2017 in the United Kingdom

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

United Kingdom 2017 in the United Kingdom United Kingdom
Other years
2015 | 2016 | 2017 (2017) | 2018 | 2019
Individual countries of the United Kingdom
England | Northern Ireland | Scotland | Wales
Sport, television and music

Events from the year 2017 in the United Kingdom.

Incumbents[edit]

Events[edit]

January[edit]

  • 1 January – Kingston upon Hull begins its City of Culture programme with a 10-minute fireworks display over the Marina.[1]
  • 2 January
    • Rail fares increase by an average of 2.3%, higher than inflation and continuing the trend in soaring ticket prices.[2]
    • The government announces proposals to build seventeen new towns and villages across the English countryside.[3]
  • 3 January
  • 4 January
    • The British clothing retailer Next warns of a bleak outlook as its shares fall by 12%. It reports falling sales and warns that 2017 will be "challenging".[6]
    • Sir Tim Barrow is appointed as the UK's new ambassador to the European Union.[7]
  • 5 January
    • UK car sales were at a record high in 2016 according to the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT), which says that 2,690,000 new cars were registered last year, 2% higher than in 2015.[8]
    • The Royal Parks announces that the Changing of the Guard ceremony will be held on fixed days of the week (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays) instead of alternate days for a three-month trial period owing to tightened security.[9]
  • 6 January – TV chef Jamie Oliver announces that his company is to close six of its 42 Italian restaurants across the UK which will affect 120 staff, whom the company says it would try to place in other parts of the chain.[10]
  • 7 January – The British Red Cross describes the current situation in England's NHS hospitals as a "humanitarian crisis".[11]
  • 8 January
  • 9 January
    • A strike by workers on London Underground causes travel chaos and crowding in London, with much of the Tube network shut down.[14]
    • Northern Ireland's Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness resigns.[15]
    • 9-year-old Katie Rough is found murdered in the Woodthorpe area of York. A local 15-year-old girl is arrested and charged with her murder.
  • 10 January – The Post Office announces it will close its 37 crown office branches, with the loss of 300 jobs and 127 specialist roles.
  • 11 January – The Royal College of Nursing describes conditions in the NHS as the worst they have ever experienced. In a separate move, fifty leading doctors write to the Prime Minister, warning that lives are being put at risk due to mounting pressures on the health service.[16]
  • 12 January
    • Plans for a 1.8-mile road tunnel on the A303 near Stonehenge in Wiltshire are finalised by the UK Government.[17]
    • A government-commissioned review gives backing to a tidal lagoon planned for Swansea Bay in Wales. The £1,300,000,000 project could have a lifetime of 120 years and supply 8% of UK energy.[18]
  • 13 January – Tristram Hunt of the Labour Party resigns as MP for Stoke-on-Trent Central to become the director of the V&A in London.[19]
  • 16 January
  • 17 January – The Prime Minister gives a speech on her plans for Brexit in which she outlines a "hard" Brexit plan from the EU, to include leaving the single market.[22]
  • 18 January – A£14,000,000,000 consumer claim against MasterCard proceeds to a first hearing, with the Competition Appeal Tribunal set to decide if the case can proceed as a collective action.[23]
  • 19 January – The first of many British tourists in The Gambia return home to the UK, after escaping due to political unrest in the West African nation.[24]
  • 21 January – 2017 Women's March: thousands of people march in London, Belfast, Cardiff, Lancaster, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Shipley, Edinburgh and Bristol – as well as millions more in countries around the world – in protest at Donald Trump's inauguration as 45th President of the United States.[25]
  • 24 January – The UK Supreme Court rules against the Government's Brexit appeal case by an 8 to 3 decision, stating that Parliament must vote to trigger Article 50.[26]
  • 30 January – A petition to stop US President Donald Trump's UK state visit gathers more than 1.8 million signatures.[27]

February[edit]

  • 1 February
  • 3 February
  • 6 February – The Queen commemorates her Sapphire Jubilee.
  • 7 February – Plans for building more homes in England are revealed by the government, after ministers say that the housing market is "broken".[29]
  • 8 February – Labour MP Clive Lewis resigns from the Shadow Cabinet in protest over his party's decision to whip its MPs into voting to trigger Article 50.[30]
  • 15 February – The European Commission issues a "final warning" to the United Kingdom over the breaching of air pollution limits.[31]
  • 17 February – Brooklyn Beckham, author, photographer and son of David Beckham, falls and breaks his arm after excessive use of Hoverboard
  • 18 February – Lincoln City F.C. become the first non-league team to reach the FA Cup quarter-finals for 103 years with a 1–0 victory over Burnley.[35]
  • 20 February – Protests are held in London and other cities across the UK, as MPs debate whether the new US President Donald Trump should be given a state visit.[36]
  • 21 February – A heterosexual couple, Rebecca Steinfeld and Charles Keidan, lose their Court of Appeal case in which they sought to be granted civil partnership instead of a traditional marriage.[37]
  • 22 February
  • 23 February
    • By-elections are held in Copeland and Stoke-on-Trent Central to fill vacancies arising from the resignation of sitting Labour MPs. Trudy Harrison wins the Copeland seat for the Conservative Party and Gareth Snell retains the Stoke-on-Trent Central seat for the Labour Party. Labour had held the Copeland seat since its creation, and the Tory win is the first gain by a serving government in a by-election for 35 years.[40]
    • Britain is hit by winds of up to 94 mph from Storm Doris, causing travel disruption and a number of casualties.[41]
  • 26 February

March[edit]

  • 2 March – New elections to the Northern Ireland Assembly are held. The Democratic Unionist Party loses ten seats, while Sinn Féin only loses one seat.[43]
  • 5 March – Tens of thousands of people including NHS employees, campaigners and union representatives march in London to protest against "yet more austerity" in the health service.[44]
  • 6 March – The British car manufacturer Vauxhall, along with its German sister firm, Opel, is sold by General Motors to Peugeot-Citroën of France as Groupe PSA agrees to a €2,200,000,000 (£1.9bn) deal to buy General Motors' European operations.[45]
  • 7 March – A chain of Budgens stores announces that it will close, after failing to find a buyer, with the loss of 800 jobs. The owner of the 34 stores affected – a third of Budgens outlets – was put in administration a month ago after hitting "difficult" trading conditions.[46]
  • 8 March
  • 9 March
  • 10 March BT bows to demands by the telecoms regulator Ofcom to legally separate Openreach, which runs the UK's broadband infrastructure.[50]
  • 14 March – The British Parliament passes the Brexit bill, paving the way for the UK Government to trigger Article 50; so that the UK can formally withdraw from the European Union.[51]
  • 15 March
    • The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors' head of UK policy says Brexit "has the potential to slowly bring the UK's £500bn infrastructure pipeline to a standstill", putting 200,000 construction jobs at risk if the United Kingdom loses access to the EU's single market.[52]
    • Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond is forced to make a U-turn on his commitment to raising National Insurance contributions for the self-employed after vast opposition from Conservative backbenchers.[53]
  • 16 March
    • The European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill is given Royal Assent by HM The Queen at 10:50, making it an Act of Parliament.
    • Theresa May formally rejects Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon's second Scottish Independence Referendum timetable for Autumn 2018, or at least before Brexit negotiations are concluded.
    • It is announced that the Japanese car manufacturer Toyota is to invest £240,000,000 in its UK operations at Burnaston near Derby.[54]
    • After White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer claims that President Obama used GCHQ to wiretap Donald Trump during his presidential campaign, the US Government issues an apology to the UK Government, assuring that the accusation will not be repeated.
  • 17 March – It is announced that the previous Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne, is to become the editor of the London Evening Standard; prompting extensive criticism.[55]
  • 20 March – The Government announces that it will invoke Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty on 29 March.[56]
  • 22 March – Four people die and at least forty others are injured in what is treated as a terrorist attack in London, when a male car driver, later identified as Khalid Masood, ploughs through pedestrians on Westminster Bridge before stabbing PC Keith Palmer to death at the Palace of Westminster. Police later shoot Masood dead. In response, the Houses of Parliament are placed in lockdown for four hours, as is the London Eye and Whitehall, and the devolved Scottish Parliament suspends a debate on a second Scottish independence referendum.[57][58]
  • 25 March – Thirty-three people are injured, including two seriously, and several buildings damaged, after a suspected gas explosion in Bebington, Merseyside.[59]
  • 28 March – The new twelve-sided £1 coin is released.[60]
  • 29 March – The United Kingdom invokes Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union, beginning the formal EU withdrawal process.[61][62]

April[edit]

May[edit]

