iPad (2017)

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iPad
IPad Logo (2017).svg
IPad 2017 tablet.jpg
The iPad in silver
Also known as5th generation iPad, 7th generation iPad, iPad 2017
DeveloperApple Inc.
ManufacturerFoxconn
Product familyiPad
TypeTablet computer
Release dateMarch 24, 2017
Introductory price$329
DiscontinuedMarch 27, 2018
Operating systemOriginal: iOS 10.2.1
Current: iOS 12.1, released October 30, 2018 (2018-10-30)
System-on-chip usedApple A9 with 64-bit architecture and Apple M9 motion co-processor
CPU1.85 GHz dual-core 64-bit ARMv8-A "Twister"[1]
Memory2 GB LPDDR4 RAM[1]
Storage32 or 128 GB flash memory
Display9.7 inches (250 mm) 2,048 × 1,536 px[1] (264 ppi) with a 4:3 aspect ratio
GraphicsPowerVR GT7600 GPU[1]
SoundStereo
InputMulti-touch screen, headset controls, M9 motion co-processor, proximity and ambient light sensors, 3-axis accelerometer, 3-axis gyroscope, Touch ID fingerprint reader, barometer
CameraFront: 1.2 MP, 720p HD, ƒ/2.2 aperture
Rear: 8.0 MP AF, iSight with Five Element Lens, Hybrid IR filter, video stabilization, face detection, HDR, ƒ/2.4 aperture
Connectivity
Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi + Cellular:
Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac at 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz and MIMO

Bluetooth 4.2

Wi-Fi + Cellular:
GPS & GLONASS
GSM
UMTS / HSDPA
850, 1700, 1900, 2100 MHz
GSM / EDGE
850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz
CDMA
CDMA/EV-DO Rev. A and B.
800, 1900 MHz
LTE
Multiple bands
A1567: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 12, 13, 17, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 28, 29 and TD-LTE 38, 39, 40, 41
PowerBuilt-in rechargeable Li-Po battery
8,827 mAh 3.7 V 32.9 W⋅h (118 kJ)
Online servicesApp Store, iTunes Store, iBooks Store, iCloud, Game Center
Dimensions240 mm (9.4 in) (h)
169.5 mm (6.67 in) (w)
7.5 mm (0.30 in) (d)
WeightWi-Fi: 469 g (1.034 lb)
Wi-Fi + Cellular: 478 g (1.054 lb)
PredecessoriPad Air 2
iPad Pro (9.7-inch)
SuccessoriPad (2018)
Related articles
WebsiteApple - iPad at the Wayback Machine (archived July 1, 2017)

The iPad (officially fifth-generation iPad) is a 9.7-inch tablet computer designed, developed, and marketed by Apple Inc. After its announcement on March 21, 2017, conflicting naming conventions spawned a number of different names, including seventh-generation iPad or iPad 2017. It retains the screen size of the iPad Air line of tablets, and is more powerful than iPad Air 2, even as its overall dimensions and weight are more similar to the original iPad Air.

Unlike the iPad Air 2, this generation of iPad does not have a fully laminated display and lacks an anti-reflective coating. Unlike the iPad Pro, it does not have a Smart Connector and only features a dual-speaker system.

The iPad received mixed reviews. It was significantly praised for performance, with reviewers asserting that the model is noticeably faster than older iPad models, and it also received positive reviews for its price and battery life. It was criticized, however, for lacking a laminated and anti-reflective screen, and lack of support for Apple Pencil and attachable keyboards through the Smart Connector. Its introductory price in the United States was the lowest ever for an iPad, with the media noting that the lower price might be an effort to encourage wider adoption of the tablet in the education sector, as well as for businesses needing inexpensive tablets for undemanding uses.

On March 27, 2018, Apple announced its successor, the 2018 iPad. This also marked the discontinuation of this iPad.

History[edit]

The iPad was announced by Apple on March 21, 2017 in a press release.[2][3][4] There has been confusion around its naming, being referred to as just "iPad" in marketing,[3] but called the "fifth-generation iPad" in official statements and specifications sheets,[5][6] a title previously taken by 2013's iPad Air.[7][8] Other sources refer to it as the "seventh-generation iPad",[9] when including the iPad Air and iPad Air 2 as the fifth- and sixth-generation iPads respectively.[10] It has also been referred to as "iPad 2017".[11][12][13][14]

Pricing strategies[edit]

Matt Kapko of CIO wrote that Apple's introductory pricing of $329 in the United States for the iPad, a $70 price reduction versus the iPad Air 2, appeared designed to fend off the encroachment of Google's Chromebook laptops in the education sector and to foster wider adoption in customer-facing terminals. Kapko also wrote that the device is designed to appeal to businesses that require inexpensive tablets for undemanding use, including as kiosks, checkout terminals, and hospitality screens.[15]

