Serundeng

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Serundeng
Serundeng Daging.jpg
Serundeng daging, fried beef with spicy sauteed grated coconut
Course Main course or snack
Place of origin Indonesia
Region or state Java
Serving temperature Room temperature
Main ingredients Grated coconut spiced and sauteed and sprinkled upon another dishes, such as fried beef, soto or ketan (sticky rice)
Cookbook:Serundeng  Serundeng

Serundeng is an Indonesian sauteed grated coconut that is often used as a side dish to accompany rice.[1] First, spices and seasonings like onions, chili peppers, garlic, onion, coriander, turmeric, sugar, tamarind, bay leaves (daun salam), lime leaves (daun jeruk purut), and galangal are ground to a paste and fried.[2] Then grated coconut is fried until golden brown and mixed with the seasoning paste and roasted peanuts. Freshly shredded coconut, instead of grated coconut left over from making coconut milk, gives a richer taste.[citation needed] Serundeng can be mixed with meat in dishes such as serundeng daging (beef serundeng) or sprinkled on top of other dishes such as soto or ketan (sticky rice).

In Indonesia, beef serundeng usually tastes rather sweet because of the addition of coconut sugar, and commonly associated with Javanese cuisine. Serundeng as grated coconut sprinkled dry condiment is also found in Betawi cuisine of Jakarta, and Makassar cuisine of South Sulawesi, usually applied upon soto, ketan, or burasa (rice in banana leaf cooked in coconut milk).

In Malaysia, the term serunding refers to meat floss instead, it can be mixed with grated coconut or not. While in Indonesia, meat floss is called abon, and serundeng is clearly refer to spiced and sauteed grated coconut.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.indochinekitchen.com/recipes/fragrant-coconut-flakes-serundeng/
  2. ^ http://asiancook.eu/indonesian/hidangan/296-serundeng-fried-coconut-with-peanuts