Kapal Mochan

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Kapal Mochan Sarovar and Gau-Bacha Temple

Kapal Mochan is an ancient place of pilgrimage for both Hindus and Sikhs, 17 km north-east of Jagadhari town, on the Bilaspur road in Yamunanagar district.[1] It is also called Gopal Mochan and Somsar Mochan. As per Legend, Brāhmanahatya i.e. killing of Brahmin is considered as a major sin, but one who kills a Brahmin and bath here, his Brāhmanahatya sins will be washed. Nearby Bilaspur, Haryana (not to be confused with Bilaspur, Himachal Pradesh) in Yamuna Nagar District which takes its name from the corrupted form of "Vyas Puri", was the ashram of Ved Vyasa rishi where he wrote the Mahabharta on the banks of Sarasvati river near Adi Badri where Sarasvati river leaves Himalayas and enters the plains.[2]

Demographics[edit]

As of 2001 India census,[3] Bilaspur had a population of 9620. Males constitute 53% of the population and females 47%. Bilaspur has an average literacy rate of 65%, higher than the national average of 59.5%; with male literacy of 69% and female literacy of 61%. 14% of the population is under 6 years of age.

Kapal Mochan Mela[edit]

The place finds mention in the Puranas and the Mahabharata,[4] and was visited by Mahadeva, Rama and Pandavas.

There is historical Mahadev Temple, Gau Bacha Temple and Gurdwara with ancient Pool. Every year, nearly five lakh pilgrims visit the place during the annual, "Kapal Mochan Mela" during November.[5][6]

History[edit]

Mahadev Visit[edit]

Mahadev Temple

Mahadev also visited this place after killing Brahma Ji.

Sri Rama Visit[edit]

In satyug era Lord Rama came here in his Pushpak Viman after killing Ravana, The Brahmin. From that day this pond is called Surya Kund[7]

Guru Nanak Visit[edit]

Gurdwara Kapal Mochan, commemorates visit of Nanak and Gobind Singh

Also Guru Nanak and Guru Gobind Singh visited this place to share Sikh doctrines.[8]

Guru Nanak Dev stopped here during one of his udasis in 1584 and have spoke to a large gathering disputing the ritual of Sootak (the concept that a newborn baby is born impure). According to Nanak, Sootak is there on Mind when it is entangles in vices. Adi Granth states: ਮਨ ਕਾ ਸੂਤਕੁ ਲੋਭੁ ਹੈ ਜਿਹਵਾ ਸੂਤਕੁ ਕੂੜੁ ॥ ਅਖੀ ਸੂਤਕੁ ਵੇਖਣਾ ਪਰ ਤ੍ਰਿਅ ਪਰ ਧਨ ਰੂਪੁ ॥ ਕੰਨੀ ਸੂਤਕੁ ਕੰਨਿ ਪੈ ਲਾਇਤਬਾਰੀ ਖਾਹਿ ॥.[9] A Gurdwara is located with temple which commemorates his visit.[10]

Guru Gobind Singh visit[edit]

Guru Gobind Singh visited Kapal Mochan after Battle of Bhangani in 1688 and gave robes of honour (turbans) to soldiers who fought this victorious war against Hill Rulers. He also had discourse with priests of temple on Durga. He gave Hukamnama to temple priests which is still preserved by them. Also, Guru Gobind Singh and his soldiers get temple, rid of those people, who pollute the pond water, by doing toilets on short distances from ponds.[11] In Dasam Granth, Khalsa Mahima(the praise of Khalsa) and Charitar 71 describe a few events happened during Gobind Singh's stay at Kapal Mochan.

Nearby Attractions[edit]

Nearby Bilaspur, Haryana (not to be confused with Bilaspur, Himachal Pradesh) in Yamuna Nagar District which takes its name from the corrupted form of "Vyas Puri", was the ashram of Ved Vyasa rishi where he wrote the Mahabharta on the banks of Sarasvati river near Adi Badri where Sarasvati river leaves Himalayas and enters the plains.[2] On Jagadhari road lies another popular religious site of Kapal Mochan.

References[edit]

Coordinates: 30°19′32″N 77°19′3″E / 30.32556°N 77.31750°E / 30.32556; 77.31750

  1. ^ yamunanagar.nic.in Archived 21 August 2014 at the Wayback Machine.: About Kapal Mochan Temple
  2. ^ a b Sarasvati Sodh Sansthan Publications 2015
  3. ^ "Census of India 2001: Data from the 2001 Census, including cities, villages and towns (Provisional)". Census Commission of India. Archived from the original on 16 June 2004. Retrieved 1 November 2008. 
  4. ^ "Five lakh pilgrims arrive to take part in Kapal Mochan fair". Indian Express. 9 November 2011. Retrieved 21 August 2014. 
  5. ^ "Lakhs throng Kapal Mochan Mela". The Hindu. 10 November 2011. Retrieved 21 August 2014. 
  6. ^ "Tight security for holy dip during Kapal Mochan Mela". Zee News. 16 November 2013. Retrieved 21 August 2014. 
  7. ^ yamunanagar.nic.in: History of Kapal Mochan
  8. ^ The Sikh Encyclopedia: Kapal Mochan
  9. ^ Page 472, Adi Granth, Nanak
  10. ^ G.S., Randhir (1990). Sikh shrines in India. New Delhi: The Director of Publication Division, Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Government of India. pp. 42–43. 
  11. ^ Charitar 71, Charitar of Kapal Mochan, Charitropakhyan, Dasam Granth, Guru Gobind Singh