Specifications[edit]

Software[edit]

At the time of its original release, the iPad shipped with iOS 10, a version of Apple's mobile operating system.[2] New units sold come with the new iOS 11 operating system instead.[16] The included Touch ID fingerprint sensor allows the user to unlock the device as well as approve purchases from the App Store, iTunes Store, and iBooks Store. Touch ID and Apple Pay let the user purchase items from websites or from within apps.[2][3]

Hardware[edit]

The iPad has a 9.7-inch (25cm) screen.[1] Compared to the iPad Air 2, the processor is updated from the Apple A8X to the A9 with the embedded Apple M9 motion co-processor.[17] The iPad has 2 gigabytes of RAM.[1] It is 7.5mm thick, which is the same thickness as the iPad Air,[4] compared to 6.1mm of the iPad Air 2.[18] Unlike other iPad models available, this iPad's display is not fully laminated and does not have anti-reflective coating.[3][19] However, this iPad has a brighter screen than the iPad Air 2 (25% brighter according to Apple).[20] It is available in 32 and 128 gigabyte storage options.[21] Contrasting with the iPad Pro lineup, this iPad features only two speakers (as opposed to four), has no Smart Connector support, and has no flash on the back.[11] It is offered in silver, gold, and space grey colors.[11] Despite its use of the Apple A9 processor and accompanying M9 motion co-processor, introduced with the iPhone 6S in 2015, the iPad does not feature support for always-on "Hey Siri" voice input, a feature advertised as being made possible by low-power processing in the then-new chips. The use of "Hey Siri" is limited to when the iPad is connected to power.[22]

A product teardown by iFixit showed that the design of this iPad is nearly identical to the iPad Air except for a few differences: the addition of Touch ID, the lack of the physical mute switch, the microphone holes are smaller and there is only a single row of speaker holes.[23][24]

Reception[edit]

Dieter Bohn of The Verge wrote that "it is a thin, fast tablet", and praised the screen for being "very good", despite not having "the fancy True Tone display that the iPad Pro does, nor does it have some of the things that made the screen on the iPad Air 2 so nice: lamination and anti-reflectivity". He criticized the lack of support for attachable keyboards and Apple Pencil, while praising the A9 processor as "significantly faster than older iPads", though noting that it isn't "necessarily significantly faster than the iPad Air 2", and "not as fast as the iPad Pro". He also disliked that the iPad only features two speakers, as opposed to four on the iPad Pro, while summarizing the overall review with "Fundamentally, what I am trying to tell you is that this is an iPad. You trust that iPads are decent tablets and that they have a basic level of quality, speed, and functionality" and "Get one if you need one, but don't stress that you're missing out if you don't."[25]

Sascha Segan of PC Magazine wrote that "The Apple iPad is more affordable than ever" and noted that "While there's little reason for existing iPad owners to upgrade, the new iPad's price stabs a stake into the heart of many competing Android tablets". Although criticizing the non-laminated display for being "a little more washed out than its predecessor", he claimed that he "couldn't see a measurable difference" and that it's "a nominal degradation in quality that doesn't really matter in everyday use". Segan also praised performance compared to the prior iPad models, and also praised improved Wi-Fi performance, writing that it is "quite impressive" with "double the Wi-Fi speeds on the new iPad than I did on the Air 2".[26] Jeff Benjamin of 9to5Mac wrote that "Sure, it lacks the gorgeous laminated, anti-reflective display of the iPad Air 2, and sure it’s not as svelte in either thickness or weight. But there’s no denying that the 2017 iPad with A9 dual core processor in tow, is a good value". He described the tablet as a "solid buy for upgraders and new users".[27]

Igor Bonifacic of MobileSyrup also praised the performance, as well as number of iPad apps available, but criticized the camera for being outdated and keyboard/Pencil incompatibility, with a summarization reading: "The 2017 iPad is not an exciting tablet. But then it’s not supposed to be exciting, [...] Apple’s latest tablet is an iterative update designed to appeal to a specific subset of consumers". Bonifacic also called the tablet "perfect for first-time tablet buyers".[28] Chris Velazco of Engadget praised battery life, describing it as "one of the best iPads we've tested", but also criticized the lack of anti-reflection on the display, calling it "another cost-saving measure that I wish Apple had reconsidered".[29]

