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Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

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Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
Once Upon a Time in Hollywood poster.png
Theatrical release poster
Directed byQuentin Tarantino
Produced by
Written byQuentin Tarantino
Starring
Narrated byKurt Russell
CinematographyRobert Richardson
Edited byFred Raskin[1]
Production
company
Distributed bySony Pictures Releasing
Release date
  • May 21, 2019 (2019-05-21) (Cannes)
  • July 26, 2019 (2019-07-26) (United States)
  • August 14, 2019 (2019-08-14) (United Kingdom)
Running time
161 minutes[2]
Country
  • United States
  • United Kingdom
LanguageEnglish
Budget$90–96 million[3]
Box office$183.6 million[4][5]

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood[a] is a 2019 comedy-drama film written and directed by Quentin Tarantino. Produced by Columbia Pictures, Bona Film Group, Heyday Films, and Visiona Romantica and distributed by Sony Pictures Releasing, it is an international co-production between the United States and the United Kingdom. The film stars Leonardo DiCaprio, Brad Pitt, Margot Robbie, Emile Hirsch, Margaret Qualley, Timothy Olyphant, Austin Butler, Dakota Fanning, Bruce Dern, and Al Pacino. They are part of a large ensemble cast who star in "multiple storylines in a modern fairy tale tribute to the final moments of Hollywood's golden age".[6][7] The film is set in 1969 Los Angeles, where an aging television actor and his stunt double and longtime friend navigate the changing Hollywood film industry.[8]

Announced in July 2017, it is the first Tarantino film not associated with producer Harvey Weinstein, after Tarantino cut ties following sexual abuse allegations against Weinstein that October. Sony Pictures won the distribution rights, having met several of Tarantino's demands including final cut privilege. Pitt, DiCaprio, and Robbie, and Tarantino regulars such as Zoë Bell and Kurt Russell joined the cast between January and June 2018. Principal photography lasted from that June through November around Los Angeles. It is the last film to feature Luke Perry, who died in March 2019.

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood had its world premiere at the Cannes Film Festival on May 21, 2019, and was theatrically released in the United States on July 26, 2019 and in the United Kingdom on August 14, 2019. The Hollywood Reporter wrote that critics had "an overall positive view" of the film, calling it "Tarantino's love letter to '60s L.A." and praising its casting choices and setting, though some were "divided on its ending".[9]

Plot

In February 1969, Hollywood actor Rick Dalton, former star of 1950s Western television series Bounty Law, fears his career is over. Casting agent Marvin Schwarz advises him to make Spaghetti Westerns, which Dalton feels is beneath him. Dalton's friend and stunt double, Cliff Booth a war veteran who lives in a trailer with his pit bull, Brandy drives Dalton around town. Booth has had no film work since the death of his wife; he is rumored to have murdered her. Meanwhile, actress Sharon Tate and her husband, director Roman Polanski, have moved into the house next door to Dalton's. Dalton dreams of befriending the couple to restore his status. That night, Tate and Polanski join Jay Sebring at a celebrity-filled party at the Playboy Mansion.

At Dalton's house, Booth reminisces about a sparring match he had on the set of The Green Hornet with Bruce Lee. Charles Manson stops by the home of Polanski and Tate looking for record producer Terry Melcher, who used to live there, but is turned away by Sebring. While driving Dalton's car, Booth picks up a young hitchhiker, Pussycat. He drops her off at Spahn Ranch, where Booth once filmed Bounty Law. Booth is suspicious of the large number of hippies squatting on the property, and suspects they are taking advantage of the owner, George Spahn. Booth insists on checking on Spahn despite objections from Squeaky. Spahn dismisses Booth's fears. Returning to the car, Booth discovers that Clem Grogan has slashed a tire; Booth beats him and forces him to change it. One of the girls, Sundance, fetches Tex Watson, but by the time Watson arrives on horseback Booth is driving away. Tate goes for a walk and decides to stop at a movie theater to watch herself in The Wrecking Crew.