  • 1 May – Mark Selby defeats John Higgins by 18 frames to 15 to win the 2017 World Snooker Championship.[77]
  • 4 May
  • 5 May – Paper £5 notes featuring Elizabeth Fry cease to be legal tender in the UK.[80]
  • 10 May – An eleven-year-old girl dies at Drayton Manor theme park after falling off one of the rides.[81]
  • 12 May – Computers across the United Kingdom are hit by a large-scale ransomware cyber-attack, causing major disruption.[82]
  • 15 May – Ian Brady, jailed for life more than 50 years ago for the Moors murders, dies at the age of 79 at Ashworth Hospital, Merseyside. Brady was Britain's longest-serving prisoner, and had been at Ashworth since 1985 after being transferred from a mainstream prison. His accomplice, Myra Hindley, died in November 2002; she too was never paroled. Unlike Hindley, who made several attempts to win parole, Brady never wanted to be released from custody and even lodged an unsuccessful legal challenge to be allowed to starve himself to death in 1999.[83]
  • 22 May – Manchester Arena is attacked by a suicide bomber following a music concert by American singer Ariana Grande, resulting in multiple casualties.[84] It is the most deadly attack in the UK since the 7 July 2005 London bombings and the first in the North of England since the IRA bombing of Manchester in June 1996.
  • 23 May
  • 24 May
    • The UK's terror threat level is raised from "severe" to "critical", its highest possible level, for the first time in ten years; meaning not only is an attack being highly likely, it is "expected imminently".[88]
    • As police investigate a "network" relating to the Manchester Arena attack, up to 5,000 military personnel are deployed onto the streets of Britain. Seven people are arrested, including the bomber's 23-year-old brother. The suicide bomber is confirmed to have been 22-year-old Salman Abedi, who lived in the city and was the son of Libyan immigrants.[89]
  • 25 May
    • Police investigating the Manchester bombing reveal they have stopped sharing information with the US, following leaks to the media.[90]
    • A nationwide minute's silence is held at 11:00 BST to remember the Manchester attack victims.[91]
    • The Queen visits Royal Manchester Children's Hospital to meet children injured in the attack at Manchester Arena and the staff caring for them. It is confirmed that more than 100 people were wounded by the blast. All of the 22 people who died have by now been identified.[92]
  • 27 May
  • 29 May – A female zookeeper is killed in what is described as a freak accident in the tiger enclosure of Hamerton Zoo Park, near Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire.[94]
  • 30 May – Manchester Victoria railway station is reopened more than a week after the suicide attack at the city's arena.[95]
  • 31 May – Breast surgeon Ian Paterson is jailed for fifteen years after carrying out unnecessary operations. Paterson, 59, carried out surgery on nine women and one man after falsely telling them they had breast cancer.[96]

June[edit]

  • 3 June – Seven people are reported killed and 48 injured in an attack by three Islamist extremists at London Bridge.[97] A hit-and-run vehicle on the bridge is followed by knife attacks at Borough Market. All three perpetrators are shot dead by police within eight minutes.[98]
  • 4 June
    • General election campaigning is suspended by most major political parties for a day following the previous evening's attack in London. Prime Minister Theresa May confirms the general election will go ahead as scheduled on 8 June.[99]
    • Twelve people are arrested in Barking, East London, in connection with the terror attack at London Bridge.[100]
    • The One Love Manchester concert is held at Old Trafford Cricket Ground to raise funds for the injured and bereaved in the Manchester Arena bombing, organised by Ariana Grande and also featuring artists and acts including Miley Cyrus, Robbie Williams, Katy Perry, Justin Bieber, Little Mix and The Black Eyed Peas. It is attended by some 50,000 people and watched on TV by more than 22 million viewers (the largest TV audience of the year to date).
  • 6 June – A nationwide minute's silence is held at 11:00 BST to remember the victims of the London attack.[101]
  • 7 June
    • Police searching for a French man, who had been missing since the London Bridge attack on 3 June, confirm his body has been recovered from the River Thames, raising the death toll to eight.[102]
    • The Labour Party announces that Diane Abbott is to take a break from her role as Shadow Home Secretary due to ill health. Shadow minister Lyn Brown will become Acting Shadow Home Secretary in Abbott's absence.[103]
    • Solar, wind and nuclear power each provide more electricity than gas and coal combined for the first time in the UK.[104]
  • 8 June – general election 2017: The Conservatives remain the largest party, but fail to get enough seats for a majority, leading to a hung parliament. In a surprise result, they are reduced from 330 to 318 seats. PM Theresa May rejects calls for her to resign and attempts to form a coalition with the DUP, which would give her 10 additional seats. Labour gain 32 seats, with particular success in London; the SNP suffers heavy losses with 21 fewer seats; the Liberal Democrats gain four seats for a total of 12; UKIP lose their sole seat and Paul Nuttall resigns as party leader.[105]
  • 9 June – Following a three-week trial at Warwick Crown Court, former BBC radio presenters Tony Wadsworth and Julie Mayer are convicted of indecently assaulting underage boys, and each are jailed for five years.[106]
  • 10 June
  • 11 June – The England national under-20 football team win the FIFA U-20 World Cup for the first time beating Venezuela by 1 goal to nil in the final.[109]
  • 14 June
  • 15 June – After both main party leaders visit the site, Theresa May orders a public inquiry into the Grenfell Tower fire.[112] As the death toll continues to rise, firefighters estimate that it will take "months" to identify all the victims. Police open a criminal investigation into the blaze.[113]
  • 16 June
  • 17 June – The Trooping the Colour parade takes place to celebrate The Queen's official birthday.[116]
  • 18 June – The Government announces that there will be no Queen's Speech in 2018, to give MPs more time to deal with Brexit laws.[117]
  • 19 June
    • 2017 Finsbury Park attack: One person is killed and ten others are injured after a van is deliberately rammed into pedestrians near Finsbury Park Mosque. 47-year-old Darren Osborne, who shouted that he wanted to "kill all Muslims", is arrested after members of the public subdue him.[118]
    • Brexit Secretary David Davis heads to Brussels as formal negotiations with the EU get underway.[119]
  • 21 June
    • As the heatwave continues, the UK experiences its hottest June day since 1976, with a temperature of 34.4C (94F) recorded at Heathrow Airport.[120]
    • Parliament is officially opened by the Queen.[121]
    • Muslim cousins were the victims of the 2017 Beckton acid attack. This is seen as part of the rising hatred against Muslims in Great Britain.[122]
  • 22 June – Nicholas Holgate, the chief executive of Kensington and Chelsea council, resigns amid criticism over the borough's response to the Grenfell Tower fire.[123]
  • 23 June – Five tower blocks with 800 homes in Camden, North London, are evacuated due to cladding concerns.[124]
  • 24 June – Police investigate a cyberattack on the Houses of Parliament after an attempt was made to gain unauthorised access to politicians' email accounts.[125]
  • 26 June – The Conservatives agree a £1 billion deal with Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party to support Theresa May's Conservative minority government.[126]
  • 27 June – Nicola Sturgeon announces that she will delay plans for a proposed second Scottish independence referendum.[127]
  • 28 June – It is reported that Hillsborough police chief David Duckenfield will be charged with the manslaughter of 95 people during the 1989 disaster. Five others face charges.[128]
  • 30 June – The leader of Kensington and Chelsea council, Nick Paget-Brown, resigns following criticism over the Grenfell Tower fire enquiry.[129]

July[edit]

  • 1 July – Thousands of people march in London in the "Not One Day More" protest against the government's economic policies.[130]
  • 3 July – French energy supplier EDF raises the estimated cost of completing the new Hinkley Point C nuclear plant from £18 billion to £19.6 billion.[131]
  • 9 July – The Lake District becomes an officially recognised UNESCO World Heritage Site.[132][133]
  • 10 July – MP Anne Marie Morris is suspended from the Conservative Party and has the whip withdrawn after using racist language during a public discussion on Brexit.[134][135]
  • 11 July
    • The government announces more than £100 million of investment in the UK's space sector.[136]
    • Organisers of the British Grand Prix invoke a break clause placing the future of the race meaning unless a new contract is signed, 2019 will be the final year the British Grand Prix takes place at Silverstone.[137]
  • 12 July – A gay man, John Walker, wins a landmark ruling at the Supreme Court, giving his husband the same pension rights as a wife would receive.[138]
  • 14 July – Two teenagers are arrested after five separate acid attacks within ninety minutes throughout London.[139]
  • 16 July
  • 18 July
    • A flash flood sweeps through Coverack in Cornwall.[140]
    • Gains in life expectancy in England are reported to have slowed to a halt, after more than 100 years of continuous progress.[141]
  • 19 July – The government announces that a rise in the State Pension age to 68 will be phased in between 2037 and 2039, rather than from 2044 as was originally planned. This will affect 6 million men and women currently aged between 39–47 years old.[142]
  • 20 July
    • The latest Brexit talks end without agreement on EU citizens' rights or the amount the UK should pay.[143]
    • Sir Vince Cable becomes the new leader of the Liberal Democrats after nominations close without any challengers.[144]
    • The Office for National Statistics reports that crime in England and Wales has seen its largest annual rise in a decade, increasing by 10% overall between April 2016 and March 2017, with violent crime up by 18%.[145]
  • 22 July –
    • The Government announces plans to introduce drone registration and safety awareness courses for owners of the small unmanned aircraft.[146]
    • The UK Independence Party loses overall control of Thanet District Council, the only local authority it runs, after one of its councillors defects to the Conservative Party.[147]
  • 26 July
    • The government announces that all new diesel and petrol cars and vans will be banned in the UK from 2040.[148]
    • The Supreme Court rules that employment tribunal fees are unlawful, meaning the government will have to repay up to £32m to claimants.[149]
  • 27 July – A High Court judge approves a plan for terminally-ill baby Charlie Gard to be moved to a hospice and have his life support withdrawn.[150]
  • 28 July – The parents of Charlie Gard confirm that he has died.[151]
  • 30 July – Organisiers cancel the Sunday leg of the Y Not Festival in Derbyshire after heavy rainfall throughout the weekend leads to excessive mud and adverse conditions on the festival site.[152]

August[edit]

