Philotes (mythology)

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In Greek mythology, Philotes[pronunciation?] (Greek: Φιλότης) was a minor goddess or spirit (daimones) personifying affection, friendship, and sex. She was a daughter of the goddess Nyx.

According to Hesiod's Theogony, she represented sexual and social intercourse. Her siblings are said to be Apate (Deceit) and Nemesis (Envy).[1] She was described by Empedocles as one of the driving forces behind creation, being paired together with Neikea (Feuds); Philotes being the cause of good things and Neikea the cause of bad.[2] He also identifies her with Kypris[3] and mentions that Philotes feels hurt and offended by life-destroying offerings and demands the abstention from animal sacrifices.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stephen Scully (2015). Hesiod's Theogony: from Near Eastern Creation Myths to Paradise Lost. Oxford University Press. p. 44. ISBN 978-0-19-025396-7. 
  2. ^ Stephen Scully (2015). Hesiod's Theogony: from Near Eastern Creation Myths to Paradise Lost. Oxford University Press. p. 96. ISBN 978-0-19-025396-7. 
  3. ^ Felix M. Cleve (2013). The giants of pre-sophistic Greek philosophy. Springer. p. 354. ISBN 978-94-017-5665-5. 
  4. ^ Felix M. Cleve (2013). The giants of pre-sophistic Greek philosophy. Springer. p. 390. ISBN 978-94-017-5665-5. 

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