GABRA6

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Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptor, alpha 6
Identifiers
Symbols GABRA6 ; MGC116903; MGC116904
External IDs OMIM137143 MGI95618 HomoloGene20220 IUPHAR: α6 ChEMBL: 2579 GeneCards: GABRA6 Gene
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE GABRA6 207182 at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 2559 14399
Ensembl ENSG00000145863 ENSMUSG00000020428
UniProt Q16445 P16305
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_000811 NM_001099641
RefSeq (protein) NP_000802 NP_001093111
Location (UCSC) Chr 5:
160.97 – 161.13 Mb
Chr 11:
42.31 – 42.32 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]

Gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit alpha-6 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the GABRA6 gene.[1][2]

GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain where it acts at GABA-A receptors, which are ligand-gated chloride channels. Chloride conductance of these channels can be modulated by agents such as benzodiazepines that bind to the GABA-A receptor. At least 16 distinct subunits of GABA-A receptors have been identified.[2]

One study has found a genetic variant in the gene to be associated with the personality trait neuroticism.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hicks AA, Bailey ME, Riley BP, Kamphuis W, Siciliano MJ, Johnson KJ, Darlison MG (Aug 1994). "Further evidence for clustering of human GABAA receptor subunit genes: localization of the alpha 6-subunit gene (GABRA6) to distal chromosome 5q by linkage analysis". Genomics 20 (2): 285–8. doi:10.1006/geno.1994.1167. PMID 8020978. 
  2. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: GABRA6 gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptor, alpha 6". 
  3. ^ Srijan Sen, Sandra Villafuerte, Randolph Nesse, Scott F. Stoltenberg, Jeffrey Hopcian, Lillian Gleiberman, Alan Weder & Margit Burmeister (February 2004). "Serotonin transporter and GABAA alpha 6 receptor variants are associated with neuroticism". Biological Psychiatry 55 (3): 244–249. doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2003.08.006. PMID 14744464. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.