  • 1 August
    • British Gas announces that it will increase electricity prices by 12.5% from 15 September, in a move affecting 3.1 million customers.[153]
    • McColls, the convenience shop chain, signs a new supply deal with Morrisons in a move that will resurrect the Safeway brand.[154]
  • 2 August
    • The Duke of Edinburgh carries out his final official engagement before retiring from public duties at age 96.[155]
    • A group of 70 Army cadets, many of them children, are rescued from the Mourne Mountains in Northern Ireland after being stranded due to bad weather.[156]
  • 4 August
  • 5 August
    • Major engineering works scheduled to continue until 28 August cause severe disruption at London Waterloo, the UK's busiest railway station, as platforms 1 to 10 are closed in an £800 million project to extend their length.[159]
    • The Foreign Office provides consular support to a British model who was drugged and kidnapped by Polish national Lukasz Herbain in Milan to be sold in an online auction.[160]
  • 10 August – A trade analysis by the Environmental Investigations Agency shows that the UK is the world's largest legal ivory exporter.[161]
  • 16 August
  • 17 August – Seven-year-old Julian Cadman, with dual British-Australian nationality, is one of 15 people killed in terrorist attacks in Barcelona and Cambrils in Spain.[164]
  • 21 August – The chimes of Big Ben fall silent as a four-year renovation of the building begins.[165]
  • 25 August – Three police officers received minor injuries outside Buckingham Palace whilst arresting a 26-year-old man under the Terrorism Act. The man had approached the police in a car and was brandishing a 4 ft sword and shouting "Allahu Akbar".[166]
  • 26 August –
  • 27 August – Over 230 people are treated in hospital for minor ailments following a suspected chemical leak at a beach at Birling Gap, East Sussex.[169][170]

September[edit]

  • 1 September –
    • Women are eligible to join the RAF Regiment, making the Royal Air Force the first of the British armed services to accept both genders in all roles.[171]
    • The death is reported at age 50 of Stephanie Slater, the Birmingham estate agent kidnapped and held captive by Michael Sams in 1992.[172]
  • 4 September
  • 9 September – Thousands of Remainers join a rally in central London to protest at the impact of the UK leaving the EU.[175]
  • 11 September – In a Commons vote, MPs back the EU Withdrawal Bill by 326 to 290, as critics warn it represents a "power grab" by ministers.[176]
  • 14 September – A new £10 polymer banknote is released, featuring Jane Austen.[177]
  • 15 September – A blast and fire on a tube train at Parsons Green station is treated as a terrorist attack. A number of people suffer burn injuries, while others are injured during the trample to escape. There are 29 injures in total, but no deaths and no reports of any life-threatening injuries.[178] The UK terror threat is raised to its highest level as police hunt the perpetrator, with hundreds of officers looking through CCTV footage.[179]
  • 16 September – Police arrest an 18-year-old man in Dover on suspicion of a terror offence in connection with the attack on a London Tube train the previous day.[180]
  • 20 September – UK scientists edit the DNA of human embryos for the first time.[181][182]
  • 22 September
    • Transport for London (TfL) announces that ride-hailing app Uber is "not fit and proper" to operate in London and will not have its licence renewed.[183][184]
    • Speaking in Florence, Theresa May proposes a two-year transition period after 2019 to fully implement Brexit, a deal which could include payments to the EU worth 20bn euros (about £18bn).[185]
    • The UK's credit rating is downgraded by Moody's, from Aa1 to Aa2.[186][187]
  • 27 September – Measles is declared eradicated in the UK for the first time.[188]
  • 28 September – An undercover investigation by the Guardian and ITV News finds that the largest supplier of chicken to UK supermarkets may have duped customers into buying out-of-date meat.[189]

October[edit]

  • 2 October – Monarch Airlines, the UK's fifth biggest airline, is placed into administration.[190]
  • 3 October – Following a spate of acid attacks, the government announces that sales of acids to under 18s will be banned.[191]
  • 4 October – Theresa May promises a "new generation of council housing" and an energy price cap, in a conference speech interrupted by a prankster.[192]
  • 7 October – A man is arrested after a car ploughs into pedestrians outside the Natural History Museum in South Kensington, London, injuring several people. The incident is caused by dangerous driving and is not terror-related.[193]
  • 12 October – During the latest round of Brexit negotiations between Britain and Europe, the EU's chief negotiator Michel Barnier tells a press conference that talks are in a "very disturbing state of deadlock".[194]
  • 15 October – Round £1 coins cease to be legal tender in the UK.[195]
  • 16 October
    • Revised figures from the ONS indicate that Britain is £490 billion poorer than previously thought, and that the country no longer has a net reserve of foreign assets.[196]
    • Hurricane Ophelia hits the British Isles.[197]
  • 17 October – The Consumer Price Index (CPI), the UK's key inflation rate, increases from 2.9 to 3%, its highest for more than five years, driven by a rise in transport and food prices.[198]
  • 22 October – A man is arrested after a four-hour armed siege in which two men were held hostage at a bowling alley in Nuneaton, Warwickshire.[199]
  • 26 October – Women in Scotland are to be allowed to take abortion pills at home, bringing the country into line with others such as Sweden and France.[200]
  • 28 October – The England national under-17 football team win the FIFA U-17 World Cup for the first time after beating Spain by 5 goals to 2 in the final.[201]
  • 29 October – Theresa May orders the Cabinet Office to investigate claims about the conduct of minister Mark Garnier, after the Mail on Sunday reports that he asked his secretary to buy sex toys for him and called her "sugar tits".[202]

November[edit]

  • 1 November
    • Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon resigns following allegations of inappropriate past behaviour.[203]
    • The Government loses an opposition vote calling on it to publish impact assessments of Brexit on more than 50 key industries.[204]
  • 2 November
  • 3 November – British police investigate an allegation of sexual assault made against Hollywood actor Kevin Spacey, while he was resident in London during 2008. This follows a string of other allegations against him in the United States.[207]
  • 5 November – A huge new leak of documents known as the Paradise Papers is reported by the BBC's Panorama programme, revealing how the wealthy and powerful, including the Queen's private estate, invest offshore.[208]
  • 7 November
    • Figures from the Office for National Statistics reveal that only in England are people happier following the Brexit vote.[209]
    • Carl Sargeant, 49, the Cabinet Secretary for Communities and Children in the Welsh Government, commits suicide at home, days after facing a party investigation into allegations of sexual impropriety.[210]
    • Nicola Sturgeon, Scotland's First Minister, apologises to gay men convicted of sexual offences that are no longer illegal as new legislation is introduced that will automatically pardon gay and bisexual men convicted under historical laws.[211]
  • 8 November – Priti Patel resigns as International Development Secretary amid controversy over unauthorised meetings she had with Israeli officials.[212]
  • 9 November – Penny Mordaunt replaces Priti Patel as International Development Secretary.[213]
  • 10 November – An escaped Eurasian lynx is shot dead in Ceredigion, Wales. The animal, named Lilleth, had escaped from Borth Wild Animal Kingdom.[214] A second lynx, named Nilly, dies three days later from a "handling error", prompting calls for the zoo to be shut down.[215]
  • 13 November – David Davis announces that Parliament will be given a vote on the final Brexit deal before the United Kingdom leaves the European Union in 2019.[216]
  • 14 November
    • Westminster's public accounts committee warns that failure to complete the introduction of a new customs system by Brexit in 2019 would be "catastrophic", with huge disruption for businesses and transport. The report further states that the number of customs declarations which HM Revenue and Customs would have to process each year could increase almost five-fold – from 55m to 225m – after leaving the EU.[217]
    • Researchers at the University of Edinburgh report that more than 400 Twitter accounts operating from the Russian Internet Research Agency (IRA) attempted to influence UK politics in the run-up to the Brexit referendum.[218]
  • 15 November – A report by the British Medical Journal shows that NHS and social care austerity has been responsible for 120,000 excess deaths since 2010 under the Tories.[219]
  • 16 November
    • The Metropolitan Police announces that 71 victims of the Grenfell Tower fire have been formally identified and that all those who died have been recovered.[220]
    • The Old Vic theatre says it has received 20 personal testimonies of alleged inappropriate behaviour by Kevin Spacey during his 11-year tenure as artistic director.[221]
  • 17 November – Sarah Clarke, current championship director of the All England Lawn Tennis Club, is appointed as the first female Black Rod. She will take up the position in January 2018, and have the title "The Lady Usher of the Black Rod".[222]
  • 18 November
  • 20 November
  • 21 November – The UK loses its seat on the International Court of Justice for the first time since the UN's principal legal body began in 1946.[228]
  • 22 November – The government's Autumn budget is published.[229]
  • 23 November – The European Commission states that UK participation in the European Capital of Culture will no longer be possible.[230]
  • 24 November – An altercation at Oxford Circus tube station creates mass panic during rush hour in central London.[231] Two men, aged 21 and 40, are later interviewed by detectives after voluntarily attending a police station following an appeal.[232]
  • 25 November
    • Former TV presenter John Leslie is charged with sexually assaulting a woman in an Edinburgh nightclub.[233]
    • Five people, including three children, are killed after a stolen car crashes into a tree in Leeds. Two 15-year-old boys are held in custody on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving.[234]
  • 26 November – Sailors of the Royal Navy perform the Changing of the Guard ceremony in London for the first time in its history.[235]
  • 27 November – Prince Harry announces his engagement to American actress Meghan Markle.[236][237]
  • 28 November – The House of Commons Speaker, John Bercow, orders Brexit secretary David Davis to face a Commons committee, after MPs say he ignored a binding vote to hand over full documents on the impact of Brexit on 58 sectors.[238]

