Shami kebab

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Shami kebab
4th October 2012 Shami Kebab.jpg
Shami Kebab with pasta, served on a bed of cucumbers
Place of origin
Punjab, Pakistan and India
Region or state
Indian subcontinent
Main ingredients
Meat, fish and spices
Variations Many variations exist
Cookbook:Shami kebab  Shami kebab

Shami kebab or Shaami kebab (Punjabi: شامی کباب, Urdu: شامی کباب‎, Hindi: शामी कबाब) is a popular local variety of kebab especially in Punjab. It is a part of Indian and Pakistani cuisine. A variation of the Shaami kebab is also found in Bangladeshi cuisine. It is composed of a small patty of minced meat, (usually beef or mutton in India, but occasionally lamb or mutton), with ground chickpeas, egg to hold it together, and spices.[1]

Shami kebabs are a popular snack throughout India and Pakistan.[2][3] They are often garnished with lemon juice and/or sliced raw onions, and may be eaten with chutney made from mint or coriander. They are also served along with Sheer Khurma during Eid celebrations.

History[edit]

Shaami Kebab is one of the many local variants of the Kebab from the Punjab region of Pakistan and India. Shami Kebab has its origins in the word Sham( Arabic for Syria and the Levant ). It is believed that this kebab originates from the Near East.

Preparation[edit]

Shami Kebab ready for frying.

Shami kababs are boiled or sauteed meat and chick pea lentils (chana daal) with whole hot spices (garam masala, black pepper, cinnamon, cloves bayleaf), whole ginger, whole garlic and some salt to taste until completely tender. Onions, turmeric, chili powder, egg, chopped coriander and mint leaves may be added in preparing kebab. Garam masala powder (ground spices) may be used in place of whole hot spices.[4][5][6]

Serving[edit]

Shami kebabs may be served with roti along with ketchup, hot sauce, chilli garlic sauce, raita or chutney. Before serving the kebabs it is also common to dip them in a beaten egg mixture and double fry them. They are also commonly eaten in Hyderabad with ordinary rice and/or chapati.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]