Bloomfield, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Bloomfield, New Jersey
Township
Township of Bloomfield
Map of Bloomfield Township in Essex County. Inset: Location of Essex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Bloomfield Township in Essex County. Inset: Location of Essex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Bloomfield, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Bloomfield, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°48′33″N 74°11′14″W / 40.809128°N 74.187155°W / 40.809128; -74.187155Coordinates: 40°48′33″N 74°11′14″W / 40.809128°N 74.187155°W / 40.809128; -74.187155[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Essex
Incorporated March 23, 1812
Named for Joseph Bloomfield
Government[5]
 • Type Special Charter
 • Mayor Raymond J. McCarthy (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator Ted Ehrenburg[4]
 • Clerk Louise M. Palagano[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 5.328 sq mi (13.801 km2)
 • Land 5.304 sq mi (13.738 km2)
 • Water 0.024 sq mi (0.063 km2)  0.46%
Area rank 268th of 566 in state
7th of 22 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 174 ft (53 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 47,315
 • Estimate (2013[10]) 47,589
 • Rank 39th of 566 in state
4th of 22 in county[11]
 • Density 8,920.5/sq mi (3,444.2/km2)
 • Density rank 40th of 566 in state
6th of 22 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07003[12][13]
Area code(s) 862/973[14]
FIPS code 3401306260[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 1729714[17][2]
Website www.bloomfieldtwpnj.com

Bloomfield is a township in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 47,315,[7][8][9] reflecting a decline of 368 (-0.8%) from the 47,683 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 2,622 (+5.8%) from the 45,061 counted in the 1990 Census.[18] It surrounds the Bloomfield Green Historic District.

Silver Lake (2010 total population of 4,243[19]) is a census-designated place (CDP) and unincorporated area defined by the United States Census Bureau as of the 2010 Census that is split between Belleville (with 3,769 of the CDP's residents) and Bloomfield (474 of the total).[20] Brookdale (2010 population of 9,239[21]) is a CDP located entirely within Bloomfield.[20]

History[edit]

The Thomas Cadmus House was originally built in 1763 by Revolutionary War Lt. Col. Thomas Cadmus, and reconstructed in 1915 using the stones and foundation that had been used to build the original home. The house is at 223 Ashland Avenue (also known as 190 Washington Street) built on wooded land that been owned by his grandfather, Johannes Cadmus. General George Washington is said to have visited the home in 1778.[22]

Bloomfield was incorporated as a township from portions of Newark Township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 23, 1812.[23] The new township took its name from the Presbyterian parish, which had been named for Governor of New Jersey Joseph Bloomfield.[24]

At the time it was incorporated, the township covered 20.52 square miles (53.1 km2) (almost four times its current area of 5.3 square miles (14 km2)) and included several municipalities which were formed from portions of Bloomfield during the course of the nineteenth century, including Belleville (created on April 8, 1839), Montclair (April 15, 1868), Woodside Township (March 24, 1869) and Glen Ridge (February 13, 1895).[23][25]

Bloomfield was incorporated as a town on February 26, 1900.[23] In July 1981, residents voted to adopt the township form of government.[26]

Presbyterian Church, for which the township was named

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 5.328 square miles (13.801 km2), of which, 5.304 square miles (13.738 km2) of it was land and 0.024 square miles (0.063 km2) of it (0.46%) was water.[1][2] Bloomfield is located at 40°48′33″N 74°11′14″W / 40.809128°N 74.187155°W / 40.809128; -74.187155 (40.809128,-74.187155).