December[edit]

  • 3 December – Alan Milburn and the entire Social Mobility Commission quit their roles, citing ‘lack of political leadership’, a repeated refusal to properly resource and staff the commission, an obsession with Brexit and an ‘absence’ of policy.[239][240]
  • 4 December
    • In Brussels, Theresa May and Jean-Claude Juncker fail to reach an agreement on key points needed to progress to the next stage of Brexit talks, including the issue of the Northern Ireland border.[241]
    • The retailer Toys "R" Us announces that it is to close 26 of its stores in Britain.[242]
  • 5 December – The Office of National Statistics values the UK at £9.8 trillion.[243]
  • 6 December – While being questioned by the Brexit committee, David Davis admits that the Government have not conducted a single economic impact assessment on the impact of Brexit to the economy.[244][245] Philip Hammond later states that the Cabinet "has not had specific discussion about the final Brexit outcome it wants."[246]
  • 7 December – Coventry is named the UK City of Culture 2021.[247]
  • 8 December – The United Kingdom and European Union reach agreement on the first stage of Brexit.[248]
  • 10–11 December – Heavy snowfall and strong winds bring widespread disruption to the UK.[249]
  • 11 December – Mount Hope in the British Antarctic Territory is found to be the highest mountain in British territory.[250]
  • 12 December – The UK's key inflation rate – the consumer prices index – rises to 3.1%, the highest level in nearly six years.[251]
  • 13 December – After a rebellion by Tory MPs, the government is defeated in a key vote on Brexit, with MPs voting in favour of giving Parliament a say on the final deal struck with the EU.[252]
  • 14 December – The Scottish government's budget proposes splitting the 20% income tax band into three with a new lower band of 19%, a 20% band, and a 21% band for those earning over £24,000.[253]
  • 15 December – 27 EU leaders vote to allow Brexit talks to move on to Phase 2 at an EU Summit.[254]
  • 16 December – The body of a 30-year old British woman, Rebecca Dykes, who worked at the British Embassy in Beirut, Lebanon, is found near a motorway on the outskirts of the city. A 35-year-old male Uber driver is arrested and charged with her rape and murder.[255]
  • 17 December – Six people are killed in a multiple-vehicle crash on Belgrave Middleway in Birmingham.[256]
  • 19 December – Four male suspects are arrested in South Yorkshire and Derbyshire over an alleged plot to carry out Islamist terror attacks in the UK over Christmas.[257]
  • 20 December
    • The EU announces that the UK's Brexit transition period will end no later than 31 December 2020.[258]
    • Damian Green, one of Theresa May's closest allies, resigns from the cabinet after an investigation finds he made "inaccurate and misleading" statements regarding pornography on a computer in his Commons office.[259]
  • 21 December – A 30-year-old woman, Jodie Willsher, is stabbed to death while working at an Aldi store in Skipton, North Yorkshire. A 44-year-old male suspect is arrested and charged with her murder.[260]
  • 29 December – Lord Adonis resigns from his role as the government's infrastructure adviser, in a letter criticising both Brexit and the role of the private sector in rail contracts.[261]
  • 31 December

Publications[edit]

