Cedar Grove, New Jersey

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Cedar Grove, New Jersey
Township
Township of Cedar Grove
Pompton Avenue and Ridge Road
Pompton Avenue and Ridge Road
Map of Cedar Grove Township in Essex County. Inset: Location of Essex County in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Cedar Grove Township in Essex County. Inset: Location of Essex County in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Cedar Grove, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Cedar Grove, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°51′29″N 74°13′47″W / 40.858023°N 74.229791°W / 40.858023; -74.229791Coordinates: 40°51′29″N 74°13′47″W / 40.858023°N 74.229791°W / 40.858023; -74.229791[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Essex
Incorporated February 7, 1892 as Verona Township
Renamed April 9, 1908 as Cedar Grove
Government[8]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Council-Manager)
 • Mayor Robert O'Toole (term ends June 30, 2014)[3][4][5]
 • Manager Tom Tucci[6]
 • Clerk Kathleen R. Stutz[7]
Area[1]
 • Total 4.378 sq mi (11.340 km2)
 • Land 4.252 sq mi (11.014 km2)
 • Water 0.126 sq mi (0.326 km2)  2.87%
Area rank 286th of 566 in state
9th of 22 in county[1]
Elevation[9] 243 ft (74 m)
Population (2010 Census)[10][11][12][13]
 • Total 12,411
 • Estimate (2013[14]) 12,470
 • Rank 196th of 566 in state
15th of 22 in county[15]
 • Density 2,918.6/sq mi (1,126.9/km2)
 • Density rank 219th of 566 in state
15th of 22 in county[15]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07009[16][17]
Area code(s) 973[18]
FIPS code 3401311200[1][19][20]
GNIS feature ID 0882222[1][21]
Website www.cedargrovenj.org

Cedar Grove is a township in north central Essex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 12,411,[10][11][12][13] reflecting an increase of 111 (+0.9%) from the 12,300 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 247 (+2.0%) from the 12,053 counted in the 1990 Census.[22]

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Cedar Grove as its 4th best place to live in Essex County and 17th best place overall to live in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.[23]

What is now Cedar Grove was originally incorporated by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature as the Township of Verona on February 7, 1892, from portions of Caldwell Township. Portions of the township were taken to create Verona borough, based on the results of a referendum held on April 30, 1907. On April 9, 1908, the name was formally changed to Cedar Grove.[24]

Geography[edit]

Cedar Grove Township is located at 40°51′29″N 74°13′47″W / 40.858023°N 74.229791°W / 40.858023; -74.229791 (40.858023, −74.229791). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 4.378 square miles (11.340 km2), of which, 4.252 square miles (11.014 km2) of it was land and 0.126 square miles (0.326 km2) of it (2.87%) was water.[1][2]

The township is located between the First and Second Watchung Mountains. The center of the township is in a valley that is about 280 feet (85 m) above sea level; however, many sections of Cedar Grove are well above 400 feet (120 m), including the Park Ridge Estates, the abandoned Essex County Hospital Center, and the eastern, southeastern and southern sections of Cedar Grove. Cedar Grove's highest point is on hilltop, where elevations reach 600 feet (180 m) and above. Cedar Grove is located approximately 12 miles (19 km) west of Midtown Manhattan and 4 miles (6.4 km) northwest of Newark.

The sections of Cedar Grove are:

North End: The North End of Cedar Grove starts after the corner of Fairview Avenue and Pompton Avenue. It consists of mostly homes, but there are some businesses located on Pompton Avenue, as well as at the corner of E. Lindsley Avenue and Stevens Avenue. A notable part of the north end of town is the Park Ridge Estates, which contain million dollar homes.

Central Cedar Grove: This consists of the center of town and extends from the corner of Fairview Avenue and Pompton Avenue to the corner of Bradford Avenue and Pompton Avenue. The central portion of the town contains Cedar Grove's business district. Also, on the west central side of town is the Essex County Hospital Center, and on the east central side is the Cedar Grove Reservoir and Mills Reservation.

South End: The south end of Cedar Grove is the most urbanized part of the township, as it contains homes that are closer together. The south end extends from the corner of Bradford Avenue and Pompton Avenue to the Verona Border. There are mostly homes here, but there are some businesses on Pompton Avenue, including Burger King, The Pilgrim Diner, and Staples. Like the north end of town, the south end contains a section of million dollar homes.