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1820 3,085
1830 4,309 39.7%
1840 2,528 * −41.3%
1850 3,385 33.9%
1860 4,790 41.5%
1870 4,580 * −4.4%
1880 5,748 25.5%
1890 7,708 34.1%
1900 9,668 * 25.4%
1910 15,070 55.9%
1920 22,019 46.1%
1930 38,077 72.9%
1940 41,623 9.3%
1950 49,307 18.5%
1960 51,867 5.2%
1970 52,029 0.3%
1980 47,792 −8.1%
1990 45,061 −5.7%
2000 47,683 5.8%
2010 47,315 −0.8%
Est. 2013 47,589 [10] 0.6%
Population sources:
1820-1920[27] 1820-1910[28]
1840[29] 1850-1870[30] 1850[31]
1870[32] 1870-1890[33] 1880-1890[34]
1890-1910[35] 1900-1930[36]
1930-1990[37] 2000[38][39] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory n previous decade.[23]

In comparison to the other municipalities in the U.S., the cost of living in Bloomfield was an average 24.01% higher than the U.S. average.[40]

According to a 2007 report from CNNMoney.com, the quality of life in Bloomfield in terms of crime are 3 incidents per 1,000 people as compared to the “best places to live average” of 1.3 incidents per 1,000. There were 35 property crime incidents per 1,000 people in Bloomfield as compared to the “best places to live average” of 20.6.[41]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 47,315 people, 18,387 households, and 11,768 families residing in the township. The population density was 8,920.5 per square mile (3,444.2 /km2). There were 19,470 housing units at an average density of 3,670.7 per square mile (1,417.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 59.61% (28,205) White, 18.51% (8,757) Black or African American, 0.41% (193) Native American, 8.22% (3,891) Asian, 0.04% (21) Pacific Islander, 9.35% (4,423) from other races, and 3.86% (1,825) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 24.53% (11,606) of the population.[7]

There were 18,387 households, of which 28.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.2% were married couples living together, 14.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.0% were non-families. 29.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.20.[7]

In the township, 21.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 30.9% from 25 to 44, 26.8% from 45 to 64, and 12.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.7 years. For every 100 females there were 89.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.4 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $62,831 (with a margin of error of +/- $2,641) and the median family income was $77,936 (+/- $4,120). Males had a median income of $51,498 (+/- $1,805) versus $44,735 (+/- $2,867) for females. The per capita income for the township was $30,421 (+/- $1,122). About 5.8% of families and 7.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.9% of those under age 18 and 7.9% of those age 65 or over.[42]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 47,683 people, 19,017 households, and 12,075 families residing in the township. The population density was 8,961.5 people per square mile (3,460.6/km2). There were 19,508 housing units at an average density of 3,666.3 per square mile (1,415.8/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 70.09% White, 11.69% Black, 0.19% Native American, 8.38% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 6.42% from other races, and 3.16% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 14.47% of the population.[38][39]

There were 19,017 households out of which 28.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.7% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.5% were non-families. 30.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.16.[38][39]

In the township the population was spread out with 21.1% under the age of 18, 8.4% from 18 to 24, 34.0% from 25 to 44, 22.3% from 45 to 64, and 14.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 90.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.1 males.[38][39]

The median income for a household in the township was $53,289, and the median income for a family was $64,945. Males had a median income of $43,498 versus $36,104 for females. The per capita income for the township was $26,049. About 4.4% of families and 5.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.3% of those under age 18 and 8.2% of those age 65 or over.[38][39]

Government[edit]

Rotunda of Town Hall

Local government[edit]

Bloomfield operates under a Special Charter granted under an Act of the New Jersey Legislature. The township is governed by a mayor and a six member Township Council. The mayor and three councilmembers are elected at large, and three members are elected from each of three wards, with all positions chosen in partisan elections. Councilmembers are elected to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one at-large and one ward seat coming up for election each year.[5] Bloomfield's charter retains most of the characteristics of the Town form, with additional powers delegated to an administrator.[43]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Bloomfield is Raymond J. McCarthy, whose term of office ends December 31, 2013. Members of the Bloomfield Township Council are Carlos Bernard (Third Ward), Elias N. Chalet (First Ward), Peggy O'Boyle Dunigan (at-large), Bernard Hamilton (at-large), Nicholas Joanow (Second Ward) and Michael Venezia (at-large).[4]

The township maintains its own police department.