Deaths[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "UK City of Culture: Fireworks and projections start Hull 2017". BBC News. 1 January 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2017. 
  2. ^ "Train fares rise by an average of 2.3%". BBC News. 2 January 2017. Retrieved 2 January 2017. 
  3. ^ Editorial, Reuters. "Britain to build 17 towns and villages to ease housing squeeze". Reuters UK. Retrieved 2 January 2017. 
  4. ^ "Man dies in Huddersfield police shooting". BBC News. 3 January 2017. Retrieved 3 January 2017. 
  5. ^ "UK ambassador to the EU Sir Ivan Rogers resigns". BBC News. 3 January 2017. Retrieved 3 January 2017. 
  6. ^ "Next warns on outlook as sales fall". BBC News. 4 January 2017. Retrieved 4 January 2017. 
  7. ^ "Sir Tim Barrow appointed as UK's new ambassador to EU". BBC News. 4 January 2017. Retrieved 4 January 2017. 
  8. ^ "UK car sales at record high in 2016". BBC News. 5 January 2017. Retrieved 5 January 2017. 
  9. ^ "Changing the Guard switches to fixed days amid tightened security". BBC News. 5 January 2017. Retrieved 5 January 2017. 
  10. ^ "Jamie Oliver closes six Jamie's Italian UK restaurants". BBC News. 6 January 2017. Retrieved 6 January 2017. 
  11. ^ "'Humanitarian crisis' in NHS hospitals, warns Red Cross". BBC News. 7 January 2017. Retrieved 7 January 2017. 
  12. ^ "Diplomat conspiring to smear Deputy Foreign Secretary". Daily Mail. Retrieved 9 January 2017. 
  13. ^ Milligan, Brian (8 January 2017). "UK household debt now a record £13,000, says TUC". BBC News. Retrieved 9 January 2017. 
  14. ^ "Tube strike: London travellers hit by crowding". BBC News. 9 January 2017. Retrieved 9 January 2017. 
  15. ^ "Martin McGuinness resigns as NI deputy first minister". BBC News. 9 January 2017. Retrieved 9 January 2017. 
  16. ^ "NHS conditions worst ever, say leading nurses". BBC News. 11 January 2017. Retrieved 11 January 2017. 
  17. ^ "Stonehenge tunnel plan finalised by government". BBC News. 12 January 2017. Retrieved 12 January 2017. 
  18. ^ "Tidal lagoon: £1.3bn Swansea Bay project backed by review". BBC News. 12 January 2017. Retrieved 12 January 2017. 
  19. ^ "Labour's Tristram Hunt quitting as MP to head V&A museum". BBC News. 13 January 2017. Retrieved 13 January 2017. 
  20. ^ "Pound falls ahead of Theresa May Brexit speech". BBC News. 16 January 2017. Retrieved 16 January 2017. 
  21. ^ "Power-sharing collapses in Northern Ireland, after Sinn Fein refuse to return to Stormont executive". The Independent. 16 January 2017. Retrieved 16 January 2017. 
  22. ^ "Brexit: UK to leave single market, says Theresa May". BBC News. 17 January 2017. Retrieved 17 January 2017. 
  23. ^ "Freshfields and Quinn Emanuel advise as landmark £14bn UK class action enters court". Legal Week. 18 January 2017. Retrieved 22 January 2017. 
  24. ^ "First British holidaymakers return from the Gambia". BBC News. 19 January 2017. Retrieved 19 January 2017. 
  25. ^ "Thousands protest in London at Women's March against Donald Trump". The Independent. 21 January 2017. Retrieved 22 January 2017. 
  26. ^ "Government loses Brexit vote appeal". BBC News. 24 January 2017. Retrieved 24 January 2017. 
  27. ^ "Trump executive order: Million sign petition to stop UK visit". BBC News. 30 January 2017. Retrieved 30 January 2017. 
  28. ^ "Brexit plan published in government White Paper". BBC News. 1 February 2017. Retrieved 1 February 2017. 
  29. ^ "Housing market broken, ministers say ahead of White Paper". BBC News. 7 February 2017. Retrieved 7 February 2017. 
  30. ^ Heather Stewart; Anushka Asthana (8 February 2017). "Clive Lewis quits shadow cabinet over Brexit bill". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 10 February 2017. 
  31. ^ "Air pollution 'final warning' from European Commission to UK". BBC News. 15 February 2017. Retrieved 15 February 2017. 
  32. ^ "Gorden Kaye: Funeral of 'Allo 'Allo! star held in Huddersfield". BBC News. 17 February 2017. Retrieved 17 February 2017. 
  33. ^ "Tony Blair calls for people to 'rise up' against Brexit". BBC News. 17 February 2017. Retrieved 18 February 2017. 
  34. ^ "Blair Urges Brexit Opponents to Rise Up (Full Speech)". 17 February 2017. Retrieved 18 February 2017 – via YouTube. 
  35. ^ "Burnley 0–1 Lincoln City". BBC News. 18 February 2017. Retrieved 18 February 2017. 
  36. ^ "Trump state visit: Protests as MPs debate petition". BBC News. 21 February 2017. Retrieved 21 February 2017. 
  37. ^ "Heterosexual couple lose civil partnership challenge". BBC News. 21 February 2017. Retrieved 21 February 2017. 
  38. ^ "Helen Bailey murder: Fiance Ian Stewart found guilty". BBC News. 22 February 2017. Retrieved 22 February 2017. 
  39. ^ "Cressida Dick appointed as first female Metropolitan Police chief". BBC News. Retrieved 22 February 2017. 
  40. ^ "Tories win Copeland by-election as Labour holds Stoke". BBC News. Retrieved 24 February 2017. 
  41. ^ "Storm Doris: Woman killed as UK hit by winds reaching 94mph". BBC News. 23 February 2017. Retrieved 23 February 2017. 
  42. ^ Dugan, Emily (25 August 2017). "This Grandmother Is Still Waiting To Hear If She Can Get Back into Britain Six Months After She Was Deported". BuzzFeed. Retrieved 30 August 2017. 
  43. ^ "Assembly election: Sinn Féin hails 'watershed' result". BBC News. 4 March 2017. Retrieved 5 March 2017. 
  44. ^ "NHS protest: Tens of thousands march against 'hospital cuts'". BBC News. 4 March 2017. Retrieved 6 March 2017. 
  45. ^ "Vauxhall-Opel sold by GM to Peugeot-Citroen". BBC News. 6 March 2017. Retrieved 6 March 2017. 
  46. ^ "Budgens: More than 800 jobs lost as 34 stores close". BBC News. 7 March 2017. Retrieved 7 March 2017. 
  47. ^ "Budget 2017: £2 billion for social care and tax rise for self-employed". BBC News. Retrieved 8 March 2017. 
  48. ^ Monaghan, Angela (9 March 2017). "UK in worst decade for pay growth for 210 years, says thinktank | Business". The Guardian. Retrieved 9 March 2017. 
  49. ^ "Bishop Philip North steps down over women priests row". BBC News. 9 March 2017. Retrieved 9 March 2017. 
  50. ^ "BT Openreach deal aims to shake up UK broadband". BBC News. 10 March 2017. Retrieved 14 March 2017. 
  51. ^ "Brexit bill: Parliament clears way for talks with EU". BBC News. 14 March 2017. Retrieved 14 March 2017. 
  52. ^ Cox, Josie (15 March 2017). "Brexit: 200,000 construction jobs at risk if UK loses EU single market access". The Independent. Retrieved 15 March 2017. 
  53. ^ Crace, John (15 March 2017). "Philip Hammond digs deep as he explains his NICS U-turn". The Guardian. Retrieved 20 March 2017. 
  54. ^ "Toyota to invest £240m in UK plant at Burnaston". BBC News. 16 March 2017. Retrieved 16 March 2017. 
  55. ^ "George Osborne to become editor of London Evening Standard". BBC News. 17 March 2017. Retrieved 20 March 2017. 
  56. ^ "Article 50: Theresa May to trigger Brexit process next week". BBC News. 20 March 2017. Retrieved 20 March 2017. 
  57. ^ "Westminster attack – latest updates". BBC News. 22 March 2017. Retrieved 22 March 2017. 
  58. ^ "London attack: Khalid Masood – what we know about the attacker". BBC News. 23 March 2017. Retrieved 24 March 2017. 
  59. ^ "Dozens injured in Wirral explosion". BBC News. 26 March 2017. Retrieved 26 March 2017. 
  60. ^ "New £1 coin's 'hidden' security feature". BBC News. 28 March 2017. Retrieved 28 March 2017. 
  61. ^ "'No turning back' on Brexit as Article 50 triggered". BBC News. 29 March 2017. Retrieved 29 March 2017. 
  62. ^ "Brexit begins: UK triggers Article 50 to begin EU divorce". CNN. 29 March 2017. Retrieved 29 March 2017. 
  63. ^ "London attack: Families attend Westminster service". BBC News. 5 April 2017. Retrieved 5 April 2017. 
  64. ^ "Andreea Cristea: woman who fell in the Thames during the Westminster attack dies in hospital". The Daily Telegraph. 7 April 2017. Retrieved 10 April 2017. 
  65. ^ "Stockholm attack: Chris Bevington named as British victim". BBC News. 9 April 2017. Retrieved 9 April 2017. 
  66. ^ "Libor: Bank of England implicated in secret recording". BBC News. 10 April 2017. Retrieved 10 April 2017. 
  67. ^ "PC Keith Palmer: Funeral for officer killed in London attacks". BBC News. 10 April 2017. Retrieved 10 April 2017. 
  68. ^ "Hackney nightclub acid attack leaves at least 12 injured". BBC News. 17 April 2017. Retrieved 17 April 2017. 
  69. ^ "May to seek snap election for 8 June". BBC News. Retrieved 18 April 2017. 
  70. ^ "General election campaigning begins as MPs back June poll". BBC News. 18 April 2017. Retrieved 18 April 2017. 
  71. ^ "First coal-free day in Britain since Industrial Revolution". BBC News. 22 April 2017. Retrieved 22 April 2017. 
  72. ^ "Arthur Collins charged over London nightclub 'acid attack'". BBC News. 24 April 2017. Retrieved 24 April 2017. 
  73. ^ "Terror arrest near Houses of Parliament". BBC News. 27 April 2017. Retrieved 28 April 2017. 
  74. ^ "Willesden shooting: Police foil 'active terror plot'". BBC News. 28 April 2017. Retrieved 28 April 2017. 
  75. ^ "Garden Bridge: London mayor Sadiq Khan withdraws support". BBC News. 28 April 2017. Retrieved 28 April 2017. 
  76. ^ Reddy, Luke (29 April 2017). "Anthony Joshua stops Wladimir Klitschko in the 11th round at Wembley". BBC Sport. Retrieved 30 April 2017. 
  77. ^ Hafez, Shamoon (1 May 2017). "Mark Selby beats John Higgins to defend his World Championship title". BBC Sport. Retrieved 1 May 2017. 
