Melitracen

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Melitracen
Melitracen-structure.png
Systematic (IUPAC) name
3-(10,10-dimethylanthracen-9(10H)-ylidene)-N,N-dimethylpropan-1-amine
Clinical data
AHFS/Drugs.com International Drug Names
Legal status Prescription only
Routes Oral, IM
Identifiers
CAS number 5118-29-6 N
ATC code N06AA14
PubChem CID 25382
ChemSpider 23697 YesY
UNII Q7T0Y1109Z YesY
KEGG D08171 YesY
ChEMBL CHEMBL110094 YesY
Chemical data
Formula C21H25N 
Mol. mass 291.43 g/mol
 N (what is this?)  (verify)

Melitracen (Adaptol, Dixeran, Melixeran, Thymeol, Trausabun) is a tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) marketed in Europe and Japan by Lundbeck and Takeda, respectively, for the treatment of depression and anxiety.[1][2][3][4] In addition to single drug preparations, it is also available as Deanxit, a combination product containing both melitracen and flupentixol.[5][6][7][8]

The pharmacology of melitracen has not been properly investigated and is largely unknown, but it is likely to act in a similar manner to other TCAs. Indeed, melitracen is reported to have imipramine and amitriptyline-like effects and efficacy against depression and anxiety, though with improved tolerability and a somewhat faster onset of action.[9][10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Swiss Pharmaceutical Society (2000). Index Nominum 2000: International Drug Directory (Book with CD-ROM). Boca Raton: Medpharm Scientific Publishers. ISBN 3-88763-075-0. 
  2. ^ Hall, Chapman and; Chemical Abstracts Service, American Chemical Society; Rhodes, P. H (1996). Dictionary of organic compounds. London: Chapman & Hall. ISBN 0-412-54090-8. 
  3. ^ O'Neil, Maryadele J. (2001). The Merck index: an encyclopedia of chemicals, drugs, and biologicals. Rahway, NJ: Merck Research Laboratories. ISBN 0-911910-13-1. 
  4. ^ José Miguel Vela; Helmut Buschmann; Jörg Holenz; Antonio Párraga; Antoni Torrens (2007). Antidepressants, Antipsychotics, Anxiolytics: From Chemistry and Pharmacology to Clinical Application. Weinheim: Wiley-VCH. ISBN 3-527-31058-4. 
  5. ^ Muller, Niels F; Dessing, Rudolf P; Pharmacy, European Society of Clinical (1998). European Drug Index, 4th Edition. Boca Raton: CRC Press. ISBN 3-7692-2114-1. 
  6. ^ Van Moffaert M, Dierick M, De Meulemeester F, Vereecken A (1983). "Treatment of depressive anxiety states associated with psychosomatic symptoms. A double-blind multicentre clinical study: mianserin versus melitracen-flupentixol". Acta Psychiatrica Belgica 83 (5): 525–39. PMID 6670581. 
  7. ^ Bin Yaacob H (April 1985). "Flupenthixol and Melitracen in the management of trigeminal neuralgia". Dental Journal of Malaysia 8 (2): 37–8. PMID 3917005. 
  8. ^ Hashash JG, Abdul-Baki H, Azar C et al. (June 2008). "Clinical trial: a randomized controlled cross-over study of flupenthixol + melitracen in functional dyspepsia". Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics 27 (11): 1148–55. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2036.2008.03677.x. PMID 18331614. 
  9. ^ Aronson, Jeffrey Kenneth (2008). Meyler's Side Effects of Psychiatric Drugs (Meylers Side Effects). Amsterdam: Elsevier Science. ISBN 0-444-53266-8. 
  10. ^ Author Unknown (1970). Ann Reports Medicinal Chem V5 (v. 5). Boston: Academic Press. ISBN 0-12-040505-9.