Dalton lands the role of a villain in the pilot episode of a new series, Lancer, and strikes up a conversation with his eight-year-old co-star, Trudi Fraser. During one scene, Dalton, hungover, struggles with his dialogue. After having a breakdown in his trailer, Dalton returns to the set and delivers a powerful performance that impresses the director, Sam Wanamaker, and Fraser, bolstering Dalton's confidence. After watching Dalton's guest performance on an episode of The F.B.I., Schwarz books Dalton to star as the lead of Sergio Corbucci's next Western, Nebraska Jim. Dalton takes Booth with him for a six-month stint in Europe, during which he appears in two additional Westerns and a Eurospy comedy, and marries Italian starlet Francesca Capucci.

Returning to Los Angeles, Dalton informs Booth he can no longer afford his services, and they agree to go their separate ways. They go out for drinks and return to Dalton's home, where Booth smokes an acid-laced cigarette and takes Brandy for a walk. Meanwhile, Watson, Susan Atkins, Linda Kasabian, and Patricia Krenwinkel park outside in preparation to murder everyone in Tate's house. Dalton hears the car and angrily orders them to leave. The group decides to kill Dalton instead, after Atkins reasons that Hollywood "taught them to murder", but Kasabian deserts them. They break into Dalton's house and confront Booth, who recognizes them from Spahn Ranch. Booth orders Brandy to attack, and together they kill Krenwinkel and Watson and severely injure Atkins. Atkins, gun in hand, stumbles outside, alarming Dalton, who was listening to music on headphones, oblivious to the mayhem. He retrieves a flamethrower kept from a film shoot and incinerates Atkins. The injured Booth is taken to the hospital. Sebring engages Dalton in conversation and Tate invites Dalton over for drinks with her houseguests, Sebring, Abigail Folger and Wojciech Frykowski.

Cast

Additionally, Tim Roth, James Marsden, and Danny Strong shot scenes for the film but are not included in the theatrical release. Roth portrayed Jay Sebring's English butler, Marsden portrayed Burt Reynolds, and Danny Strong portrayed Dean Martin.[46][47][48][49] Toni Basil, who choreographed the movie, has an uncredited cameo in a dance scene in the lounge of a Pan Am jetliner.[50]

Production

Pre-production

On July 11, 2017, it was announced that Quentin Tarantino had written a screenplay for a film about the Manson Family murders, which he would direct as his next project. Harvey and Bob Weinstein would be involved but it was not known whether their studio, The Weinstein Company, would distribute the film as Tarantino sought to cast the film before sending out a package to studios. Brad Pitt and Jennifer Lawrence were revealed to be two names Tarantino had approached to star in the film.[51] On the same day, it was separately reported that Margot Robbie was in talks to potentially portray actress Sharon Tate, Samuel L. Jackson was also in talks to portray a major role, and that Pitt was in talks to portray the detective investigating the murders.[52]

In the wake of the Harvey Weinstein sexual abuse allegations, Tarantino severed his ties with producer Weinstein and sought a new distributor, after having worked with Weinstein for his entire career. At this point, Leonardo DiCaprio was revealed to be among a short list of actors Tarantino was considering for the film.[53] A short time later, there were reports that the studios were still bidding for the film set in Los Angeles in the late 1960s and early 1970s, that Tom Cruise was also in talks for one of two lead male roles, and David Heyman had joined the film as a producer, who would produce along with Tarantino and Shannon McIntosh.[54] On November 11, 2017, Sony Pictures announced they would be distributing the film, having beaten Warner Bros., Universal Pictures, Paramount Pictures, Annapurna Pictures and Lionsgate for the rights.[55] To secure the rights to distribute the film, Sony Pictures had to agree to Tarantino's demands, which included "a $95 million production budget, final cut and 'extraordinary creative controls'", plus 25% of first-dollar gross.[56] Another demand was that the rights to the movie revert to him after 10 to 20 years.[57] During a publicity interview by The Hollywood Reporter, Margot Robbie, when inquired about her potential involvement in the Tarantino-helmed film, noted that "Nothing's official (...) but I would kill to work with him."[58]