  78. ^ "Prince Philip to step down from carrying out royal engagements". BBC News. 4 May 2017. Retrieved 4 May 2017. 
  79. ^ "General election 2017: Theresa May 'not taking victory for granted'". BBC News. 6 May 2017. Retrieved 6 May 2017. 
  80. ^ Peachey, Kevin (4 May 2017). "£5 note: Deadline looms for digging out old paper fivers". BBC News. Retrieved 6 May 2017. 
  81. ^ "Girl, 11, dies after Drayton Manor theme park fall". BBC News. 9 May 2017. Retrieved 15 May 2017. 
  82. ^ "NHS cyber-attack: GPs and hospitals hit by ransomware". BBC News. 12 May 2017. Retrieved 15 May 2017. 
  83. ^ "Moors Murderer Ian Brady dies". BBC News. 15 May 2017. Retrieved 15 May 2017. 
  84. ^ "Manchester Arena blast: 19 dead and more than 50 hurt". BBC News. 23 May 2017. Retrieved 7 June 2017. 
  85. ^ "Theresa May's Downing Street statement on Manchester terror attack in full". Jack Maidment. 23 May 2017. Retrieved 26 May 2017. 
  86. ^ "What is a Cobra meeting? Theresa May to hold emergency security briefing in wake of Manchester terror attack". Scarlet Howes. 23 May 2017. Retrieved 26 May 2017. 
  87. ^ "Isil claims responsibility for Manchester attack". Josie Ensor. 23 May 2017. Retrieved 26 May 2017. 
  88. ^ "Soldiers deployed on streets in race to foil second terror attack after threat level raised to 'critical'". The Telegraph. 24 May 2017. Retrieved 26 May 2017. 
  89. ^ "Manchester attack: Police hunt 'network' behind bomber". BBC News. 24 May 2017. Retrieved 24 May 2017. 
  90. ^ "Manchester attack: Police 'not sharing information with US'". BBC News. 25 May 2017. Retrieved 25 May 2017. 
  91. ^ "Manchester attack: National minute's silence held". BBC News. 25 May 2017. Retrieved 25 May 2017. 
  92. ^ "The Queen has visited Royal Manchester Children's Hospital". BBC News. 25 May 2017. Retrieved 25 May 2017. 
  93. ^ "British Airways: All flights cancelled amid IT crash". BBC News. 27 May 2017. Retrieved 27 May 2017. 
  94. ^ "Hamerton Zookeeper dies in 'freak tiger accident'". BBC News. 29 May 2017. Retrieved 7 June 2017. 
  95. ^ "Manchester attack: Victoria railway station reopens". BBC News. 30 May 2017. Retrieved 7 June 2017. 
  96. ^ "Disgraced surgeon Ian Paterson jailed for 15 years". BBC News. 31 May 2017. Retrieved 7 June 2017. 
  97. ^ "'Van hits pedestrians' on London Bridge in 'major incident'". BBC. 3 June 2017. Retrieved 3 June 2017. 
  98. ^ "London attack: Theresa May says enough is enough after seven die". BBC. 4 June 2017. Retrieved 4 June 2017. 
  99. ^ "London attack: General election will go ahead on 8 June, says May". BBC News. 4 June 2017. Retrieved 4 June 2017. 
  100. ^ "London attack: 12 arrested in Barking after van and knife attack". BBC. 4 June 2017. Retrieved 4 June 2017. 
  101. ^ Farmer, Ben (5 June 2017). "Londoners to hold vigil on Monday evening and minute's silence on Tuesday to honour victims". The Telegraph. 
  102. ^ "London attack: Seven of eight victims identified". BBC News. 7 June 2017. Retrieved 7 June 2017. 
  103. ^ "Diane Abbott: I will rejoin the fray soon". BBC News. 7 June 2017. Retrieved 7 June 2017. 
  104. ^ "Solar, wind and nuclear power each provide more electricity than gas and coal combined for first time". The Independent. 8 June 2017. Retrieved 8 June 2017. 
  105. ^ "Results of the 2017 General Election". BBC News. 9 June 2017. Retrieved 9 June 2017. 
  106. ^ "Ex-BBC presenters Tony and Julie Wadsworth jailed for sex offences". BBC News. 9 June 2017. Retrieved 9 June 2017. 
  107. ^ "Nick Timothy and Fiona Hill quit No 10 after election criticism". BBC News. 10 June 2017. Retrieved 10 June 2017. 
  108. ^ "General election 2017: Tories and DUP 'still in discussions'". BBC News. 11 June 2017. 
  109. ^ "England Under-20 World Cup win: What next for the players?". BBC Sport. 12 June 2017. 
  110. ^ "London fire: Flames engulf tower block". BBC News. 14 June 2017. Retrieved 14 June 2017. 
  111. ^ "Tim Farron quits as Lib Dem leader". BBC. 14 June 2017. Retrieved 14 June 2017. 
  112. ^ "London fire: Prime minister orders full public inquiry". BBC. 15 June 2017. Retrieved 15 June 2017. 
  113. ^ "Grenfell Tower fire: Police open criminal investigation into blaze that killed 17 as fears grow death toll could reach 100". The Independent. 15 June 2017. Retrieved 15 June 2017. 
  114. ^ "London fire: Protests grow as fire anger increases". BBC. 16 June 2017. Retrieved 16 June 2017. 
  115. ^ "Queen honours Westminster attack PC Keith Palmer for bravery". BBC News. 16 June 2017. 
  116. ^ Furness, Hannah (17 June 2017). "Royals join Trooping the Colour parade to celebrate The Queen's birthday". The Telegraph. 
  117. ^ "Brexit: 2018 Queen's Speech cancelled by government". BBC News. 18 June 2017. Retrieved 18 June 2017. 
  118. ^ "Finsbury Park attack: Man dies as van hits worshippers". BBC News. 19 June 2017. Retrieved 19 June 2017. 
  119. ^ "Brexit negotiations begin: David Davis targets 'historic' deal". BBC News. 19 June 2017. Retrieved 19 June 2017. 
  120. ^ "Hottest June day since summer of 1976 in heatwave". BBC News. 21 June 2017. Retrieved 21 June 2017. 
  121. ^ "Queen's Speech to take place next week". BBC News. 15 June 2017. 
  122. ^ "Beckton acid attack suspect in custody after handing himself in". The Guardian. Retrieved 14 July 2017. 
  123. ^ "London fire: Kensington council boss quits over Grenfell tragedy". BBC News. 22 June 2017. Retrieved 22 June 2017. 
  124. ^ "Camden flats: hundreds of homes evacuated over fire risk fears". BBC News. 23 June 2017. Retrieved 23 June 2017. 
  125. ^ "Parliament hit by 'sustained' cyber-attack – BBC News". BBC. Retrieved 26 June 2017. 
  126. ^ "Conservatives agree pact with DUP to support May government". BBC News. 26 June 2017. Retrieved 26 June 2017. 
  127. ^ "Nicola Sturgeon to 'reset' independence referendum plan". BBC News. 27 June 2017. Retrieved 27 June 2017. 
  128. ^ "Ex-Ch Supt David Duckenfield faces Hillsborough manslaughter charge". BBC News. 28 June 2017. Retrieved 28 June 2017. 
  129. ^ "Kensington and Chelsea council leader Nicholas Paget-Brown steps down amid Grenfell fire criticism". London Evening Standard. 30 June 2017. Retrieved 1 July 2017. 
  130. ^ "Thousands march on Parliament in anti-government protest". BBC News. 1 July 2017. Retrieved 1 July 2017. 
  131. ^ "Hinkley Point: EDF raises cost estimate for nuclear plant". BBC News. 3 July 2017. Retrieved 3 July 2017. 
  132. ^ "English Lake District welcomed into UK UNESCO family as 31st UK World Heritage Site". unesco.org.uk. 9 July 2017. Retrieved 9 July 2017. 
  133. ^ "Lake District becomes a World Heritage Site". Cumbria Crack. 9 July 2017. Retrieved 9 July 2017. 
  134. ^ "Tory Brexiteer describes UK leaving EU without deal as 'real n***** in the woodpile'". The Independent. 10 July 2017. Retrieved 10 July 2017. 
  135. ^ "Theresa May orders Tory MP to be suspended after using N-word". The Guardian. 10 July 2017. Retrieved 10 July 2017. 
  136. ^ "Big cash boost for UK satellite sector". BBC News. 11 July 2017. Retrieved 12 July 2017. 
  137. ^ "British Grand Prix future uncertain beyond 2019 as Silverstone activates break clause". BBC. 11 July 2017. Retrieved 13 July 2017. 
  138. ^ "Gay man wins Supreme Court case on equal pension rights". BBC News. 12 July 2017. Retrieved 12 July 2017. 
  139. ^ "London acid attacks: Teenager arrested". BBC News. 14 July 2017. Retrieved 14 July 2017. 
  140. ^ "Flash flood sweeps through Coverack in Cornwall". BBC News. 18 July 2017. Retrieved 18 July 2017. 
  141. ^ "Life expectancy rises 'grinding to halt' in England". BBC News. 18 July 2017. Retrieved 20 July 2017. 
  142. ^ "State pension age rise brought forward". BBC News. 19 July 2017. Retrieved 19 July 2017. 
  143. ^ "Brexit: UK and EU at odds over 'exit bill'". BBC News. 20 July 2017. Retrieved 20 July 2017. 
  144. ^ "Vince Cable is new Lib Dem leader". BBC News. 20 July 2017. Retrieved 20 July 2017. 
  145. ^ "Largest crime rise in England and Wales for 10 years". BBC News. 20 July 2017. Retrieved 20 July 2017. 
  146. ^ "UK to bring in drone registration". BBC News. 22 July 2017. Retrieved 22 July 2017. 
  147. ^ "Beverly Martin defection: UKIP loses control of its only council". BBC News. 22 July 2017. Retrieved 28 July 2017. 
  148. ^ "New diesel and petrol vehicles to be banned from 2040 in UK". BBC News. 26 July 2017. Retrieved 26 July 2017. 
  149. ^ "Employment tribunal fees unlawful, Supreme Court rules". BBC News. 26 July 2017. Retrieved 26 July 2017. 
  150. ^ "Charlie Gard hospice move approved". BBC News. 27 July 2017. Retrieved 27 July 2017. 
  151. ^ "Charlie Gard has died, his parents say". The Guardian. 28 July 2017. Retrieved 28 July 2017. 
  152. ^ "Festival cancelled over mud safety fears". BBC. 30 July 2017. Retrieved 22 October 2017. 
  153. ^ "British Gas to raise electricity prices". BBC News. 1 August 2017. Retrieved 22 October 2017. 
  154. ^ Armstrong, Ashley (1 August 2017). "Morrisons brings back Safeway in McColls wholesale deal". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 22 October 2017. 
  155. ^ "Prince Philip carries out final official engagement". BBC News. 2 August 2017. Retrieved 2 August 2017. 
  156. ^ "Mourne Mountains: Ambulances in Army cadets rescue". BBC News. 2 August 2017. Retrieved 4 August 2017. 
  157. ^ "Alligator found at Chew Valley Lake". BBC News. Retrieved 22 October 2017. 
