Pan mee

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Pan mee
PanMee.jpg
Pan mee (torn) served in soup
Place of origin
Malaysia
Main ingredients
Flour
Cookbook:Pan mee  Pan mee

Pan Mee (Chinese: 板麺, pronounced as ban mian) is a Hakka-style noodle, originating from Malaysia. Its Chinese name literally translates to "flat flour noodle". It is part of Malaysian Chinese cuisine.

The dough is made from flour (sometimes egg is added for more flavor). Traditionally, the dough is hand-kneaded and torn into smaller pieces of dough (about 2 inches). Nowadays, the dough can be kneaded using machine into a variety of shapes, the most common shape being flat strips of noodle.

Pan Mee is typically served in soup, together with dried anchovies, minced pork, mushrooms, and a leafy vegetable such as sweet potato leaves or sayur manis (sauropus androgynus).[1] It can also be served dry with a thick black soya sauce (also known as dried pan mee). Other serving styles include curry broth, chili-based broth,[2] and pork belly.

The soup plays a very important role in the preparation of pan mee. Typically, the soup is prepared by boiling pig bones and dried anchovies for hours in order to bring out the flavor. In the case of curry broth, a diluted form of curry is used.

Dry chilli pan mee is also becoming popular, especially in the Klang Valley.[3] This dry noodle is served with minced pork, fried onions, anchovies, and topped with a poached egg which is stirred into the noodles. The most important part of the dish is the dry chilli mix (or sambal) which is served with it. Those with a strong tolerance for chillies often add several spoonfuls of the chilli to the noodles, though most are content with one spoon of the fiery chilli.

Pan Mee is typically eaten for breakfast, but it is widely available and commonly eaten for lunch and dinner as well. In Malaysia, one can find pan mee at hawker stalls, restaurants, and shopping malls offering Chinese cuisine. The price may vary, depending on the location of the restaurant or eatery. It usually costs less at hawker stalls but can cost more at restaurants, shopping malls, commercial and developed areas. This is due to tax, profit margins and the availability of the ingredients.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Beh, Amy (June 20, 2003). "Pan Mein (Flat Flour Noodle Soup)". The Star Online - Kuali. Kuala Lumpur.  Archived February 1, 2010 at the Wayback Machine.
  2. ^ "Chili Pan Mee". Malaysian Food Guide. 23 June 2007. 
  3. ^ "How To Eat Chilli Pan Mee?". Restoran Super Kitchen Chilli Pan Mee. Retrieved 29 January 2012.