Casting

In January 2018, DiCaprio signed to star in the film, taking a pay cut to collaborate with Tarantino again.[59][60] It was also revealed that Al Pacino was being eyed for a role.[61] On February 28, 2018, the film was officially titled Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, with Pitt cast in the role Cruise was also up for.[62] DiCaprio and Pitt were each paid $10 million for their work in the film.[63] In March 2018, Robbie signed to co-star in the film as Sharon Tate, while Zoë Bell confirmed that she would also appear in the film.[64][65][66] In April 2018, Jessica Lange was in talks to play Mary Alice Schwarz but she dropped out and Brenda Vaccaro replaced her. In May 2018, Burt Reynolds, Tim Roth, Kurt Russell, and Michael Madsen joined the cast with the latter three in small roles.[67] Timothy Olyphant was also cast.[68] In June 2018, Damian Lewis, Luke Perry, Emile Hirsch, Dakota Fanning, Clifton Collins Jr., Keith Jefferson, Nicholas Hammond, Pacino, and Scoot McNairy joined the cast.[69][70][71]

Additional casting which included the additions of Spencer Garrett, James Remar, Brenda Vaccaro, and Mike Moh was announced in July.[72] In August 2018, additional castings were made, including Damon Herriman as Charles Manson, and Lena Dunham, Austin Butler, Danny Strong, Rumer Willis, Dreama Walker, and Margaret Qualley cast in supporting roles.[73][74][75][76]

Principal photography began on June 18, 2018, in Los Angeles, California, and wrapped on November 1, 2018.[77][78] Reynolds died in September 2018 before filming any of his scenes; Bruce Dern was cast as George Spahn in his place.[34]

Pop culture references

Archive footage from many films is included in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, including C.C. and Company, Lady in Cement, Three in the Attic, and The Wrecking Crew, in which Sharon Tate appears as Freya Carlson, as well as audio from Batman. There are three additional scenes that appear but are digitally altered in order to replace the original actors with Rick Dalton. One is from an episode of The F.B.I., entitled "All the Streets Are Silent," in which Dalton appears as a character portrayed by Burt Reynolds in the episode. The second is from Death on the Run, in which Dalton's face is imposed over Ty Hardin's, and the third is from The Great Escape, in which Dalton appears as Virgil Hilts, the role made famous by Steve McQueen.[79][80][81]

Many famous Los Angeles area locations appear throughout the film, including the Fox Westwood Theater, the Fox Bruin Theater, the Cinerama Dome, El Coyote Cafe, the Musso & Frank Grill, and the Playboy Mansion. Corriganville Movie Ranch appears as well, which stands in for Spahn Ranch. Cliff Booth's trailer is located next to the Van Nuys Drive-In Theater.[82][29]

Rick Dalton's 1966 Cadillac de Ville is the same exact car driven by Vic Vega aka Mr. Blonde in Reservoir Dogs. It is owned by actor Michael Madsen, who portrayed Mr. Blonde. The 1959 Ford Galaxie driven by the Manson Family in the film is a detailed replica of the actual car used in the Tate/La Bianca murders. Car coordinator Steven Butcher was able to find the actual car used in the murders. He had a meeting with Tarantino about using it and they decided not to because it would be too creepy to have it on set.[83]

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood is filled with many references to the world of entertainment. The title itself is a reference to Once Upon a Time in the West and Once Upon a Time in America, both directed by Sergio Leone. Rick Dalton makes films with directors, Sergio Corbucci and Antonio Margheriti. A scene from Dalton's film The 14 Fists of McCluskey, where his character burns Nazis with a flamethrower is a reference to Quentin Tarantino's Inglourious Basterds. In a scene where Sharon Tate goes into a Larry Edmunds Bookshop, she purchases a copy of Tess of the D'Urbervilles. Roman Polanski directed the film adaptation of the book, entitled Tess, and dedicated it to Tate. In the bookstore there is a replica of the Maltese Falcon. The song being sung by members of the Manson Family on the streets of L.A. is "I'll Never Say Never To Always", which was written by Charles Manson. There is a cover of an issue of Mad Magazine featuring Jake Cahill, Dalton's character in Bounty Law. When Cliff Booth is visiting George Spahn, and tells Spahn his name, Spahn responds, "John Wilkes who"?, a reference to John Wilkes Booth.[81][29]