  158. ^ "IAAF World Championships – Official website". iaafworldchampionships.com. Retrieved 22 October 2017. 
  159. ^ "Waterloo Station:£800m revamp begins with signal failure". BBC News. 5 August 2017. 
  160. ^ "British model kidnapped in Milan 'to be sold in online auction'". BBC News. 5 August 2017. 
  161. ^ "UK named as world's largest legal ivory exporter". The Guardian. 10 August 2017. Retrieved 10 August 2017. 
  162. ^ "Brexit: UK position paper opposes Irish border posts". BBC News. 16 August 2017. Retrieved 16 August 2017. 
  163. ^ "New aircraft carrier arrives in home port". BBC News. 16 August 2017. Retrieved 16 August 2017. 
  164. ^ "British boy among Barcelona attack dead". BBC. 20 August 2017. Retrieved 22 October 2017. 
  165. ^ "Big Ben bongs sound for final time for four years". The Guardian. 21 August 2017. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  166. ^ "Second arrest over palace 'terror incident'". BBC News. 27 August 2017. Retrieved 27 August 2017. 
  167. ^ "Eight dead in M1 minibus and lorry crash". BBC News. 26 August 2017. Retrieved 26 August 2017. 
  168. ^ "JK Rowling congratulates Quidditch champs". BBC News. 28 August 2017. Retrieved 22 October 2017. 
  169. ^ Roberts, Rachel (28 August 2017). "Police investigate suspected 'chemical incident' at Beachy Head after 50 people complain of stinging eyes and throats". The Independent. Independent Print Limited. Retrieved 28 August 2017. 
  170. ^ "Birling Gap beach: 150 treated after chemical 'mist'". BBC News. 28 August 2017. Retrieved 28 August 2017. 
  171. ^ "RAF's close combat unit opens to women for the first time". BBC News. 1 September 2017. Retrieved 1 September 2017. 
  172. ^ "Stephanie Slater: Michael Sams kidnap victim dies aged 50". BBC. 1 September 2017. 
  173. ^ "Royal baby: Duchess of Cambridge expecting third child". BBC. 4 September 2017. 
  174. ^ "More than half in UK are non-religious, suggests survey". BBC News. 4 September 2017. Retrieved 4 September 2017. 
  175. ^ "Anti-Brexit marchers rally in Parliament Square". BBC News. 9 September 2017. Retrieved 9 September 2017. 
  176. ^ "Brexit: EU repeal bill wins first Commons vote". BBC News. 12 September 2017. Retrieved 12 September 2017. 
  177. ^ "Jane Austen polymer £10 note enters circulation". BBC News. 14 September 2017. Retrieved 15 September 2017. 
  178. ^ "Parsons Green: London Tube blast treated as terror incident". BBC News. 15 September 2017. Retrieved 15 September 2017. 
  179. ^ "Parsons Green: Police hunt bomber behind Tube attack". BBC News. 16 September 2017. Retrieved 16 September 2017. 
  180. ^ "Parsons Green: Man arrested over Tube bombing". BBC News. 16 September 2017. Retrieved 16 September 2017. 
  181. ^ "UK scientists edit DNA of human embryos". BBC News. 20 September 2017. Retrieved 21 September 2017. 
  182. ^ "Genome editing reveals role of gene important for human embryo development". Francis Crick Institute. 20 September 2017. Retrieved 21 September 2017. 
  183. ^ "Uber London licence not renewed". BBC News. 22 September 2017. Retrieved 22 September 2017. 
  184. ^ "Licensing decision on Uber London Limited". Transport for London. 22 September 2017. Retrieved 22 September 2017. 
  185. ^ "Brexit: Theresa May sets out UK offer to break deadlock". BBC News. 22 September 2017. Retrieved 22 September 2017. 
  186. ^ "UK credit rating downgraded over Brexit uncertainty". Financial Times. 22 September 2017. Retrieved 28 September 2017. 
  187. ^ "UK credit rating downgraded by Moody's". BBC News. 23 September 2017. Retrieved 28 September 2017. 
  188. ^ "Measles eliminated in the UK for the first time". The Telegraph. 27 September 2017. Retrieved 27 September 2017. 
  189. ^ "UK's top supplier of supermarket chicken fiddles food safety dates". The Guardian. 28 September 2017. Retrieved 29 September 2017. 
  190. ^ "Monarch flights cancelled as airline ceases trading". BBC News. 2 October 2017. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  191. ^ "Sale of acids to under-18s to be banned, Amber Rudd says". BBC News. 3 October 2017. Retrieved 3 October 2017. 
  192. ^ "Theresa May speech to Conservative Party conference". BBC News. 4 October 2017. Retrieved 4 October 2017. 
  193. ^ "Natural History Museum crash: man arrested after car hits pedestrians". The Guardian. 7 October 2017. Retrieved 7 October 2017. 
  194. ^ "Brexit talks at 'disturbing deadlock' over divorce bill, says EU negotiator". The Guardian. 12 October 2017. Retrieved 12 October 2017. 
  195. ^ "New 12-sided pound coin to enter circulation in March". BBC News. 1 January 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2017. 
  196. ^ "Britain is £490bn poorer than thought, reveals ONS". The Independent. 16 October 2017. Retrieved 16 October 2017. 
  197. ^ "Hurricane Ophelia: Two people die as storm hits Ireland". BBC News. 16 October 2017. Retrieved 16 October 2017. 
  198. ^ "UK inflation at highest since April 2012". BBC News. 17 October 2017. Retrieved 17 October 2017. 
  199. ^ "Police end Nuneaton bowling alley siege". BBC News. 22 October 2017. Retrieved 22 October 2017. 
  200. ^ "Women in Scotland allowed abortion pill at home". BBC News. 26 October 2017. Retrieved 31 December 2017. 
  201. ^ Edwards, Richard (28 October 2017). "England U17 5-2 Spain U17: Young Lions win Under 17 World Cup after thrilling fightback in India". Mirror. 
  202. ^ "Claims about minister Mark Garnier's conduct to be investigated". BBC News. 29 October 2017. Retrieved 29 October 2017. 
  203. ^ "Sir Michael Fallon resigns over behaviour claims". BBC News. 1 November 2017. Retrieved 1 November 2017. 
  204. ^ "Government loses vote on publishing Brexit impact assessments". Sky News. 1 November 2017. Retrieved 1 November 2017. 
  205. ^ Stewart, Heather (2 November 2017). "Gavin Williamson replaces Michael Fallon as defence secretary". The Guardian. 
  206. ^ "First UK interest rate rise in 10 years". BBC News. 2 November 2017. Retrieved 2 November 2017. 
  207. ^ "Kevin Spacey: British police investigate sexual assault claims". The Guardian. 3 November 2017. Retrieved 3 November 2017. 
  208. ^ "Paradise Papers: Tax haven secrets of ultra-rich exposed". BBC News. 5 November 2017. Retrieved 5 November 2017. 
  209. ^ "Are we happier after the Brexit vote? Only in England, official figures claim". The Guardian. 7 November 2017. Retrieved 7 November 2017. 
  210. ^ "Sacked Labour minister Carl Sargeant found dead". BBC News. 7 November 2017. Retrieved 7 November 2017. 
  211. ^ "Nicola Sturgeon makes gay convictions apology". BBC News. 7 November 2017. 
  212. ^ "Priti Patel quits over Israel meetings row". BBC News. 8 November 2017. Retrieved 8 November 2017. 
  213. ^ "Penny Mordaunt replaces Priti Patel in cabinet reshuffle". BBC News. 9 November 2017. 
  214. ^ "Borth Wild Animal Kingdom 'outraged' over lynx killing". BBC News. 10 November 2017. Retrieved 11 November 2017. 
  215. ^ "Second lynx at Borth Wild Animal Kingdom dies". BBC News. 13 November 2017. Retrieved 13 November 2017. 
  216. ^ "Parliament to get binding vote on final Brexit deal". BBC News. 13 November 2017. Retrieved 13 November 2017. 
  217. ^ "Brexit: Failure to introduce new customs system by date of Britain's EU withdrawal would be 'catastrophic'". The Independent. 14 November 2017. Retrieved 14 November 2017. 
  218. ^ "Russia used hundreds of fake accounts to tweet about Brexit, data shows". The Guardian. 14 November 2017. Retrieved 15 November 2017. 
  219. ^ "Health and social care spending cuts linked to 120,000 excess deaths in England". BMJ. 15 November 2017. Retrieved 16 November 2017. 
  220. ^ "Grenfell Tower final death toll stands at 71". BBC News. 16 November 2017. Retrieved 16 November 2017. 
  221. ^ "Kevin Spacey: Old Vic has 20 personal testimonies against him". BBC News. 16 November 2017. Retrieved 16 November 2017. 
  222. ^ "Sarah Clarke is first female Black Rod in 650 years". BBC News. 17 November 2017. 
  223. ^ "Gaia Pope: Body found near Swanage in search for missing woman". BBC News. 19 November 2017. Retrieved 19 November 2017. 
  224. ^ "Richard Leonard to lead Scottish Labour". BBC News. 18 November 2017. Retrieved 18 November 2017. 
  225. ^ "Adams to stand down as Sinn Féin leader". BBC News. 18 November 2017. Retrieved 18 November 2017. 
  226. ^ Culbertson, Alix. "The Queen and Prince Philip: 70 years of Royal marriage". Sky News. 
  227. ^ "London loses EU agencies to Paris and Amsterdam in Brexit relocation". The Guardian. 20 November 2017. Retrieved 21 November 2017. 
  228. ^ "How UK lost International Court of Justice place to India". BBC News. 21 November 2017. Retrieved 21 November 2017. 
  229. ^ "Autumn Budget 2017". Government of the United Kingdom. 22 November 2017. Retrieved 24 November 2017. 
  230. ^ "Brexit scuppers UK's 2023 European Capital of Culture bids". BBC News. 23 November 2017. Retrieved 23 November 2017. 
  231. ^ "Oxford Circus tube incident: As it happened". BBC News. 24 November 2017. Retrieved 25 November 2017. 
  232. ^ "Oxford Circus: Two men quizzed after Tube panic". BBC News. 25 November 2017. Retrieved 25 November 2017. 
  233. ^ "Former TV presenter John Leslie charged with sexual assault". BBC News. 25 November 2017. Retrieved 25 November 2017. 
  234. ^ "Five killed as stolen car crashes into tree in Leeds". BBC News. 26 November 2017. Retrieved 26 November 2017. 
