Cark and Cartmel railway station

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Cark and Cartmel National Rail
Carkstn.jpg
Main building at Cark & Cartmel station
Location
Place Cark
Local authority South Lakeland
Coordinates 54°10′41″N 2°58′23″W / 54.178°N 2.973°W / 54.178; -2.973Coordinates: 54°10′41″N 2°58′23″W / 54.178°N 2.973°W / 54.178; -2.973
Grid reference SD365762
Operations
Station code CAK
Managed by Northern
Number of platforms 2
DfT category F2
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2011/12 Decrease 51,690
2012/13 Increase 60,588
2013/14 Increase 64,754
2014/15 Increase 70,980
2015/16 Increase 76,448
History
Key dates Opened 1857 (1857)
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Cark and Cartmel from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.
170433 at Edinburgh Waverley.JPG UK Railways portal
View in 1986

Cark and Cartmel railway station (often just Cark railway station) is a railway station that serves the villages of Cark, Flookburgh and Cartmel in Cumbria, England. It is located on the Furness Line from Barrow-in-Furness to Lancaster.

History[edit]

The station is architecturally interesting, with a main building (see image) erected by the Ulverston and Lancaster Railway (U&LR) in 1857. The station opened on 1 September 1857 as Cark-in-Cartmell. The current name was adopted in 1906. The Furness Railway took over the U&LR on 21 January 1862 and was absorbed into the London Midland & Scottish Railway on 1 January 1923.

The station had a particular importance, as it serves Holker Hall, the home of Lord Cavendish of Furness formerly belonging to the Dukes of Devonshire. Special waiting rooms were provided for the dukes and their guests. The actual building retains many original features and is now a private residence. It extends to approximately one acre of gardens and woodland.

Facilities[edit]

The station is unstaffed and has no ticket facilities of any kind (tickets must be purchased on the train or in advance). There are shelters and digital information screens on each platform, along with a long-line P.A system for train running information provision. The platforms are linked by a footbridge, but step-free access is also available on each side for disabled travellers.[1]

Service[edit]

The station is on the Furness line linking Lancaster and Barrow (though some services extend south to Preston or north east to Carlisle).

  • The station receives a roughly hourly service to Barrow operated by Northern and calling at:
Ulverston, Dalton, Roose and Barrow-in-Furness.
Four of these services continue from Barrow on to Carlisle calling at:
Askam, Kirkby-in-Furness, Foxfield, Green Road, Millom, Silecroft, Bootle, Ravenglass, Drigg, Seascale, Sellafield, Braystones, Nethertown, St Bees, Corkickle, Whitehaven, Parton, Harrington, Workington, Flimby, Maryport, Aspatria, Wigton, Dalston and Carlisle. One evening train terminates at Millom.
  • There is also a roughly hourly service towards Lancaster, calling at:
Kents Bank, Grange over Sands, Arnside, Silverdale, Carnforth and Lancaster. Three services a day are extended to Preston, calling additionally at Preston only

A limited number of services continue through to Manchester Airport via Bolton and Manchester Piccadilly - these were formerly operated by First TransPennine Express up until the end of the old Northern and TransPennine franchises on 31 March 2016.

Sundays see a two-hourly service each way (no service north of Barrow).[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cark and Cartmel Station Information National Rail Enquiries; Retrieved 25 November 2016
  2. ^ Table 82 National Rail timetable, December 2016

External links[edit]

Preceding station   National Rail National Rail   Following station
Northern
Furness Line