Cedar Grove's population density is less than the surrounding towns of Montclair, Verona, and Little Falls, mainly because significant portions of Cedar Grove are owned or previously owned by county or city governments. The Essex County Hospital Center took up a good amount of land and was owned by Essex County. Also, Mills Reservation is a county owned park, and the Cedar Grove Reservoir property is owned by the City of Newark.

Cedar Grove is bordered by North Caldwell, Little Falls, Montclair, and Verona. Most of the eastern portion of the township is bordered by Upper Montclair (a neighborhood in Montclair).[25]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 2,139
1910 2,409 12.6%
1920 3,181 32.0%
1930 4,793 50.7%
1940 5,208 8.7%
1950 8,022 54.0%
1960 14,603 82.0%
1970 15,582 6.7%
1980 12,600 −19.1%
1990 12,053 −4.3%
2000 12,300 2.0%
2010 12,411 0.9%
Est. 2013 12,470 [14] 0.5%
Population sources: 1900-1920[26]
1900-1910[27] 1910-1930[28]
1930-1990[29] 2000[30][31] 2010[10][11][12][13]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 12,411 people, 4,523 households, and 3,216 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,918.6 per square mile (1,126.9/km2). There were 4,661 housing units at an average density of 1,096.1 per square mile (423.2/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 89.01% (11,047) White, 2.47% (306) Black or African American, 0.05% (6) Native American, 6.53% (811) Asian, 0.01% (1) Pacific Islander, 0.85% (106) from other races, and 1.08% (134) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 5.86% (727) of the population.[11]

There were 4,523 households, of which 29.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.5% were married couples living together, 8.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.9% were non-families. 25.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.12.[11]

In the township, 20.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.6% from 18 to 24, 21.6% from 25 to 44, 28.9% from 45 to 64, and 23.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 46.8 years. For every 100 females there were 87.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.9 males.[11]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $95,152 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,156) and the median family income was $117,935 (+/- $15,917). Males had a median income of $81,330 (+/- $13,013) versus $51,525 (+/- $6,616) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $46,514 (+/- $3,662). About 0.0% of families and 0.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.3% of those under age 18 and 1.3% of those age 65 or over.[32]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[19] there were 12,300 people, 4,403 households, and 3,240 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,913.1 people per square mile (1,125.4/km2). There were 4,470 housing units at an average density of 1,058.7/sq mi (409.0/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 90.05% White, 2.99% African American, 0.05% Native American, 5.42% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.46% from other races, and 1.00% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.20% of the population.[30][31]

As of the 2000 Census, 29.7% of Cedar Grove's residents identified themselves as being of Italian ancestry (adjusted from the 34.8% reported to reflect the fact that residents reported multiple ancestries), the 18th highest of all municipalities in New Jersey.[33] There was also a large Irish population, accounting for 21.7% of the population in the 2000 census, with another 12.1% of German ancestry.[30]

There were 4,403 households out of which 28.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.4% were married couples living together, 7.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.4% were non-families. 23.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.05.[30][31]

In the township the population was spread out with 19.2% under the age of 18, 5.3% from 18 to 24, 27.0% from 25 to 44, 26.0% from 45 to 64, and 22.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 87.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.6 males.[30][31]

The median income for a household in the township was $78,863, and the median income for a family was $94,475. Males had a median income of $66,197 versus $40,582 for females. The per capita income for the township was $36,558. About 1.1% of families and 2.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.8% of those under age 18 and 3.2% of those age 65 or over.[30][31]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Cedar Grove operates under a Faulkner Act form of municipal government under Council-Manager plan B, as implemented as of July 1, 1955, based on the recommendations of a Charter Study Commission.[34] Cedar Grove is governed by a five-member Township Council. Council members are elected at-large for four-year terms, by the voters of the municipality through nonpartisan municipal elections held the 2nd Tuesday in May, in odd-numbered years.[8]

As of 2013, members of the Township Council are Mayor Robert O'Toole (term on council and as mayor ends June 30, 2015), Deputy Mayor E. Romeo Longo (term on council ends 2017, term as deputy mayor ends 2015), Joseph Chiusolo (2017), Peter H. Tanella (2015) and John Zunic (2017).[35][36]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Cedar Grove is located in the 11th Congressional District[37] and is part of New Jersey's 40th state legislative district.[12][38][39] Prior to the 2010 Census, Cedar Grove had been part of the 8th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[40]