Morey Amsterdam and Rose Marie are mentioned by Allen Kincaid as his guests on his TV program next week. Sam Wanamaker mentions The Big Valley and Bonanza when speaking to Rick Dalton. There is an ad on a bus for Combat! and a bus bench ads for Hobo Kelly and George Putnam. A poster for The Golden Stallion hangs on Dalton's wall. Ron Ely is mentioned by Dalton and Marvin Schwarz, who also mentions Mannix. Robert Goulet is seen singing "MacArthur Park" on TV. Ads on the radio include one for The Illustrated Man and one for Helena Rubinstein's perfume, Heaven Sent. Dalton compares Tex Watson to Dennis Hopper. Dalton appears on Hullabaloo. An issue of Kid Colt Outlaw appears in Cliff Booth's trailer. Dalton is said to have appeared in an episode of Land of the Giants. Randy mentions Andrew V. McLaglen. The Night They Raided Minsky's Romeo and Juliet are listed on the marquee of a movie theater. George Peppard, George Maharis, and George Chakiris are mentioned by Dalton. Tate mentions that The Doors are cooler than Paul Revere and the Raiders. John Wayne appears on the cover of an issue of Time Magazine.[79]

There are also references to Rosemary's Baby, Pretty Poison, Valley of the Dolls, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Candy, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Pendulum, The Dick Van Dyke Show, and The Killing of Sister George. There is a poster for Don't Make Waves at Sharon Tate's house and one for The Mercenary at the Fox Bruin Theater in Westwood. Tarantino invented fast food chain, Big Kahuna Burger appears on a billboard. He also introduces two new Tarantino universe brands, Chattanooga Beer, and Wolf's Tooth dog food, which may be a reference to Winston "The Wolf" Wolfe, a character portrayed by Harvey Keitel in Pulp Fiction. The final scene features Rick Dalton in a commercial for Red Apple cigarettes, a fictional brand invented by Tarantino and appearing in many of his films.[81][79][29]

Release

Tarantino and Robbie at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood had its world premiere at the Cannes Film Festival on May 21, 2019.[84][85] It was released theatrically in the United States on July 26, 2019, by Sony Pictures Releasing.[86] The film was originally scheduled for release on August 9 to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the Tate–LaBianca murders.[87]

A teaser trailer was released on March 20, 2019, featuring 1960s music by The Mamas & the Papas ("Straight Shooter") and by Los Bravos ("Bring a Little Lovin'").[88] The official trailer was released on May 21, 2019 and featured the songs "Good Thing" by Paul Revere & The Raiders, and "Brother Love's Travelling Salvation Show" by Neil Diamond.[89] All-in-all, the studio spent around $110 million marketing the film worldwide.[3]

Soundtrack

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (soundtrack)
Soundtrack album by
Various Artists
Released2019
GenreRock and roll
Quentin Tarantino film soundtrack chronology
The Hateful Eight
(2015)
Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (soundtrack)
(2019)

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood is also the name of the soundtrack to the film. Pitchfork said the music was "a highlight" and an "oft-disquieting mixtape of golden-age rock’n’roll, radio DJ patter, and period-specific commercials."[90][91]

Track listing

  1. Treat Her RightRoy Head and the Traits
  2. Ramblin’ Gamblin’ ManBob Seger System
  3. HushDeep Purple
  4. Hector – The Village Callers
  5. Son of a Lovin’ Man – Buchanan Brothers
  6. Paxton Quigley's Had The Course – Chad & Jeremy
  7. Hungry – Paul Revere & The Raiders
  8. Good Thing – Paul Revere & The Raiders
  9. Choo Choo Train – The Box Tops
  10. Jenny Take A Ride – Mitch Ryder & The Detroit Wheels
  11. Kentucky Woman – Deep Purple
  12. The Circle Game – Buffy Sainte-Marie
  13. Mrs. RobinsonSimon & Garfunkel
  14. Bring a Little Lovin’Los Bravos
  15. Hey Little Girl – Dee Clark
  16. Brother Love's Traveling Salvation ShowNeil Diamond
  17. Don't Chase Me Around – Robert Corff
  18. Mr. Sun, Mr. Moon (feat. Mark Lindsay) – Paul Revere & The Raiders
  19. California Dreamin’José Feliciano
  20. Dinamite Jim – I Cantori Moderni Di Alessandroni
  21. You Keep Me Hangin’ On – Vanilla Fudge
  22. Miss Lily Langtry – Maurice Jarre