Federal, state, and county representation[edit]

Bloomfield is split between the 10th and 11th Congressional districts[44] and is part of New Jersey's 28th state legislative district.[8][45][46] Prior to the 2010 Census, Bloomfield had been part of the 8th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[47] In the redistricting that went into effect in 2013, 24,480 residents in the northern portion of the township were placed in the 10th District, while 22,835 in the southern section were placed in the 11th District.[44][48]

New Jersey's Tenth Congressional District is represented by Donald Payne, Jr. (D, Newark).[49] New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).[50] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[51][52] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[53][54]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 28th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Ronald Rice (D, Newark) and in the General Assembly by Ralph R. Caputo (D, Belleville) and Cleopatra Tucker (D, Newark).[55][56] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[57] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[58]

Essex County is governed by a directly-elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by the Board of Chosen Freeholders.[59] As of 2014, the County Executive is Joseph N. DiVincenzo, Jr.[60] The county's Board of Chosen Freeholders consists of nine members, four elected on an at-large basis and one from each of five wards, who serve three-year terms of office on a concurrent basis, all of which end December 31, 2014.[59][61][62] Essex County's Freeholders are Freeholder President Blonnie R. Watson (at large; Newark)[63], Freeholder Vice President Patricia Sebold (at large; Livingston)[64], Rufus I. Johnson (at large; Newark)[65], Gerald W. Owens (At large; South Orange, filling the vacant seat after the resignation of Donald Payne, Jr.)[66] Rolando Bobadilla (District 1 - Newark's North and East Wards, parts of Central and West Wards; Newark)[67], D. Bilal Beasley (District 2 - Irvington, Maplewood and Newark's South Ward and parts of West Ward; Irvington)[68], Carol Y. Clark (District 3 - East Orange, Newark's West and Central Wards, Orange and South Orange; East Orange)[69] and Leonard M. Luciano (District 4 - Caldwell, Cedar Grove, Essex Fells, Fairfield, Livingston, Millburn, North Caldwell, Roseland, Verona, West Caldwell and West Orange; West Caldwell),[70] and Brendan W. Gill (District 5 - Belleville, Bloomfield, Glen Ridge, Montclair and Nutley; Montclair).[71][72][73] Constitutional elected countywide are County Clerk Christopher J. Durkin (West Caldwell, 2015),[74] Sheriff Armando B. Fontoura (2015)[75] and Surrogate Theodore N. Stephens, II (2016).[76][61][77]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 28,398 registered voters in Bloomfield, of which 11,925 (42.0%) were registered as Democrats, 4,393 (15.5%) were registered as Republicans and 12,061 (42.5%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 19 voters registered to other parties.[78]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 62.9% of the vote here (12,735 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 35.3% (7,154 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (186 votes), among the 20,251 ballots cast by the township's 27,981 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.4%.[79] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 57.0% of the vote here (10,829 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 41.5% (7,891 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (208 votes), among the 19,012 ballots cast by the township's 27,995 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 67.9.[80]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 53.8% of the vote here (6,241 ballots cast), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 37.6% (4,359 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 6.6% (761 votes) and other candidates with 1.3% (147 votes), among the 11,599 ballots cast by the township's 27,929 registered voters, yielding a 41.5% turnout.[81]

Education[edit]

Primary and secondary schools[edit]

Public schools[edit]

Essex Junior Academy

The Bloomfield Public Schools serve students in prekindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[82]) are eight elementary schools serving kindergarten through sixth grade — Berkeley School (425 students) Brookdale School[83] (303), Carteret School[84] (425), Demarest School[85] (502), Fairview School[86] (480), Franklin School[87] (383), Oak View School[88] (331), Watsessing School[89] (296) — Bloomfield Middle School[90] for grades 7 and 8 (945), and Bloomfield High School[91] for grades 9-12 (1,824), while Bridges Academy at Forest Glen[92] provides individualized programs and services to special needs students in grades 7-12 (36 students).[93][94]