Timeline[edit]

iPad Pro (2018)iPad Pro (2018)iPad Pro (2017)iPad Pro (2017)iPad ProiPad ProiPad Mini 4iPad Mini 3iPad Mini 2iPad Mini (1st generation)iPad (2018)iPad (2017)iPad Air 2iPad AiriPad (4th generation)iPad (3rd generation)iPad (2nd generation)iPad (1st generation)
Source: Apple Newsroom Archive[30]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Smith, Ryan (March 21, 2017). "Apple Announces 2017 iPad 9.7-Inch: Entry Level iPad now at $329". AnandTech. Purch Group. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
  2. ^ a b c "New 9.7-inch iPad features stunning Retina display and incredible performance". Apple Newsroom. Apple Inc. March 21, 2017. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d Rossignol, Joe (March 21, 2017). "Apple Debuts New 9.7-Inch iPad With A9 Chip to Replace iPad Air 2, Starting at $329". MacRumors. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
  4. ^ a b Vincent, James (March 21, 2017). "Apple replaces iPad Air 2 with cheaper 9.7-inch iPad". The Verge. Vox Media. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
  5. ^ Clover, Juli (March 22, 2017). "The New iPad vs. 9.7-inch iPad Pro and iPad Air 2". MacRumors. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
  6. ^ "iPad (5th generation) - Technical Specifications". Apple Inc. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
  7. ^ Epstein, Zach (October 14, 2013). "iPad 6 with better-than-Retina display reportedly launching in 2014". BGR. Penske Media Corporation. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
  8. ^ Hughes, Neil; Campbell, Mikey (November 3, 2013). "Review: Apple's fifth-generation iPad Air". AppleInsider. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
  9. ^ Price, Andy (March 21, 2017). "Apple unveils new iPad and iPhone hardware in surprise announcement". TapSmart. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
  10. ^ Perlow, Jason (August 13, 2015). "iPad Air 3 and what Apple needs to deliver". ZDNet. CBS Interactive. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
  11. ^ a b c Price, David (March 21, 2017). "New iPad 2017 preview: Apple's affordable but underspecced new iPad may appeal to the education sector". Macworld. International Data Group. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
  12. ^ Keach, Sean (March 22, 2017). "New iPad 2017 (9.7-inch) release date, specs, features and price". Trusted Reviews. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
  13. ^ Wuerthele, Mike (April 5, 2017). "Review: Apple's 2017 9.7" iPad with A9 CPU isn't a game-changer, but it isn't supposed to be". AppleInsider. Retrieved April 15, 2017.
  14. ^ Evans, Austin (2 April 2017). Is the 2017 iPad Worth It? (YouTube Video). Linus Sebastian. Retrieved 3 May 2017.
  15. ^ Kapko, Matt (March 22, 2017). "Why Apple dropped iPad's price to lowest yet". CIO. International Data Group. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
  16. ^ "iPad Tech Specs". Apple Inc. Retrieved October 11, 2017.
  17. ^ "Compare iPad models". Apple Inc. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
  18. ^ Bell, Killian (March 21, 2017). "New iPad is thicker and heavier than iPad Air 2". Cult of Mac. Retrieved March 26, 2017.
  19. ^ Goldman, Joshua (March 21, 2017). "New $329 Apple iPad is a slightly upgraded Air 2 for less". CNET. CBS Interactive. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
  20. ^ Cunningham, Andrew (April 6, 2017). "Review: Apple's $329 iPad is for people who have never upgraded their tablet". Ars Technica. Condé Nast. Retrieved April 12, 2017.
  21. ^ Heisler, Yoni (March 21, 2017). "Here's every single new product Apple announced today". BGR. Penske Media Corporation. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
  22. ^ Wuerthele, Mike (May 9, 2017). "Apple's 2017 iPad lacks always-on 'Hey Siri' support, despite inclusion of M9 chip". AppleInsider. Retrieved May 9, 2017.
  23. ^ "iPad 5 Teardown". iFixit. March 30, 2017. Retrieved March 31, 2017.
  24. ^ Thakran, Shekhar (March 31, 2017). "iPad (2017) Teardown Reveals the Tablet Is Very Similar to iPad Air: iFixit". Gadgets360. NDTV. Retrieved March 31, 2017.
  25. ^ Bohn, Dieter (April 4, 2017). "Apple iPad (2017) review: The best feature is the price". The Verge. Vox Media. Retrieved April 5, 2017.
  26. ^ Segan, Sascha. "Apple iPad (2017)". PC Magazine. Ziff Davis. Retrieved April 5, 2017.
  27. ^ Benjamin, Jeff (March 30, 2017). "Review: Apple's $329 iPad is not without compromise, but a solid buy for upgraders and new users [Video]". 9to5Mac. Retrieved April 5, 2017.
  28. ^ Bonifacic, Igor (April 4, 2017). "iPad (2017) review: Perfect for first-time tablet buyers". MobileSyrup. Retrieved April 5, 2017.
  29. ^ Velazco, Chris (April 6, 2017). "Apple iPad review (2017): No alarms and no surprises". Engadget. AOL. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  30. ^ Apple Inc. (2010–2011). iPad News - Newsroom Archive. Retrieved June 7, 2018.

External links[edit]