  235. ^ "Sailors perform Changing of the Guard in historic first". BBC News. 26 November 2017. Retrieved 26 November 2017. 
  236. ^ Elbaum, Rachel (27 November 2017). "Prince Harry 'thrilled' to marry girlfriend Meghan Markle next year". NBC News. 
  237. ^ "Prince Harry 'thrilled' to marry girlfriend Meghan Markle next year". BBC News. BBC. 27 November 2017. 
  238. ^ "David Davis at risk of contempt over Brexit reports, says Speaker". The Guardian. 28 November 2017. Retrieved 28 November 2017. 
  239. ^ "Theresa May faces new crisis after mass walkout over social policy". The Guardian. 3 December 2017. Retrieved 3 December 2017. 
  240. ^ "Social mobility board quits over lack of progress". BBC News. 3 December 2017. Retrieved 3 December 2017. 
  241. ^ "UK and EU fail to strike Brexit talks deal". BBC News. 4 December 2017. Retrieved 4 December 2017. 
  242. ^ "Toys R Us to shut 'at least' 26 UK stores". BBC News. 4 December 2017. Retrieved 5 December 2017. 
  243. ^ Isaac, Anna (5 December 2017). "Our green and expensive land: why the UK's £10 trillion price-tag adds to its housing problem". Retrieved 11 December 2017 – via www.telegraph.co.uk. 
  244. ^ "Impact assessments of Brexit on the UK 'don't exist'". BBC News. 6 December 2017. Retrieved 6 December 2017. 
  245. ^ "David Davis says government has not assessed impact of Brexit for different sections of economy – Politics live". The Guardian. 6 December 2017. Retrieved 6 December 2017. 
  246. ^ "Hammond says cabinet has not had specific discussion about final Brexit outcome it wants – Politics live". The Guardian. 6 December 2017. Retrieved 6 December 2017. 
  247. ^ "Coventry named UK City of Culture 2021". BBC News. 7 December 2017. Retrieved 7 December 2017. 
  248. ^ "Brexit breakthrough in Brussels comes after week of drama". CNN. 8 December 2017. Retrieved 8 December 2017. 
  249. ^ "UK snow: Amber warning issued across large parts of country". BBC. 10 December 2017. Retrieved 10 December 2017. 
  250. ^ Amos, Jonathan (11 December 2017). "Mt Hope installed as 'UK's highest peak'". Retrieved 11 December 2017 – via www.bbc.com. 
  251. ^ "UK inflation rate rises to 3.1%". BBC News. 12 December 2017. Retrieved 12 December 2017. 
  252. ^ "Government loses key Brexit bill vote after Tory rebellion". BBC News. 13 December 2017. Retrieved 13 December 2017. 
  253. ^ "Scottish income tax changes unveiled". BBC News. BBC. 14 December 2017. Retrieved 14 December 2017. 
  254. ^ Siddique, Haroon (15 December 2017). "EU leaders agree to move to second-stage Brexit talks – as it happened". The Guardian. 
  255. ^ "Uber driver arrested after Briton murdered in Lebanon". BBC News. BBC. 18 December 2017. Retrieved 18 December 2017. 
  256. ^ "Birmingham crash: Six dead in six-vehicle smash". BBC News. BBC. 17 December 2017. Retrieved 17 December 2017. 
  257. ^ "Sheffield arrests over 'alleged UK Christmas terror plot'". BBC News. BBC. 19 December 2017. Retrieved 19 December 2017. 
  258. ^ "EU says Brexit transition to end by 31 December 2020". BBC News. BBC. 20 December 2017. Retrieved 20 December 2017. 
  259. ^ "Damian Green resigns from cabinet". BBC News. BBC. 20 December 2017. Retrieved 20 December 2017. 
  260. ^ "Family pay tribute to woman killed in Aldi stabbing". The Guardian. 22 December 2017. Retrieved 22 December 2017. 
  261. ^ "Lord Adonis quits government role with Brexit attack". BBC News. 29 December 2017. Retrieved 29 December 2017. 
  262. ^ a b "Sydney seaplane: UK businessman and family named as victims". BBC News. 1 January 2018. Retrieved 1 January 2018. 
  263. ^ "Four young men die in New Year London stabbings". BBC News. 1 January 2018. Retrieved 1 January 2018. 
  264. ^ "John Berger, art critic and author of Ways of Seeing, dies". BBC News. 3 January 2017. Retrieved 3 January 2017. 
  265. ^ "Singer-songwriter Peter Sarstedt dies aged 75". BBC News. Retrieved 8 January 2017. 
  266. ^ Carr, David. "Grand National hero Fletcher dies aged 69". Racing Post. Retrieved 12 January 2017. 
  267. ^ "Political expert Professor Anthony King dies aged 82". BBC News. 12 January 2017. Retrieved 12 January 2017. 
  268. ^ "Graham Taylor: Former England manager dies at the age of 72". BBC Sport. Retrieved 12 January 2017. 
  269. ^ "Lord Snowdon dies aged 86". BBC News. 13 January 2017. Retrieved 13 January 2017. 
  270. ^ "'Allo 'Allo! star Gorden Kaye dies aged 75". BBC News. 23 January 2017. Retrieved 23 January 2017. 
  271. ^ "Human rights 'founding father', Sir Nigel Rodley, dies". BBC News. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  272. ^ "Former Labour MP Tam Dalyell dies". BBC News. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  273. ^ "Sir Howard Hodgkin: Turner winner and abstract artist dies at 84". BBC News. Retrieved 9 March 2017. 
  274. ^ "John Surtees: Former F1 world champion dies at 83". BBC Sport. Retrieved 11 March 2017. 
  275. ^ "Colin Dexter, creator of Inspector Morse, dies aged 86". BBC News. 21 March 2017. Retrieved 22 March 2017. 
  276. ^ "Civil rights activist Darcus Howe dies aged 74". BBC News. 2 April 2017. Retrieved 2 April 2017. 
  277. ^ "Actor Tim Pigott-Smith dies aged 70". BBC News. 7 April 2017. Retrieved 8 April 2017. 
  278. ^ "Leo Baxendale: Bash Street Kids and Minnie the Minx comic legend dies". BBC News. 27 April 2017. Retrieved 28 April 2017. 
  279. ^ "Former First Minister Rhodri Morgan dies". BBC News. 18 May 2017. Retrieved 18 May 2017. 
  280. ^ "Sir Roger Moore, James Bond actor, dies aged 89". BBC News. 23 May 2017. Retrieved 23 May 2017. 
  281. ^ "Former Blue Peter presenter John Noakes dies at 83". BBC News. 29 May 2017. Retrieved 29 May 2017. 
  282. ^ "Coronation Street actor Roy Barraclough dies aged 81". BBC News. 1 June 2017. Retrieved 1 June 2017. 
  283. ^ "Peter Sallis: Last of the Summer Wine actor dies aged 96". BBC News. 5 June 2017. Retrieved 5 June 2017. 
  284. ^ "David 'Dandy' Nicholls: Former trainer dies aged 61". BBC Sport. Retrieved 4 June 2017. 
  285. ^ "Bodger and Badger creator Andy Cunningham dies aged 67". BBC News. 7 June 2017. Retrieved 7 June 2017. 
  286. ^ "Errol Christie: Tributes to 'hugely talented' boxing champ". BBC News. 12 June 2017. Retrieved 13 June 2017. 
  287. ^ "Prince Philip's cousin Countess Mountbatten dies aged 93". BBC News. 14 June 2017. Retrieved 14 June 2017. 
  288. ^ "Paddington Bear creator Michael Bond dies". BBC News. 28 June 2017. Retrieved 28 June 2017. 
  289. ^ "Film critic Barry Norman dies". BBC News. 1 July 2017. Retrieved 1 July 2017. 
  290. ^ "Grotbags actress Carol Lee Scott dies aged 74". BBC News. 6 July 2017. Retrieved 6 July 2017. 
  291. ^ "Diversity star Robert Anker dies in car crash aged 27". BBC News. 29 July 2017. Retrieved 29 July 2017. 
  292. ^ "Harry Potter actor Robert Hardy dies at 91". BBC News. 3 August 2017. Retrieved 3 August 2017. 
  293. ^ "Sir Bruce Forsyth: TV legend dies aged 89". BBC News. 18 August 2017. Retrieved 18 August 2017. 
  294. ^ "Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O'Connor dies at 85". BBC News. 1 September 2017. Retrieved 1 September 2017. 
  295. ^ "Funeral Times – Death Notice Michael (Mick) SOFTLEY". Funeraltimes.com. Retrieved 2 September 2017. 
  296. ^ "David Shepherd, legendary wildlife photographer dies". Daily Express. 20 September 2017. Retrieved 20 September 2017. 
  297. ^ "Sir Teddy Taylor, former Southend-on-Sea MP, dies aged 80". BBC News. 21 September 2017. Retrieved 21 September 2017. 
  298. ^ "Tony Booth: Till Death Us Do Part actor dies at 85". BBC News. 26 September 2017. Retrieved 26 September 2017. 
  299. ^ "Liz Dawn: Coronation Street's Vera Duckworth dies at 77". BBC News. 26 September 2017. Retrieved 26 September 2017. 
  300. ^ Rose, Steve (9 October 2017). "David Marks obituary". The Guardian. Retrieved 13 October 2017. 
  301. ^ Pilnick, Brent. "Brian 'Stack' Stevens: Former England & Lions prop dies aged 77". BBC Sport. Retrieved 12 October 2017. 
  302. ^ "Patrick Haslam dies at 69 following battle with illness". Racing Post. Retrieved 15 October 2017. 
  303. ^ "Sean Hughes: Actor, comedian and writer dies aged 51". BBC News. 16 October 2017. Retrieved 16 October 2017. 
  304. ^ "Actress Rosemary Leach dies after 'short illness'". BBC News. 22 October 2017. Retrieved 22 October 2017. 
  305. ^ "Welsh Labour politician Carl Sargeant took own life days after being suspended over allegations about his conduct with women". The Telegraph. 7 November 2017. 
  306. ^ "Death of Featherstone Rovers legend Les Tonks". www.pontefractandcastlefordexpress.co.uk. Retrieved 11 December 2017. 
  307. ^ "Obituary – Rodney Bewes". BBC News. 21 November 2017. Retrieved 21 November 2017. 
  308. ^ "Christine Keeler dead: Model at centre of Profumo affair dies aged 75". The Independent. 5 December 2017. Retrieved 5 December 2017. 
  309. ^ "Tommy Horton: Former Ryder Cup golfer dies at the age of 76". BBC Sport. Retrieved 8 December 2017. 
  310. ^ "Peter Walwyn: Former champion trainer dies at 84". Racing Post. Retrieved 8 December 2017. 
  311. ^ "Max Clifford dies in hospital aged 74". BBC News. 10 December 2017. Retrieved 10 December 2017. 
  312. ^ "Keith Chegwin: 'True telly legend' dies aged 60". BBC News. 11 December 2017. Retrieved 11 December 2017. 
  313. ^ "Heinz Wolff, Great Egg Race presenter and scientist, dies". BBC News. 16 December 2017. Retrieved 16 December 2017.