2C-Se

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2C-Se
2C-SE-Chemdraw.png
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
2-[2,5-Dimethoxy-4-(methylselanyl)phenyl]ethan-1-amine
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C11H17NO2Se/c1-13-9-7-11(15-3)10(14-2)6-8(9)4-5-12/h6-7H,4-5,12H2,1-3H3
    Key: CXQUHXATPUFGMC-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • NCCc1cc(OC)c(cc1OC)[Se]C
Properties
C11H17NO2Se
Molar mass 274.218 g/mol
Melting point 240–241 °C (464–466 °F; 513–514 K)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

2C-Se is a lesser-known psychedelic drug. It was originally named by Alexander Shulgin as described in his book PiHKAL (Phenethylamines i Have Known And Loved). Shulgin considered 2C-Se to be around three times the potency of mescaline,[1][2][3][4] but was too concerned about toxicity to test it extensively, though he considered it noteworthy as the only psychedelic drug to contain a selenium atom.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Alexander Shulgin; Tania Manning; Paul F Daley (2011). The Shulgin Index. Volume 1. Psychedelic Phenethylamines and Related Compounds. Transform Press. p. 346. ISBN 978-0-9630096-3-0.
  2. ^ Shulgin AT. Basic Pharmacology and Effects. In Hallucinogens. A Forensic Drug Handbook. Academic Press, 2003. ISBN 978-0124339514
  3. ^ Daniel Trachsel; David Lehmann & Christoph Enzensperger (2013). Phenethylamine: Von der Struktur zur Funktion. Nachtschatten Verlag AG. pp. 801–802. ISBN 978-3-03788-700-4.
  4. ^ Jacob P, Shulgin AT. Structure-activity relationships of the classic hallucinogens and their analogs. In Hallucinogens: An update. pp 74–91. NIDA Research Monograph 146. NIH Publication 94-3872, 1994.
  5. ^ Shulgin, Alexander; Shulgin, Ann (September 1991). PiHKAL: A Chemical Love Story. Berkeley, California: Transform Press. ISBN 0-9630096-0-5. OCLC 25627628.

External links[edit]