Eurovision Song Contest 1984

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Eurovision Song Contest 1984
ESC 1984 logo.png
Dates
Final5 May 1984
Host
VenueThéâtre Municipal
Luxembourg City, Luxembourg
Presenter(s)Désirée Nosbusch
Musical directorPierre Cao
Directed byRené Steichen
Executive supervisorFrank Naef
Executive producerRay van Cant
Host broadcasterRTL Télévision (RTL)
Opening actIn an introductory video, Pierre Cao and the RTL orchestra performed instrumental versions of all the past Eurovision winners from Luxembourg and L'amour est bleu, one of Luxembourg's most popular entries.
Interval actPrague Theatre of Illuminated Drawings
Websiteeurovision.tv/event/luxembourg-1984 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries19
Debuting countriesNone
Returning countries Ireland
Non-returning countries
  • Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 1984Italy in the Eurovision Song Contest 1984Netherlands in the Eurovision Song Contest 1984Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1984Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest 1984United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest 1984Monaco in the Eurovision Song ContestLuxembourg in the Eurovision Song Contest 1984Spain in the Eurovision Song Contest 1984Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1984Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 1984Finland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1984Norway in the Eurovision Song Contest 1984Portugal in the Eurovision Song Contest 1984Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 1984Israel in the Eurovision Song ContestGreece in the Eurovision Song ContestMalta in the Eurovision Song ContestAustria in the Eurovision Song Contest 1984France in the Eurovision Song Contest 1984Turkey in the Eurovision Song Contest 1984Yugoslavia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1984Morocco in the Eurovision Song ContestCyprus in the Eurovision Song Contest 1984A coloured map of the countries of Europe
    About this image
         Participating countries     Countries that participated in the past but not in 1984
Vote
Voting systemEach country awarded 12, 10, 8-1 point(s) to their 10 favourite songs
Nul pointsNone
Winning song Sweden
"Diggi-Loo Diggi-Ley"
1983 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 1985

The Eurovision Song Contest 1984, the 29th edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Luxembourg City, Luxembourg, following the country's victory at the 1983 contest with the song "Si la vie est cadeau" by Corinne Hermes. It was the fourth time Luxembourg hosted the competition, having previously done so in 1962, 1966 and 1973. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster RTL Télévision (RTL), the contest was held at the Théâtre Municipal on Saturday 5 May 1984 and was hosted by Désirée Nosbusch.

Nineteen countries took part in the contest. Israel did not enter due to it conflicting with the country's Yom HaZikaron holiday. Greece was also absent. Ireland that had not participated the previous year, returned this year. Iceland was going to participate for the first time but withdrew due to lack of financial support.[1]

The winner was Sweden with the song "Diggi-Loo Diggi-Ley" by the Herreys. This was the Nordic country's second win, and the first one in Swedish, as ABBA performed "Waterloo" in English when they won in 1974. Richard and Louis Herrey became the first teenage males to win Eurovision and remain the youngest ever male winners, being 19 years and 260 days and 18 years and 184 days of age respectively.[2]

Location[edit]

Grand Théâtre, Luxembourg City - host venue of the 1984 contest.

Luxembourg City is a commune with city status, and the capital of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. It is located at the confluence of the Alzette and Pétrusse Rivers in southern Luxembourg. The city contains the historic Luxembourg Castle, established by the Franks in the Early Middle Ages, around which a settlement developed.

The Grand Théâtre de Luxembourg, inaugurated in 1964 as the Théâtre Municipal de la Ville de Luxembourg, became the venue for the 1984 contest. It is the city's major venue for drama, opera and ballet.[3][4] It also hosted the 1973 edition of the Eurovision Song Contest.

Format[edit]

Roland de Groot, who had also designed the set for the 1970, 1976 and 1980 contests, returned with a stage concept similar to that of 1976, using translucent panels of varying shapes suspended above the stage and operated on a pully system of ropes, with color changes for each panel to create unique backdrops for each entry.[5] Unusually, the live orchestra was not seen on camera, being positioned slightly under the stage itself in a traditional orchestra pit, out of sight of the cameras.