New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).[41] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[42][43] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[44][45]

The 40th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Kevin J. O'Toole (R, Cedar Grove) and in the General Assembly by Scott Rumana (R, Wayne) and David C. Russo (R, Ridgewood).[46] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[47] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[48]

Essex County is governed by a directly-elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by the Board of Chosen Freeholders.[49] As of 2014, the County Executive is Joseph N. DiVincenzo, Jr.[50] The county's Board of Chosen Freeholders consists of nine members, four elected on an at-large basis and one from each of five wards, who serve three-year terms of office on a concurrent basis, all of which end December 31, 2014.[49][51][52] Essex County's Freeholders are Freeholder President Blonnie R. Watson (at large; Newark)[53], Freeholder Vice President Patricia Sebold (at large; Livingston)[54], Rufus I. Johnson (at large; Newark)[55], Gerald W. Owens (At large; South Orange, filling the vacant seat after the resignation of Donald Payne, Jr.)[56] Rolando Bobadilla (District 1 - Newark's North and East Wards, parts of Central and West Wards; Newark)[57], D. Bilal Beasley (District 2 - Irvington, Maplewood and Newark's South Ward and parts of West Ward; Irvington)[58], Carol Y. Clark (District 3 - East Orange, Newark's West and Central Wards, Orange and South Orange; East Orange)[59] and Leonard M. Luciano (District 4 - Caldwell, Cedar Grove, Essex Fells, Fairfield, Livingston, Millburn, North Caldwell, Roseland, Verona, West Caldwell and West Orange; West Caldwell),[60] and Brendan W. Gill (District 5 - Belleville, Bloomfield, Glen Ridge, Montclair and Nutley; Montclair).[61][62][63] Constitutional elected countywide are County Clerk Christopher J. Durkin (West Caldwell, 2015),[64] Sheriff Armando B. Fontoura (2015)[65] and Surrogate Theodore N. Stephens, II (2016).[66][51][67]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 8,672 registered voters in Cedar Grove, of which 2,269 (26.2%) were registered as Democrats, 2,215 (25.5%) were registered as Republicans and 4,184 (48.2%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 4 voters registered to other parties.[68]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 59.2% of the vote here (4,013 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 39.5% (2,680 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (43 votes), among the 6,780 ballots cast by the township's 8,695 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.0%.[69] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 59.8% of the vote here (3,817 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 38.9% (2,479 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (66 votes), among the 6,378 ballots cast by the township's 8,215 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 77.6.[70]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 58.3% of the vote here (2,699 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 32.9% (1,524 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 7.0% (323 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (45 votes), among the 4,628 ballots cast by the township's 8,644 registered voters, yielding a 53.5% turnout.[71]

Education[edit]

Public schools[edit]

The Cedar Grove Schools serve public school students from kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[72]) are North End Elementary School[73] (318 students; grades K-4), South End Elementary School[74] (349; K-4), Cedar Grove Memorial Middle School[75] (501; 5-8) and Cedar Grove High School[76] (450; 9-12).[77][78]

Private schools[edit]

Washington Academy is an approved private school for special education. Founded in 1982, the Academy provides specialized academic and behavioral services to students whose disabilities disrupt their academic and behavioral growth and progress. It serves students ages 3–21 (pre-K - 12th Grade). Washington Academy is a member of the National Association of Private Special Education Centers (NAPSEC), a non-profit organization dedicated to serving the needs of private special education schools. The school is located in the former Leonard R. Parks Elementary School on Route 23.[79]

St. Catherine of Siena School is located on Bradford Avenue and operates under the supervision of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark.[80]

History[edit]

Cedar Grove was part of the Horseneck Tract, which was an area that consisted of what are now the municipalities of Caldwell, West Caldwell, North Caldwell, Fairfield, Verona, Cedar Grove, Essex Fells, Roseland, and portions of Livingston and West Orange.

In 1702, settlers purchased the 14,000 acres (57 km2) Horseneck Tract — so-called because of its irregular shape that suggested a horse's neck and head — from the Lenni Lenape Native Americans for goods equal to $325. This purchase encompassed much of western Essex County, from the First Mountain to the Passaic River.

