Voiceless palatal lateral affricate

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Voiceless palatal lateral affricate

The voiceless palatal lateral affricate is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. There are two ways it can be represented: Either by using the IPA as ⟨c͡ʎ̥˔⟩, or by using the non-IPA sign for the voiceless palatal lateral fricative as ⟨c͡⟩.[citation needed]


Features of the voiceless alveolar lateral affricate:

  • Its manner of articulation is affricate, which means it is produced by first stopping the airflow entirely, then allowing air flow through a constricted channel at the place of articulation, causing turbulence.
  • Its place of articulation is palatal, which means it is articulated with the middle or back part of the tongue raised to the hard palate.
  • Its phonation is voiceless, which means it is produced without vibrations of the vocal cords.
  • It is an oral consonant, which means air is allowed to escape through the mouth only.
  • It is a lateral consonant, which means it is produced by directing the airstream over the sides of the tongue, rather than down the middle.
  • The airstream mechanism is pulmonic, which means it is articulated by pushing air solely with the lungs and diaphragm, as in most sounds.


The sound occurs in Hadza and, as a palatal lateral ejective affricate (see), in Dahalo.

Language Word IPA Meaning Notes
Hadza tlakate [c͡akate] 'rhinoceros' Contrasts with ejective and aspirated forms. Although initial contact varies from alveolar to palatal, frication is always palatal.