As of the 2011-12 school year, the Bloomfield Public Schools had a Budgetary Per Pupil Cost of $12,001 (vs. a statewide group average was $13,738), while Total Spending Per Pupil for the district was $15,699 (vs. $18,006 statewide).[95][96]

Bloomfield Tech High School is a regional magnet public high school that offers occupational and academic instruction for students in Essex County, as part of the Essex County Vocational Technical Schools.[97]

Catholic schools[edit]

Saint Thomas the Apostle Parish School, which serves grades K-8, is operated under the supervision of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark.[98][99]

Colleges and universities[edit]

Bloomfield College, a liberal arts college founded in 1868, is located in downtown Bloomfield near the town green. The college has approximately 2,000 students and is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church.[100]

Transportation[edit]

Roadway[edit]

The major New Jersey highway artery that serves Bloomfield is the Garden State Parkway, the longest road in the state. It has four interchanges in the township. Interchanges 148 in the south of Bloomfield and 151 in the north are complete interchanges, while 149 and 150 are partials. The Parkway's Essex toll plaza is southbound just south of interchange 150 in the township. There are two service areas on the Parkway in Bloomfield, one for northbound and one southbound. Troop E of the New Jersey State Police, which patrols the full length of the Garden State Parkway, has a station in Bloomfield at northbound milepost 153.[101]

County roads 506, 506 Spur, and 509 serve Bloomfield.

Commuter Rail[edit]

South Bloomfield is served by 2 stations of the New Jersey Transit Montclair-Boonton Line to Hoboken Terminal or to Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan via the Secaucus Junction. About 55% of the weekday trains terminate in Penn Station via Midtown Direct. On weekends the line terminates in Hoboken. The Bloomfield train station is located off of Bloomfield Avenue in the downtown area. The Watsessing Avenue rail station is at the corner of Watsessing Avenue and Orange Street, and is located below ground.

Bloomfield used to be served by other passenger rail lines. The Rowe Street Station was served by the Boonton Line until 2002. The Walnut Street station, on the same line, was closed in 1953 when the Garden State Parkway was built through it.

Light Rail[edit]

The Grove Street station on the Newark City Subway line of the Newark Light Rail at the south end of Bloomfield provides service to Newark Penn Station, created as part of an extension to Belleville and Bloomfield that opened in 2002.[102] This station was part of the Orange Branch of the New York & Greenwood Lake Service of the Erie Railroad with service to Jersey City which last saw service in 1955.

Buses[edit]

New Jersey Transit bus service is available to and from Newark on the 11, 27, 28, 29, 34, 72, 90, 92, 93 and 94 routes, with local service on the 709 bus line.[103] In October 2009, the Go Bus 28 route was introduced, offering service "nearly" all day from Bloomfield Train Station to Newark Liberty International Airport.[104][105]

Airports[edit]

Bloomfield is 7.5 miles (12.1 km) from Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark / Elizabeth, and 28.8 miles (46.3 km) from LaGuardia Airport in Flushing, Queens.

Downtown office building

Parks and recreation[edit]

Brookdale Park, established in 1928, covers over 121.42 acres (49.14 ha) in Bloomfield and Montclair, making it the county's third-largest park, 77.42 acres (31.33 ha) are in Bloomfield.[106] Watsessing Park, which is the county's fourth largest park, covers 69.67 acres (28.19 ha) split between Bloomfield and East Orange (60 acres (24 ha) in Bloomfield), and features sections of the Second River and Toney's Brook flowing through the park.[107] Both parks are administered by the Essex County Department of Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Affairs.

The Bloomfield Parks & Recreation Department administers 8 parks with 55.23 acres (22.35 ha).

