Lancôme

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Lancôme
Subsidiary of L'Oréal since 1964
Industry Fashion
Founded 1935; 81 years ago (1935)
Founder Armand Petitjean
Headquarters Paris, France
Products Perfumes and cosmetics
Parent L'Oréal
Website www.lancome.com

Lancôme is a French luxury perfumes and cosmetics house that distributes products internationally.[1] Lancôme is part of the L'Oreal Luxury Products division, which is its parent company and offers skin care, fragrances, and makeup at higher-end prices.

History[edit]

Lancôme Boutique on NYC's Upper West Side

Founded in 1935 by Armand Petitjean in France, as originally a fragrance house. The name "Lancôme" was inspired by the ruins of a castle, Le Château de Lancosme, while the roses in the area inspired the company's symbol of the single golden rose.[2]

Lancôme launched its first five fragrances in 1935 at the World's Fair in Brussels: Tendre Nuit, Bocages, Conquete, Kypre and Tropiques. Petitjean entered into the luxury skincare market, launching Nutrix, his first "all-purpose repair cream" in 1936, followed by make-up, cosmetics, and skincare products. Lancôme was acquired by L'oreal in 1964, and quickly became part of its luxury products division.

Products[edit]

Lancôme counter at DFS Galleria Customhouse in Auckland, New Zealand

The company provides fragrances, skin care, and makeup. Their most famous products include their mascaras, namely "Hypnôse", their Visionnaire Range which contains a patented ingredient, "LR 2412", aimed to improve skin texture qualities, especially in pore reduction, fine lines and uneven skin tone.[citation needed] Lancome has recently released a new serum called "Dreamtone", which claims to improve on colour irregularities including sun spots and blemish marks.[citation needed] The serum is available in three colour integrals, fair, medium and dark to match individual skin tones.

Lancôme fragrances are made in association with perfumers: Alain Astori, Annick Menardo, Daniela Roche-Andrier, Christian Biecher, Jacques Cavallier, Calice Becker, Pauline Zanoni, Maurice Roucel, Thierry Wasser, Christine Nage, Armand Petitjean, Gerard Goupy, Olivier Cresp, Harry Fremont, Alberto Morillas, Dominique Ropion, Olivier Polge, Francis Kurkdjian, Robert Gonnon, Nathalie Lorson, Sophia Grojsman, and Alienor Massenet.

Advertising[edit]

Despite founder Armand Petijean's assertion that Lancôme never advertise, today Lancôme is one of the top advertisers in the luxury beauty arena. Its ads can be seen in numerous publications worldwide, from Harper's Bazaar to French Vogue. Lancôme's ads have been shot by the leading photographers, including Peter Lindbergh, Mario Testino, Mario Sorrenti, Nick Knight, Steven Meisel, Brigitte Lacombe, Patrick Demarchelier & Dusan Reljin.

In 2012 Lancôme premiered a TV advertisement featuring 1930s cartoon icon Betty Boop.[3] Supermodel Daria Werbowy and Betty talk candidly as Betty gives Daria advice about how to find a role in her "first big film".

Spokesmodels and spokespersons[edit]

The brand is represented by actresses, global supermodels, makeup artists and perfumers. Emerging fashion designers have collaborated with the brand, including design duo Proenza Schouler, who created a dress inspired by Lancôme's Hypnôse fragrance, and Alber Elbaz who designed the packaging for a trio of mascaras.

In 1978, at the age of eighteen, Carol Alt became the youngest model to be the face of Lancôme. Nancy Dutiel also modeled for Lancôme during this period. More recently, models Shalom Harlow, Marie Gillain and Raica Oliveira[4] have also been spokesmodels for Lancôme.

One of Lancôme's longest-running partnerships was with actress Isabella Rossellini. Signed in 1982, Rossellini was the international face of Lancôme for 14 years.

Ukrainian-Canadian model Daria Werbowy joined the brand in 2005, and has been featured in Lancome ads. Spanish actress and model Inés Sastre has represented Lancôme as a global spokesmodel since 1996, appearing in dozens of Lancôme advertisements over the years.

In September 2008, Dominican model Arlenis Sosa became the spokesmodel for the brand.

in 2009, Isabella Rossellini's daughter Elettra Rossellini Wiedemann became the new face of Lancôme.

Other renowned actresses have also worked with the brand, including Juliette Binoche, Uma Thurman, Drew Barrymore, Mena Suvari, Laura Morante, Kate Winslet,[5] Anne Hathaway,[6] Julia Roberts, Penélope Cruz, Emma Watson, and currently Lupita Nyong'o.[7] Clive Owen was the first male spokesperson for Lancôme's Men's skincare range and the fragrance Hypnôse Homme.

Makeup artists[edit]

Lancôme has collaborated with several makeup artists. Fred Farrugia created 13 colour collections during his tenure as artistic makeup director (1997–2004). His "Pollen" collection in 2000 introduced the industry's first lip gloss in a tube: Juicy Tubes.

Lancôme has several top makeup artists representing it, Aaron De Mey and Sandy Linter. Sandy is Lancôme's "Beauty At Every Age Expert", and Aaron is Lancôme's National Artistic Director for Makeup. Aaron De Mey is no longer the Artistic Director for Lancome. Lancôme UK has recently signed Alex Babsky to be the brand's UK Make Up Ambassador.[8]

Lancôme Makeup announced in January 2015 that UK makeup artist Lisa Eldridge has been appointed as its Global Creative Director.[9]

Controversy[edit]

Hong Kong[edit]

Protesters gathered Times Square mall on 8/6 afternoon
Lancome counters in Lane Crawford have been post many against message after the protest
Main article: Denise Ho

On 5 June 2016, Lancôme canceled a promotional concert by Hong Kong pro-democracy singer Denise Ho that was scheduled to be held on 19 June in Sheung Wan.[10] The cancellation was due to a boycott campaign launched by the Communist Party-controlled Global Times, which denigrated the Cantopop star for supposedly advocating Hong Kong and Tibet independence.[10] Lancôme posted on Facebook that Ho is not a spokesperson for the brand.[11] The cancellation drew a heavy backlash in Hong Kong, resulting in some Lancôme shops in Hong Kong shutting down during the protests.[12] Some Hong Kong merchants refused to accept the political pressure from the Chinese government.[13] Listerine, another brand that Ho represents, retained the singer despite criticism from the Global Times for hiring Ho as its spokesperson.[10]

Ho ended up playing the concert without Lancôme's support.[14]

References[edit]

External links[edit]