Cedar Grove was originally a small farming community. In 1896, Essex County built the county mental institution in Cedar Grove known as Overbrook. In 1908, Cedar Grove was incorporated as a township. In the 1950s and 1960s, Cedar Grove became one of the destination suburbs in Essex County among those looking to escape urban living from Newark and New York City.

Cedar Grove was once home to Frank Dailey's Meadowbrook Ballroom, located on Route 23, which regularly hosted well-known bands and vocalists, including Buddy Rich, Glenn Miller, Jimmy and Tommy Dorsey, Frank Sinatra, and Jo Stafford. The ballroom, located on the old Pompton Turnpike, still stands, and is used by Sts. Kiril & Methodij Macedonian Orthodox Church.[81]

Commerce[edit]

Commercial business[edit]

Most of the commercial zone in Cedar Grove is located on Route 23. The central business district starts at about Sweetwood Drive and extends to Little Falls Road just after the railroad bridge.

Industry[edit]

Although Cedar Grove is not known as an industrial town, the township has an industrial district located along Commerce Road, which is off Route 23. In this district, there are light industrial factories and different types of commercial businesses.

Transportation[edit]

The Cedar Grove station on the Caldwell Branch of the Erie Railroad, in 1909

Roads and highways[edit]

As of 2010, the township had a total of 47.09 miles (75.78 km) of roadways, of which 34.59 miles (55.67 km) were maintained by the municipality, 9.22 miles (14.84 km) by Essex County and 3.28 miles (5.28 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[82]

Route 23 bisects Cedar Grove, making the township conveniently located to major highways including Interstate 80, Interstate 280, U.S. Route 46, Route 3, and the Garden State Parkway. Cedar Grove is also centrally located to New York City, Newark, Paterson, and Morristown.

Public transportation[edit]

Cedar Grove is also served by New Jersey Transit bus service. The 11 and 75 bus lines provide service to Newark. The 195 bus line provides transportation to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan.[83]

Commuter train stations are located in the neighboring towns of Little Falls and Montclair. The Erie Railroad's Caldwell Branch ran between Little Falls and West Caldwell, but trains were sparsely scheduled and the line was destroyed in the 1970s.[84]

Local media[edit]

Newspaper[edit]

The Verona-Cedar Grove Times, a weekly newspaper that publishes every Thursday, serves Cedar Grove and Verona.

The Cedar Grove Observer, which publishes 50 weeks a year, serves Cedar Grove.

Internet[edit]

Local news is covered by the Cedar Grove Observer[85] and the Verona-Cedar Grove Times.[86]

Climate[edit]

Cedar Grove has a humid subtropical climate, with warm/hot humid summers and cool/cold winters. The climate is slightly colder overall during the summer and winter than in New York City because the urban heat island effect is not as prevalent.

January tends to be the coldest month, with average high temperatures in the upper 30s and low 40s and lows in the lower to mid 20s. July is the warmest months with high temperatures in the mid 80s and lows in the mid 60s. From April to June and from September to early November, Cedar Grove enjoys temperatures from the lower 60s to upper 70s. Rainfall is plentiful, with around 44 inches (1,100 mm) a year. Snowfall is common from mid January to early March and noreasters can bring a lot of snow. In January 1996, Cedar Grove received about record snowfall 3 feet (0.91 m) from the Blizzard of 1996.

Climate data for Cedar Grove, New Jersey
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 38.0
(3.3)
41.0
(5)
50.0
(10)
60.6
(15.9)
71.2
(21.8)
80.0
(26.7)
84.9
(29.4)
83.0
(28.3)
75.4
(24.1)
64.5
(18.1)
53.3
(11.8)
43.0
(6.1)
62.0
(16.7)
Average low °F (°C) 22.4
(−5.3)
24.5
(−4.2)
33.9
(1.1)
43.4
(6.3)
53.0
(11.7)
62.9
(17.2)
68.0
(20)
66.5
(19.2)
58.9
(14.9)
47.4
(8.6)
38.8
(3.8)
28.0
(−2.2)
45.8
(7.7)
Precipitation inches (mm) 3.98
(101.1)
2.96
(75.2)
4.21
(106.9)
3.92
(99.6)
4.46
(113.3)
3.40
(86.4)
4.68
(118.9)
4.02
(102.1)
4.01
(101.9)
3.16
(80.3)
3.88
(98.6)
3.57
(90.7)
46.25
(1,174.8)
Snowfall inches (cm) 8.9
(22.6)
8.4
(21.3)
4.3
(10.9)
.8
(2)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
.6
(1.5)
3.0
(7.6)
26.0
(66)
Avg. precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 10.5 9.9 10.9 10.8 11.7 10.7 10.0 9.6 9.0 8.3 9.5 10.7 121.6
Avg. snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 4.9 4.1 2.3 .4 0 0 0 0 0 0 .4 2.3 14.4
Source: NOAA[87]

Parks and recreation[edit]

Cedar Grove has several parks and recreational areas within the township. These include county parks, town parks, and recreational areas.