Points of interest[edit]

Notable events[edit]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Bloomfield include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ a b c List of Township Officials, Township of Bloomfield. Accessed August 26, 2013.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 128.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Bloomfield, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 4, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Bloomfield township, Essex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 28, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 13. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Bloomfield township, Essex County, New Jersey, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed January 28, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Bloomfield, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 7, 2011.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 26, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Bloomfield, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Retrieved September 29, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed September 29, 2012.
  19. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Silver Lake - Essex CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 4, 2012.
  20. ^ a b New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, August 2012, p. III-3. Accessed November 4, 2012. "Silver Lake (formed from parts of deleted whole-township Belleville and Bloomfield CDPs)"
  21. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Brookdale CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 4, 2012.
  22. ^ Thomas Cadmus House, Bloomfield History. Accessed July 18, 2011.
  23. ^ a b c d Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 126. Accessed January 28, 2012.
  24. ^ Bloomfield, New Jersey - A Brief History, First Baptist Church of Bloomfield, NJ. Retrieved August 21, 2007.
  25. ^ A Brief History of Bloomfield. Retrieved June 16, 2006.
  26. ^ Bloomfield, New Jersey - A Brief History, First Baptist Church of Bloomfield. Accessed July 6, 2007. "In July of 1981, by a special election, it changed its designation to 'Township' again."
  27. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 25, 2013.
  28. ^ Folsom, Joseph Fulford. Bloomfield, Old and New: An Historical Symposium, p. 145. Centennial Historical Committee, 1912. Accessed November 4, 2012.
  29. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed July 25, 2013.
  30. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 241, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 25, 2013. "Bloomfield township is five miles long by three wide, On its north is Acqackannonck, Passaic county, Belleville and the city of Newark on the east, Orange on the south, and Montclair and Orange on the west. On the Second and Third rivers, there are numerous manufacturing establishments. The population in 1850 was 3,385; in 1860, 4,790; and in 1870, 4,580. The village of the same name extends about three and a half miles in a northwesterly direction, including West Bloomfield. It was settled in the early part of the colony by New Englanders."
  31. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 138. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed July 25, 2013.
  32. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 259. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed July 25, 2013.
  33. ^ Salisbury, Rollin D. The Physical Geography of New Jersey: Volume IV. of the Final Report of the State Geologist, p. 157. Trenton, New Jersey, The John L. Murphy Publishing Company, 1898. Accessed November 4, 2012.
  34. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed July 25, 2013.
  35. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 336. Accessed September 29, 2012.
  36. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 710. Accessed January 28, 2012.
  37. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed January 28, 2012.
  38. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Bloomfield township, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 29, 2012.
  39. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Bloomfield township, Essex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 29, 2012.
  40. ^ "Best Places to Live in Bloomfield, New Jersey". Bestplaces.net. Retrieved 2010-05-18. 
  41. ^ "MONEY Magazine: Best places to live 2007: Bloomfield, NJ snapshot". Money.cnn.com. 2010-04-22. Retrieved 2010-05-18. 
  42. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Bloomfield township, Essex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 28, 2012.
  43. ^ Chapter V: Special Charters, New Jersey State Library. Retrieved August 7, 2008.