The presentation by Désirée Nosbusch, a Luxembourg native working and living in the USA, made her at 19 years-of-age, the youngest host of the Grand Prix to date. She hosted the show in a lax manner, which was quite unusual for the show at the time. Her style was unusual in that rather than making announcements in multiple languages, she instead switched between English, French, German and Luxembourgish mid-sentence, not finishing any of her announcements in a single language.

The postcards in between each song were of a similar concept to those first devised for the 1979 competition and featured mime artists virtually visiting each of the participant nations. The actors, known collectively as "The Tourists" were superimposed into animated representations of the tourist attractions of each country, with the combined use of animated and real props, all created using the Chroma-Key process.[6]

1984 is also notable for the audible booing that could be heard from the audience, particularly at the end of the UK's performance. It was said that the booing was due to English football hooligans having rioted in Luxembourg in November 1983 after failing to qualify for the 1984 UEFA European Football Championship.

Voting structure[edit]

Before the contest, Sweden was not expected to win or even achieve a high placing. In the run-up to the Contest, bookmakers Ladbrokes had the lowest odds on songs from Ireland, Italy, and the United Kingdom. Sweden was considered a "dark horse" entry with high odds.

Each country had a jury that awarded one to eight, 10 and 12 points for their top ten songs.

At the close of the penultimate jury's votes, there was only a difference of six points between Sweden and Ireland, at 141 and 135 respectively. However, Yugoslavia was the only country who had not given any points to Ireland, and Portugal, the last jury, gave that western country only two points, crushing their chances. Portugal's voting also cost Denmark, who had been holding at a strong third position, even leading the scoreboard for a short time, in that place, when Portugal's 12 lifted Spain from 94 to 106 points. Portugal at the same time had only given Denmark one point making Denmark's total 101 points. Despite this, this was the latter country's best position in over 20 years.

Participating countries[edit]

Conductors[edit]

Each performance had a conductor who directed the orchestra.[7][8]

Returning artists[edit]

Artist Country Previous year(s)
Mary Roos  Germany 1972
Kit Rolfe (part of Belle and the Devotions)  United Kingdom 1983 (backing singer)
Izolda Barudžija (part of Vlado & Isolda)  Yugoslavia 1982 (part of Aska), 1983 (part of Danijel's back vocals)
Gary Lux (backing singer for Anita)  Austria 1983 (as member of Westend)

Results[edit]

Draw Country Artist Song Language[9][10] Place[11] Points
01  Sweden Herreys "Diggi-Loo Diggi-Ley" Swedish 1 145
02  Luxembourg Sophie Carle "100% d'amour" French 10 39
03  France Annick Thoumazeau "Autant d'amoureux que d'étoiles" French 8 61
04  Spain Bravo "Lady, Lady" Spanish[a] 3 106
05  Norway Dollie de Luxe "Lenge leve livet" Norwegian 17 29
06  United Kingdom Belle and the Devotions "Love Games" English 7 63
07  Cyprus Andy Paul "Anna Maria Lena" (Άννα Μαρία Λένα) Greek 15 31
08  Belgium Jacques Zegers "Avanti la vie" French[b] 5 70
09  Ireland Linda Martin "Terminal 3" English 2 137
10  Denmark Hot Eyes "Det' lige det" Danish 4 101
11  Netherlands Maribelle "Ik hou van jou" Dutch 13 34
12  Yugoslavia Vlado & Isolda "Ciao, amore" Serbo-Croatian[b] 18 26
13  Austria Anita "Einfach weg" German 19 5
14  Germany Mary Roos "Aufrecht geh'n" German 13 34
15  Turkey Beş Yıl Önce, On Yıl Sonra "Halay" Turkish 12 37
16  Finland Kirka "Hengaillaan" Finnish 9 46
17   Switzerland Rainy Day "Welche Farbe hat der Sonnenschein?" German 16 30
18  Italy Alice & Franco Battiato "I treni di Tozeur" Italian[c] 5 70
19  Portugal Maria Guinot "Silêncio e tanta gente" Portuguese 11 38

Scoreboard[edit]