County parks[edit]

There are two county parks located in Cedar Grove.

  • Mills Reservation, a county park, consisting of a 157.15-acre (0.6360 km2) protected wooded area with trails for walking and an overlook of New York City.[88]
  • Hilltop Reservation, composed of lands in the grounds of the former Essex Mountain Sanitorium, opened in spring 2003.[89]

Parks[edit]

  • Community Park - this park is located near the center of the town off Little Falls Road. It features a baseball field, large field used for various sports, barbecue area, two playgrounds, a bocce court, and entrances to the Lenape Trails which are popular for running, walking and biking.
  • Elmer Bowden Taylor Memorial Park - this park and its recreational facilities is located on Little Falls Road; near Bowden Road. It includes tennis courts, basketball court, small playground, and public bathroom. Named after Elmer Bowden Taylor, Cedar Grove resident killed in action in World War I.
  • South End School Park, This park/playground is located on the grounds of South End Elementary School on Harper Terrace. Features include basketball courts, two baseball fields, and a playground.
  • North End School Park is nearly identical to South End School's park.
  • Cedar Grove High School, in the back of the high school, there is a quarter mile track for running or walking. There is also a football field, soccer field, and baseball field.

Recreational areas[edit]

  • Tennis Courts, there are various tennis courts located along Little Falls Road, all for public use.
  • Cedar Grove Community Pool, a community pool which opened in 1963. It features a large pool with 50 meter lanes and 25 meter lanes, three diving boards (two small and a large one), and a water slide. Also, there is a baby pool for children under five. There is a snack bar for refreshments, sun decks for sunbathing, and basketball courts. The pool is open from the Saturday before Memorial Day to Labor Day.[90]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Cedar Grove include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ [1], New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Council, Township of Cedar Grove. Accessed July 26, 2012.
  5. ^ Segedin, Andrew. "Changing of the guard: Cedar Grove appoints new mayor, deputy mayor", Verona-Cedar Grove News, July 2, 2012. Accessed November 4, 2012. "Peter Tanella, formerly the deputy mayor, was selected and sworn in as mayor.... Replacing him as deputy mayor is Robert O'Toole. Both appointments were effective immediately and will expire on July 1, 2013."
  6. ^ Township Manager, Township of Cedar Grove. Accessed October 8, 2013.
  7. ^ Municipal Clerk, Township of Cedar Grove. Accessed October 8, 2013.
  8. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 169.
  9. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Cedar Grove, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Census 2011: Essex County, Asbury Park Press. Accessed July 6, 2011.
  11. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Cedar Grove township, Essex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 26, 2012.
  12. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 16. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  13. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Cedar Grove township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 26, 2012.
  14. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  15. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 4, 2012.
  16. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Cedar Grove, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 26, 2012.
  17. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 8, 2013.
  18. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Cedar Grove, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 8, 2013.
  19. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  20. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 26, 2012.
  21. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  22. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 26, 2012.
  23. ^ "Best Places To Live - The Complete Top Towns List 1-100", New Jersey Monthly, February 21, 2008. Accessed February 24, 2008.
  24. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 126 re Cedar Grove, p. 132 re Verona.. Accessed July 26, 2012.
  25. ^ General Information, Township of Cedar Grove. Accessed July 6, 2011.
  26. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 8, 2013.
  27. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 336. Accessed November 4, 2012. Population for 1900 is for Verona Township as listed in footnote 11.
  28. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 716. Accessed July 26, 2012.
  29. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed July 26, 2012.
  30. ^ a b c d e f Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Cedar Grove township, Essex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 26, 2012.
  31. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Cedar Grove township, Essex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 26, 2012.
  32. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Cedar Grove township, Essex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 26, 2012.
  33. ^ Italian Communities, EPodunk. Accessed July 26, 2012.
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