  44. ^ a b Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  45. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 55, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  46. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  47. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 55, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  48. ^ New Jersey Congressional Districts 2012-2012: Bloomfield Map, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  49. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  50. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  51. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  52. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  53. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  54. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  55. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 19, 2014.
  56. ^ District 28 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 19, 2014.
  57. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  58. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  59. ^ a b General Information, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014. "The Board of Chosen Freeholders consists of nine members, five of whom are elected from districts and four of whom are elected at-large. They are elected for three-year concurrent terms and may be re-elected to successive terms at the annual election in November."
  60. ^ Essex County Executive, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  61. ^ a b Essex County Elected Officials, Essex County Clerk, as of February 2012. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  62. ^ Definition of a Freeholder, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  63. ^ Blonnie R. Watson, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  64. ^ Patricia Sebold, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  65. ^ Rufus I. Johnson, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  66. ^ Lee, Eunice. "Labor leader from South Orange tapped as new Essex County freeholder", The Star-Ledger, December 19, 2012. Accessed July 9, 2014. "A longtime labor union leader from South Orange was sworn in this afternoon as the newest Essex County freeholder.Gerald Owens, 74, is a general organizer for the International Longshoremen's Association.... Owens is filling the seat vacated by former at-large freeholder Donald Payne Jr., who stepped down from the post last month after securing the 10th Congressional District seat left open by his late father."
  67. ^ Rolando Bobadilla, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  68. ^ D. Bilal Beasley, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  69. ^ Carol Y. Clark, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  70. ^ Leonard M. Luciano, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  71. ^ Brendan W. Gill, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  72. ^ The Board of Chosen Freeholders, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  73. ^ Breakdown of Freeholder Districts, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  74. ^ About Christopher J. Durkin, Essex County Clerk. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  75. ^ Armando B. Fontoura - Essex County Sheriff, Essex County Sheriff's Office. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  76. ^ Office of Surrogate, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  77. ^ County Directory, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  78. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Essex, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  79. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Essex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  80. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Essex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  81. ^ 2009 Governor: Essex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  82. ^ School Data for the Bloomfield Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved September 29, 2012.
  83. ^ Brookdale School, Bloomfield Public Schools. Accessed August 26, 2013.
  84. ^ Carteret School, Bloomfield Public Schools. Accessed August 26, 2013.
  85. ^ Demarest School, Bloomfield Public Schools. Accessed August 26, 2013.
  86. ^ Fairview School, Bloomfield Public Schools. Accessed August 26, 2013.
  87. ^ Franklin School, Bloomfield Public Schools. Accessed August 26, 2013.
  88. ^ Oak View School, Bloomfield Public Schools. Accessed August 26, 2013.
  89. ^ Watsessing School, Bloomfield Public Schools. Accessed August 26, 2013.
  90. ^ Bloomfield Middle School, Bloomfield Public Schools. Accessed August 26, 2013.
  91. ^ Bloomfield High School, Bloomfield Public Schools. Accessed August 26, 2013.
  92. ^ Bridges Academy at Forest Glen, Bloomfield Public Schools. Accessed August 26, 2013.
  93. ^ Schools, Bloomfield Public Schools. Accessed August 26, 2013.