Reception

Box office

As of August 21, 2019, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood has grossed $117.4 million in the United States and Canada, and $66.2 million in other territories, for a worldwide total of $183.6 million.[4][5]

In the United States and Canada, the film was projected to gross $30–40 million from 3,659 theaters in its opening weekend, with some projections having it as high as $50 million or as low as $25 million.[92][93] The week of its release, Fandango reported the film was the highest pre-seller of any Tarantino film.[94] The film made $16.9 million on its first day, including $5.8 million from Thursday night previews (the highest total of Tarantino's career). It went on to debut to $41.1 million, finishing second behind holdover The Lion King and marking Tarantino's largest opening. Comscore reported that 47% of audience members went to see the film because of who the director was (compared to the typical 7%) and 37% went because of the cast (compared to normally 18%).[3] The film grossed $20 million in its second weekend, representing a "nice" drop of just 51% and finishing third, and then made $11.6 million and $7.6 million the subsequent weekends.[95][96][97]

Critical response

On review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes, the film holds an approval rating of 85% based on 463 reviews, with an average rating of 7.8/10. The site's critical consensus reads, "Thrillingly unrestrained yet solidly crafted, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood tempers Tarantino's provocative impulses with the clarity of a mature filmmaker's vision."[98] Metacritic assigned the film a weighted average score of 83 out of 100, based on 61 critics, indicating "universal acclaim".[99] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of "B" on an A+ to F scale, while those at PostTrak gave it an average 4 out of 5 stars and a 58% "definite recommend."[3]

The Hollywood Reporter said critics had "an overall positive view" of the film. Some called the film "Tarantino's love letter to '60s L.A.'" and praised its casting choices and setting, though others were "divided on its ending."[9] Writing for ReelViews, James Berardinelli said the film was "made by a movie-lover for movie-lovers. And even those who don’t qualify may still enjoy the hell out of it.[100] RogerEbert.com's Brian Tallerico gave the film four out of four stars, calling it "layered and ambitious, the product of a confident filmmaker working with collaborators completely in tune with his vision".[101] "Writing for Variety, Owen Gleiberman called the film a "heady engrossing collage of a film—but not, in the end, a masterpiece".[102] Peter Bradshaw of The Guardian gave the film five out of five stars, praising Pitt and DiCaprio's performances and calling the film "outrageous, disorientating, irresponsible, and also brilliant".[103] Steve Pond of TheWrap said: "Big, brash, ridiculous, too long, and in the end invigorating, the film is a grand playground for its director to fetishize old pop culture and bring his gleeful perversity to the craft of movie-making".[104]

Katie Rife of The A.V. Club gave the film a B+, calling it Tarantino's "wistful midlife crisis movie".[105] Richard Brody of The New Yorker called the film an "obscenely regressive vision of the sixties" that "celebrates white-male stardom (and behind-the-scenes command) at the expense of everyone else".[106]

Awards and honors

Award Category Nominee Result Ref(s)
Palm Dog Award Best performance by a canine or group of canines in the Cannes Film Festival selection Sayuri Won [107]

Wikipedia ending

After the film premiered in Cannes and before its theatrical release, an ending leaked on Wikipedia; however, it was not the actual ending of the film. This fake ending featured the Manson Family taking Sharon Tate and others hostage, only to be foiled by Rick Dalton, Cliff Booth, and Bruce Lee, who with an eight-months-pregnant martial arts master Sharon Tate, obliterate the entire Manson Family, including Charles Manson himself. Booth dies in this altercation. Although editors on Wikipedia who had actually seen the film tried to correct it, they were not able to. Most of the debate was whether or not the page should contain spoilers, not if it was accurate.[108]

