Azatadine

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Azatadine
Azatadine.svg
Systematic (IUPAC) name
11-(1-methylpiperidin-4-ylidene)-6,11-dihydro-
5H-benzo[5,6]cyclohepta[1,2-b]pyridine
Clinical data
Trade names Optimine
AHFS/Drugs.com Micromedex Detailed Consumer Information
Pregnancy cat.
Legal status
Identifiers
CAS number 3964-81-6 YesY
ATC code R06AX09
PubChem CID 19861
DrugBank DB00719
ChemSpider 18709 YesY
UNII 94Z39NID6C YesY
KEGG D07482 YesY
ChEBI CHEBI:2946 YesY
ChEMBL CHEMBL946 YesY
Chemical data
Formula C20H22N2 
Mol. mass 290.402 g/mol
 YesY (what is this?)  (verify)

Azatadine (Optimine) is a first-generation antihistamine and anticholinergic that was launched Schering-Plough in 1973.[1][2][3]

It was patented in 1967.[4]

  • It is a predecessor to loratidine, albeit lacking the chlorine atom. Also, it is N-methyl instead of carboethoxyamido.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zhang, D.; Hansen Jr, E. B.; Deck, J.; Heinze, T. M.; Sutherland, J. B.; Cerniglia, C. E. (1996). "Fungal biotransformation of the antihistamine azatadine by Cunninghamella elegans". Applied and environmental microbiology 62 (9): 3477–3479. PMC 168147. PMID 8795241.  edit
  2. ^ Katelaris, C. (1990). "Comparative effects of loratadine and azatadine in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis". Asian Pacific journal of allergy and immunology / launched by the Allergy and Immunology Society of Thailand 8 (2): 103–107. PMID 1982614.  edit
  3. ^ Small, P.; Barrett, D.; Biskin, N. (1990). "Effects of azatadine, terfenadine, and astemizole on allergen-induced nasal provocation". Annals of allergy 64 (2 Pt 1): 129–131. PMID 1968324.  edit
  4. ^ Azatadine, Villani, F. J.; Caldwell, W. U.S. Patent 3,326,924 (1967).