Voting results[12][13]
Total score
Sweden
Luxembourg
France
Spain
Norway
United Kingdom
Cyprus
Belgium
Ireland
Denmark
Netherlands
Yugoslavia
Austria
Germany
Turkey
Finland
Switzerland
Italy
Portugal
Contestants
Sweden 145 6 6 4 10 7 12 7 12 12 10 4 12 12 3 8 10 6 4
Luxembourg 39 7 7 5 5 8 4 3
France 61 2 2 6 3 10 12 8 4 7 7
Spain 106 10 8 10 6 4 6 3 7 7 2 2 6 12 3 8 12
Norway 29 8 7 1 3 2 6 2
United Kingdom 63 3 1 3 8 2 2 8 1 4 1 2 7 1 4 10 6
Cyprus 31 4 1 4 10 12
Belgium 70 12 12 2 3 8 3 4 5 10 1 10
Ireland 137 12 5 3 10 4 8 10 12 3 7 10 10 10 7 12 12 2
Denmark 101 5 3 8 6 12 12 5 8 10 3 6 4 5 2 5 1 5 1
Netherlands 34 2 7 8 1 6 5 5
Yugoslavia 26 2 3 8 3 8 2
Austria 5 1 4
Germany 34 4 7 2 6 2 5 1 2 5
Turkey 37 6 5 4 2 1 10 3 6
Finland 46 7 5 1 5 4 6 3 5 1 6 3
Switzerland 30 1 10 1 5 8 1 4
Italy 70 10 12 1 7 6 7 12 7 8
Portugal 38 4 5 6 7 8 8

12 points[edit]

Below is a summary of all 12 points in the final:

N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
5  Sweden  Austria,  Cyprus,  Denmark,  Germany,  Ireland
4  Ireland  Belgium,  Italy,  Sweden,   Switzerland
2  Belgium  France,  Luxembourg
 Denmark  Norway,  United Kingdom
 Italy  Spain,  Finland
 Spain  Portugal,  Turkey
1  Cyprus  Yugoslavia
 France  Netherlands

Spokespersons[edit]

Each country announced their votes in the order of performance. The following is a list of spokespersons who announced the votes for their respective country.

Broadcasts[edit]

National broadcasters were able to send a commentary team to the contest, in order to provide coverage of the contest in their own native language.

Broadcasters and commentators in participating countries
Country Broadcaster(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Austria FS2 Ernst Grissemann [de] [23]
 Belgium RTBF1 French: Jacques Mercier [24]
BRT TV1 Dutch: Luc Appermont [25]
 Cyprus RIK Pavlos Pavlou [18]
 Denmark DR TV Jørgen de Mylius [26]
 Finland YLE TV1 Heikki Seppälä [fi] [27]
YLE Rinnakkaisohjelma Jaakko Salonoja [fi]
 France Antenne 2 Léon Zitrone [24]
 Germany Erstes Deutsches Fernsehen Ado Schlier [de] [28]
Deutschlandfunk Roger Horné [de]
 Ireland RTÉ 1 Gay Byrne
RTÉ Radio 1 Larry Gogan
 Italy Rai Due Antonio De Robertis
Rai Radio 1
 Luxembourg RTL Télévision Valérie Sarn [fr] and Jacques Navadic [24]
RTL plus Helmut Thoma [de] and Karlchen [de]
 Netherlands Nederland 1 Ivo Niehe [29]
 Norway NRK Roald Øyen [30]
 Portugal RTP1 Fialho Gouveia [31]
 Spain TVE 2 José-Miguel Ullán [32]
 Sweden TV1 Fredrik Belfrage [14]
  Switzerland TV DRS German: Bernard Thurnheer [de]
TSR French: Serge Moisson [fr]
TSI Italian: Ezio Guidi [it]
 Turkey TRT Başak Doğru
 United Kingdom BBC1 Terry Wogan [33][8]
British Forces Radio Richard Nankivell [8]
 Yugoslavia TVB 2 Serbo-Croatian: Mladen Popović
TVZ 1 Serbo-Croatian: Oliver Mlakar
TVL 1 Slovene: Tomaž Terček [sl]
Broadcasters and commentators in non-participating countries
Country Broadcaster(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Australia Network 0–28 Unknown
 Iceland Sjónvarpið Unknown
 Israel Israeli Television No commentator (delayed broadcast)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Contains some words in English
  2. ^ a b Contains some words in Italian
  3. ^ Contains some words in German

