 1921". statto.com. Archived from the original on 22 February 2014. Retrieved 18 February 2014.
  22. ^ Branson, Noreen (1979). Poplarism, 1919–1925: George Lansbury and the councillors' revolt. Lawrence and Wishart.
  23. ^ Booth, Janine (2009). Guilty and Proud of it – Poplar's Rebel Councillors and Guardians 1919–1925. Merlin Press. ISBN 978-0-85036-694-5.
  24. ^ "Shackleton Returns to Europe". South-Pole.com. Archived from the original on 11 August 2007. Retrieved 19 August 2007.
  25. ^ "Fact sheet: Women at Cambridge: A Chronology". University of Cambridge. 2010. Archived from the original on 7 November 2007. Retrieved 13 September 2010.
  26. ^ Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. pp. 490–491. ISBN 0-304-35730-8.
  27. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1921". NobelPrize.org.
  28. ^ a b Hadley Centre. "Monthly England & Wales precipitation". Meteorological Office. Retrieved 18 February 2014.
  29. ^ "TORRO - British Weather Extremes: Daily Maximum Temperatures". Archived from the original on 16 October 2015.
  30. ^ Leavis, Q. D. (1965). Fiction and the Reading Public (rev. ed.). London: Chatto & Windus.
  31. ^ Ann Evory (April 1978). Contemporary Authors. Gale. ISBN 978-0-8103-0035-4.
  32. ^ Woddis, Carole (18 March 2013). "Frank Thornton obituary". the Guardian. Retrieved 28 October 2021.
  33. ^ "Patricia Robins. Sprightly and prolific writer of romance novels who during the war worked in a top-secret RAF filter room". The Times. Retrieved 4 January 2017.
  34. ^ Gaston, Georg (1981). Jack Clayton: A Guide to References and Resources. G.K. Hall. p. 1. ISBN 978-0-8161-8524-5.
  35. ^ "Geoffrey Chater obituary". TheGuardian.com. 25 October 2021.
  36. ^ Deborah Andrews (1992). Annual Obituary, 1991. St. James Press. p. 299. ISBN 978-1-55862-175-6.
  37. ^ "Field Marshal Sir Roland Gibbs". The Telegraph. 2 November 2004.
  38. ^ "Jean Kent". BFI. Retrieved 29 June 2021.
  39. ^ R. Natov, Leon Garfield (New York: Twayne Publishers, 1994) Page 5
  40. ^ Adrian Room (2014). Dictionary of Pseudonyms: 13,000 Assumed Names and Their Origins, 5th ed. McFarland. p. 228. ISBN 978-0-7864-5763-2.
  41. ^ "Obituaries: Deborah Kerr". The Daily Telegraph. London. 19 October 2007. Retrieved 20 June 2020.