  94. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Bloomfield Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 25, 2013.
  95. ^ Taxpayers' Guide to Education Spending 2013 for Bloomfield Twp (0410), New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 26, 2013.
  96. ^ Taxpayers' Guide to Education Spending 2013 for Enrollment Group: G. K-12 / 3501 +, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 26, 2013.
  97. ^ About Us, Bloomfield Tech High School. Accessed July 18, 2011.
  98. ^ About Us, Saint Thomas the Apostle Parish School. Accessed July 25, 2013.
  99. ^ Essex County schools, Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark. Accessed July 18, 2011.
  100. ^ At a glance, Bloomfield College. Accessed July 18, 2011. "Bloomfield College is an independent, four-year, coeducational college, affiliated with Presbyterian Church (USA), founded in 1868.... Enrollment: About 2,000 students are enrolled at Bloomfield College either full or part time, with more than 50 nationalities represented on campus."
  101. ^ Troop E, New Jersey State Police. Accessed July 18, 2011.
  102. ^ Staff. "Subway extension to open in summer, Newark officials hope that the $207.7 million downtown project will help spur a renaissance.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, February 13, 2006. Accessed July 18, 2011. "The last major expansion of the 4.3mile subway in 2002 brought the service into the neighboring cities of Belleville and Bloomfield."
  103. ^ Essex County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed July 18, 2011.
  104. ^ NJ TRANSIT UNVEILS NEW "GO BUS 28" SERVICE IN NEWARK AND BLOOMFIELDEnhanced bus service begins October 17, linking residents with major employment centers, New Jersey Transit press release dated October 16, 2009. Accessed July 18, 2011. "NJ TRANSIT and local officials today previewed the second phase of “Go Bus” service—an enhanced bus service that will provide a faster, more convenient trip between Bloomfield, downtown Newark and Newark Liberty International Airport when Go Bus 28 begins operating Saturday, October 17."
  105. ^ Go Bus 28 (Bloomfield - Newark - Newark Airport), New Jersey Transit. Accessed July 18, 2011. "Go bus 28 provides fast, convenient service along two of northern New Jersey's busiest corridors between the cities of Bloomfield and Newark, Bloomfield Avenue and Broad Street."
  106. ^ Brookdale Park, Essex County Department of Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Affairs. Accessed November 4, 2012.
  107. ^ Watsessing Park, Essex County Department of Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Affairs. Accessed November 4, 2012.
  108. ^ Caldwell, Dave. "Ice Cream, Onion Rings and Tony Soprano", The New York Times, August 26, 2007. Accessed November 4, 2012. "Holsten’s is the site of the last scene of the 86th and final episode of “The Sopranos.” Tony Soprano, the fictitious mob boss, meets his family there for dinner. Then, as strangers lurk in the background, the screen goes black."
  109. ^ History, Oakside Bloomfield Cultural Center. Accessed April 19, 2012.
  110. ^ Walsh, John (19 June 1981). "A Manhattan Project Postscript". Science (AAAS) 212: 1369–1371. ISSN 0036-8075. Retrieved 6 March 2014. 
  111. ^ Bonk, Thomas. "NCAA BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT Duke's Abdelnaby Is Driven Blue Devils: After three inconsistent seasons and some off-court difficulties, the center has finally established himself heading into his biggest games.", Los Angeles Times, March 30, 1990. Accessed August 11, 2008. "Playing for Coach Paul Palek at Bloomfield High School, [Alaa Abdelnaby] yearned for a chance at the NBA. Palek, now assistant principal at Glen Ridge High School in New Jersey, thought the sky was the limit for Abdelnaby."
  112. ^ David Mark Chalmers (1987). Hooded Americanism: The History of the Ku Klux Klan. ISBN 0-8223-0772-3. "Clad in yellow robes, Arthur H. Bell, the Bloomfield lawyer, who had led the New Jersey Klansmen in the 1920s ..." 
  113. ^ Goldstein, Richard. "Hank Borowy, 88, Top Pitcher With Yankees and Cubs in 40's", The New York Times, August 26, 2004. Accessed April 19, 2012. "Borowy, a native of Bloomfield, N.J., who pitched for Fordham University, was 15-4 as a rookie on the Yankees' 1942 pennant winners."
  114. ^ Fox, Richard Wrightman. "Apostle of Personality", The New York Times, January 13, 1985. Accessed June 5, 2011. "Bourne, who was born and raised in Bloomfield, N.J., went to Columbia College on full scholarship at the age of 23 and was on his way to major distinction as a critic of culture and politics when he was suddenly silenced nine years later by the flu epidemic of 1918, which killed half a million Americans."
  115. ^ Murphy, Maureen Clare. "All Boxed In: Interview with Palestinian-American artist Rajie Cook", The Electronic Intifada, January 12, 2005. Accessed September 8, 2013.