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Morgunblaðið, 20.03.1983". Timarit.is. Retrieved 2013-04-29.
  2. ^ O'Connor, John Kennedy. The Eurovision Song Contest - The Official Celebration. Carlton Books, 2015. ISBN 978-1-78097-638-9. Pages 32-33
  3. ^ "The "Grand Théâtre" of Luxembourg City offers high quality cultural events" Archived 2011-07-22 at the Wayback Machine, Luxembourg National Tourist Office, London. Retrieved 27 December 2010.
  4. ^ "Grand Théâtre de Luxembourg" Archived 2011-07-22 at the Wayback Machine, Théâtre Info Luxembourg. (in French) Retrieved 27 December 2010.
  5. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HjwFrg0GIFg
  6. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EaaNGPSvaQ
  7. ^ "And the conductor is..." Retrieved 10 September 2020.
  8. ^ a b c Roxburgh, Gordon (2017). Songs For Europe - The United Kingdom at the Eurovision Song Contest. Volume Three: The 1980s. UK: Telos Publishing. pp. 200–211. ISBN 978-1-84583-118-9.
  9. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1984". The Diggiloo Thrush. Retrieved 4 March 2012.
  10. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1984". 4Lyrics.eu. Retrieved 16 September 2020.
  11. ^ "Final of Luxembourg 1984". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 15 April 2021. Retrieved 15 April 2021.
  12. ^ "Results of the Final of Luxembourg 1984". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 15 April 2021. Retrieved 15 April 2021.
  13. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1984 – Scoreboard". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 21 October 2021.
  14. ^ a b "Infosajten.com". Infosajten.com. Archived from the original on July 18, 2012. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  15. ^ Zitrone, Léon et al. (May 5, 1984). 29ème Concours Eurovision de la Chanson 1984 [29th Eurovision Song Contest 1984] (Television production). Luxembourg: RTL, Antenne 2 (commentary).
  16. ^ Dyrseth, Seppo (OGAE Norway)
  17. ^ a b "The Eurovision Song Contest (1984 TV Special) : Full Cast & Crew". IMDb.com. Retrieved 2013-10-22.
  18. ^ a b Savvidis, Christos (OGAE Cyprus)
  19. ^ "ESC 1984 - Danish comments (DR) 4:6".
  20. ^ Leidse Courant, 5 May 1984
  21. ^ "Selostajat ja taustalaulajat läpi vuosien? • Viisukuppila". Viisukuppila.fi. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  22. ^ Baumann, Peter Ramón (OGAE Switzerland)
  23. ^ [1] Archived October 24, 2007, at the Wayback Machine
  24. ^ a b c Christian Masson. "1984 - Luxembourg". Songcontest.free.fr. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  25. ^ Adriaens, Manu & Loeckx-Van Cauwenberge, Joken. Blijven kiken!. Lannoo, Belgium. 2003 ISBN 90-209-5274-9
  26. ^ "Forside". esconnet.dk. Archived from the original on 2012-03-24. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  27. ^ "Selostajat ja taustalaulajat läpi vuosien? • Viisukuppila". Viisukuppila.fi. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  28. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1984". Ecgermany.de. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  29. ^ "Welkom op de site van Eurovision Artists". Eurovisionartists.nl. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  30. ^ "Hvem kommenterte før Jostein Pedersen? - Debattforum". Nrk.no. Archived from the original on November 2, 2012. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  31. ^ "Comentadores Do ESC - escportugalforum.pt.vu | o forum eurovisivo português". 21595.activeboard.com. Archived from the original on April 21, 2012. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  32. ^ "FORO FESTIVAL DE EUROVISIÓN • Ver Tema - Uribarri comentarista Eurovision 2010". Eurosongcontest.phpbb3.es. Archived from the original on 2012-03-17. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  33. ^ Eurovision Song Contest 1984 BBC Archives

External links[edit]