Voiced alveolo-palatal affricate

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Voiced alveolo-palatal affricate
d͡ʑ
d͜ʑ
ɟ͡ʑ
ɟ͜ʑ
IPA number 216
Encoding
Entity (decimal) ʥ
Unicode (hex) U+02A5
X-SAMPA d_z\ or J\_z\
Sound

The voiced alveolo-palatal sibilant affricate is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. The symbols in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represent this sound are ⟨d͡ʑ⟩, ⟨d͜ʑ⟩, ⟨ɟ͡ʑ⟩ and ⟨ɟ͜ʑ⟩, and the equivalent X-SAMPA symbols are d_z\ and J\_z\, though transcribing the stop component with ⟨ɟ⟩ (J\ in X-SAMPA) is rare. The tie bar is sometimes omitted, yielding ⟨⟩ or ⟨ɟʑ⟩ in the IPA and dz\ or J\z\ in X-SAMPA. This is potentially problematic in case of at least some affricates, because there are languages that contrast certain affricates with stop-fricative sequences. Polish words czysta ('clean (f.)', pronounced with an affricate /t͡ʂ/) and trzysta ('three hundred', pronounced with a sequence /tʂ/) are an example of a minimal pair based on such a contrast.

Neither [d] nor [ɟ] are a completely narrow transcription of the stop component, which can be narrowly transcribed as [d̠ʲ] (retracted and palatalized [d]), [ɟ̟] or [ɟ˖] (both symbols denote an advanced [ɟ]). The equivalent X-SAMPA symbols are d_-' or d_-_j and J\_+, respectively.

This affricate used to have a dedicated symbol ⟨ʥ⟩, which was one of the six dedicated symbols for affricates in the International Phonetic Alphabet. It is the sibilant equivalent of voiced palatal affricate.

Features[edit]

Features of the voiced alveolo-palatal affricate:

Occurrence[edit]

Language Word IPA Meaning Notes
Bengali খন [d͡ʑɔkʰon] 'when' See Bengali phonology
Catalan[1] All dialects metge [ˈmedd͡ʑə] 'doctor' See Catalan phonology
Valencian joc [ˈd͡ʑɔk] 'game'
Chinese Taiwanese Hokkien /ji̍t [d͡ʑit̚˧ʔ] 'sun'
Wu [d͡ʑy] 'he/she/it'
Japanese 知人/chijin [t͡ɕid͡ʑĩɴ] 'acquaintance' See Japanese phonology
Korean 감자/gamja [kɐmd͡ʑɐ] 'potato' See Korean phonology
Polish[2] więk About this sound [d͡ʑvjɛŋk]  'sound' See Polish phonology
Romanian Banat dialect[3] des [d͡ʑes] 'frequent' Corresponds to [d] in standard Romanian. See Romanian phonology
Russian дочь бы [ˈd̪o̞d͡ʑ bɨ] 'daughter would' Allophone of /t͡ɕ/ before voiced consonants. See Russian phonology
Sema[4] aji [à̠d͡ʑì] 'blood' Possible allophone of /ʒ/ before /i, e/; can be realized as [ʑ ~ ʒ ~ d͡ʒ] instead.[4]
Serbo-Croatian ђаво / đavo [d͡ʑâ̠ʋo̞ː] 'devil' Merges with /d͡ʒ/ in most Croatian and some Bosnian accents. See Serbo-Croatian phonology
Uzbek[5] [example needed]
Xumi Lower[6] [Hd͡ʑɐʔ] 'water'
Upper[7] [Hd͡ʑɜ]
Yi /jji [d͡ʑi˧] 'bee'

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Bibliography[edit]