  116. ^ Biography, Rajie Cook. Accessed September 8, 2013.
  117. ^ Assemblywoman Marion Crecco, New Jersey Legislature, backed up by the Internet Archive as of February 25, 1998. Accessed June 2, 2010.
  118. ^ David, Peter. "But I Digress", Comics Buyer's Guide #1251. November 7, 1997. Page 90
  119. ^ David, Peter (September 11, 2012). "Peter David, Agent 008". peterdavid.net. Originally published in "But I Digress...", Comics Buyer's Guide #1257 (December 19, 1997).
  120. ^ Mabel Eden's Diary, The Life of a Lady
  121. ^ Staff. "CHARLES W. EATON, PAINTER, IS DEAD; Won Many Awards for His Landscapes--Succumbs in Glen Ridge at 81; DUSK SCENES A SPECIALTY; Received Philadelphia Art Club Medal in 1903--Honored in Paris Three Years Later", The New York Times, September 12, 1937. Accessed August 3, 2011. "Mr. Eaton, who was 81 years old, had lived in Bloomfield for fifty years.... Burial will be in the Bloomfield Cemetery. "
  122. ^ Studio Tour with Todd Edwards, Scion Audio/Visual. Accessed November 4, 2012. "House music honcho Todd Edwards shows off his recording studio in Bloomfield, NJ."
  123. ^ Stewart, Phil. "Running Times' 1979 Boston Marathon Coverage", Running Times, July 1979. Accessed November 7, 2011. "The frontrunner this year (as last year) was twice-runnerup Tom Fleming of Bloomfield, NJ, whose race strategy was simple: "I just figured to run as fast as I could for as long as I could, and see if they could catch me." For the first half of the race, nobody even tried."
  124. ^ Esterow, Milton. "Connie Francis at Copacabana; Queen of the Young 'Singers a 'Natural' -- Dion in Debut", The New York Times, May 20, 1961. Accessed January 14, 2009. "The queen, of course, is Connie Francis, 22 years old, 5 feet 1, dark-haired, formerly of Brooklyn and now of Bloomfield, N. J."
  125. ^ Litsky, Frank. "Johnny Gibson, 101, Track Coach With a Long Legacy, Is Dead", The New York Times, January 1, 2007. Accessed June 5, 2008. "Gibson was 5 when his father died, and he attended Bloomfield (N.J.) High School and then Fordham at night, working days running messages on Wall Street (he actually ran from building to building)."
  126. ^ Owen, Seth. "Saving local music", copy of article from The Enterprise (Brockton), April 11, 2002. Accessed April 11, 2011.
  127. ^ Lomax, John Nova. "Gang of New Jersey: Ted Leo and the Pharmacists mingle rampant Europhilia with American Girl", The Village Voice, April 16, 2007. Accessed December 25, 2007. "Bloomfield, Leo's hometown, is just west of New York City and just north of Newark."
  128. ^ Orr, Conor. "Bloomfield native Bob Ley will be the face of the World Cup for ESPN", The Star-Ledger, June 9, 2010. Accessed July 18, 2011. "Unfortunately for Bob Ley, he was the first of the two team managers to show up at Bloomfield High’s soccer practice on that fall afternoon in 1971. His best friend and co-manager Bob Longo disagrees on the circumstances, but remembers vividly the sight of the future ESPN anchor in a compromising position after the team’s players stuffed Ley into the wire equipment cart and rolled him straight into the pond near the field."
  129. ^ LaGorce, Tammy. "IN PERSON; Independently Unwealthy", The New York Times, February 13, 2005. Accessed November 4, 2012. "'People tell me I'm shooting myself in the foot, releasing so much -- I've heard that for years,' Mr. Moore said in a confessional tone over a cheeseburger at a downtown tavern here in Bloomfield, where he lives."
  130. ^ Staff. Capt. Charles A. Morris", The New York Times, March 10, 1914. Accessed September 16, 2013. "Capt. Charles A. Morris of Bloomfield, N. J., consulting engineer of the Haywood Construction Company of New York, died Sunday in Los Gatos, Cal., in the sixty-second year of his age."
  131. ^ Chval, Craig. "Catching Up With ... Frank And Kelly Tripuka", CSTV, November 18, 2005. Accessed April 10, 2008. "Among the most prominent and successful was Bloomfield, N.J., native Frank Tripucka, a quarterback on Leahy's legendary teams of the 1940s. Tripucka earned monograms as a backup to Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Lujack on Notre Dame's unbeaten 1946 and 1947 teams before winning the starting role in 1948."
  132. ^ "SPORTS PEOPLE: BASKETBALL; Tripucka Is a Net, Sort Of", The New York Times, June 20, 1992. Accessed January 23, 2012. "Playing for the Nets would be a double homecoming of sorts for Tripucka, who grew up in Bloomfield, N.J., and played four seasons under the new Nets coach, CHUCK DALY, when both were with the Detroit Pistons."
  133. ^ [1]
  134. ^ Dick Zimmer (R), The Cook Political Report. Accessed January 23, 2012. "Dick Zimmer was born in Newark and grew up in the New Jersey towns of Hillside, Bloomfield, and Glen Ridge."

External links[edit]