Portrayals of real-life figures

Bruce Lee

The depiction of martial artist Bruce Lee drew criticism. Some fans and contemporaries of Lee took issue with his braggart portrayal.[109][110] Lee's daughter, Shannon, stated: "He was continuously marginalized and treated like kind of a nuisance of a human being by white Hollywood".[111] Tarantino had not contacted Shannon, who said, "he reached out to other people but did not reach out to me, there’s a level of annoyance."[112] Shannon also said of Tarantino: "It's a little disingenuous for him to say, ‘Well, this is how he was, but this is a fictional movie'."[110] Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, who trained under Lee and appeared with him in Game of Death, stated: "Of course, Tarantino has the artistic right to portray Bruce any way he wants. But to do so in such a sloppy and somewhat racist way is a failure both as an artist and as a human being."[113]

Actor Mike Moh, who played Lee, said he was conflicted about the portrayal at first: "Bruce in my mind was literally a god". He stated "Bruce didn't always have the most affection for stuntmen; he didn't respect all of them".[114] Moh also stated: "Tarantino loves Bruce Lee; he reveres him."[115] According to Lee's friend and The Green Hornet stuntman Gene LeBell, Lee had a reputation for "kicking the shit out of the stuntmen. They couldn’t convince him that he could go easy and it would still look great on film."[21] According to Lee biographer Matthew Polly, "Bruce was very famous for being very considerate of the people below him on film sets, particularly the stuntmen". Polly said Lee was known to fight stuntmen on sets but never instigated a fight.[116] Polly also said Lee “revered” Ali and that Tarantino's film "turns Lee into a disrespectful blowhard and jerk".[116]

Tarantino responded that Lee was "kind of an arrogant guy" and that Lee's widow, Linda, wrote in Bruce Lee: The Man Only I Knew that he could beat Muhammad Ali. The passage in the book is a quotation from a critic, not Linda. Tarantino stated, "If people are saying, ‘Well [Lee] never said he could beat up Muhammad Ali,’ well yeah, he did."[110][17] Bruce Lee once stated, "Everybody says I must fight Ali some day ... Look at my hand. That's a little Chinese hand. He'd kill me."[117] Lee's protégé and training partner, Dan Inosanto, also rejected the film's portrayal of Lee.[110]

Sharon Tate

Tarantino gave an early script to a representative of Roman Polanski, Tate's husband. He wanted to assure Polanski that "he didn’t have anything to worry about". He stated "When it comes to Polanski, we're talking about a tragedy that would be unfathomable for most human beings. I mean there's Sharon, there's his unborn son that literally lived without being born"[118]

Debra Tate, sister of Sharon Tate, initially opposed the film, saying it was exploitative and perpetuated mistruths: "To celebrate the killers and the darkest portion of society as being sexy or acceptable in any way, shape or form is just perpetuating the worst of our society". However, after Tarantino contacted her and showed her the script, she withdrew her opposition, saying: "This movie is not what people would expect it to be when you combine the Tarantino and (Charles) Manson names." She felt that Tarantino was a "very stand-up guy" and after visiting the set she was especially impressed with Margot Robbie, who she lent some of Sharon's jewelry to wear in the film.[119]

After the Cannes premiere, Tarantino was challenged by Farah Nayeri over the portrayal of Tate. Nayeri posited that Robbie had scarce lines, Tarantino responded: "I reject your hypothesis". Robbie responded, "I think the moments on screen show those wonderful sides of [Tate] could be adequately done without speaking".[120][121] Tarantino also told Deadline: "I thought it would both be touching and pleasurable and also sad and melancholy to just spend a little time with [Tate], just existing...I wanted you to see Sharon a lot".[122]

Notes

  1. ^ Stylized onscreen as Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood and promoted as Once Upon a Time in… Hollywood.

References

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External links