David Doubilet

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David Doubilet (born November 28, 1946) is a well known underwater photographer[1] known primarily for his work published in National Geographic Magazine. He was born in New York City and started taking photos underwater at the young age of 12. He started with a Brownie Hawkeye in a rubber anesthesiologist's bag to keep the water out of the camera. During his summer holidays, he spent his time along the New Jersey coast in Long Branch, later residing in the city's Elberon section.[2] He later worked as a diver and photographer for the Sandy Hook Marine Laboratories in New Jersey. He also spent much time in the Caribbean. While a dive instructor in the Bahamas, he found his motivation to capture the beauty of the sea and everything in it.

Photography[edit]

Doubilet's passion for underwater photography is inspired by environmentalism: "The desire to make an image that makes people think about, fall in love with, and protect the sea."[3]

His goal as a photographer is to "redefine photographic boundaries" every time he enters the water. "We always try to add one more step, one more piece of vision, one more piece of technology. Where technology meets dreams, you make photographs," he explained during a 2011 interview. "How can I illustrate this? How can I make this picture something more than what we see, something more exciting and put it on the page that incorporates the poetry, and the environment, and the atmosphere of a place that you're shooting? I think that that's the biggest challenge."[4]

In order to capture underwater wildlife, he takes several cameras, lenses and underwater strobes (flash systems) on each of his trips, primarily Nikon digital SLRs with ultra wide angle and Micro (macro) lenses, Sea & Sea strobes and SeaCam housings.[5] Doubilet was one of the pioneers of underwater photography in respect to the split field image technique[6] also called over/under images[7] that include elements both above and below water in a single image, with both rendered in focus. This calls for an ultra wide angle lens used at a small aperture in a housing with a dome (not flat) port.[8][9]

Doubilet graduated from Boston University College of Communication in 1970. He is a member of the Royal Photographic Society.

He has shot nearly 70 stories for National Geographic since his first assignment in 1971 about garden eels in the Red Sea. (Some of the articles were written and illustrated jointly with with wife and photographic partner Jennifer Hayes, an aquatic biologist and photojournalist specializing in natural history and marine environments).[10] He has authored 12 books to date, including David Doubilet: Water Light Time (Phaidon Press, 2016) which includes images made over the past 25 years.[11][12] Doubilet's most recently published major assignment - completed with Jennifer Hayes - was a photo shoot in Cuban waters, which was published as Changing Cuba: The Caribbean's Crown Jewels, in the November 2016 issue of the magazine.[13] The locations of other significant assignments over the past few years include the Great Barrier Reef, the Gulf of Mexico and the Gulf of St. Lawrence.[14][15]

David Doubilet and Jennifer Hayes live in the small town of Clayton, New York in the Thousand Islands area of the St. Lawrence River, where they co-own a studio and stock photography company, Undersea Images Inc. that was formed in 1999.[16][17] Doubilet owns a second home in the small coastal town of Dekolder, South Africa.[18] Working as a team they co-produce illustrated articles for National Geographic and others in addition to marketing stock photos and doing speaking engagements.[19]

Doubilet is a founding Fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers.[20] He has received many awards for his works, such as The Explorers Club's Lowell Thomas Awards and the Lennart Nilsson Award for scientific photography (2001)[1] and others from the BBC, POY, and The Academy of Achievement.[21] in 2000, Doubilet was awarded an Honorary Fellowship of the Royal Photographic Society. The latter is awarded to "distinguished persons having, from their position or attainments, an intimate connection with the science or fine art of photography or the application thereof."[22]

See also[edit]

Sources[edit]

  1. ^ Interview in National Geographic News, 18 March 2003
  2. ^ Nash, Margo. "PHOTOGRAPHY; Beneath The Sea, With Fins And Lens", The New York Times, June 11, 2000. Accessed September 17, 2013.
  3. ^ Dotschkal, Janna (November 1, 2016). "Going to Great Depths to Illuminate Hidden Underwater Worlds". National Geographic. NGS. Retrieved December 11, 2016. The perfect photograph has the power to seize and hold your attention. Pictures have the power to educate, illuminate, or humiliate. I like images that combine the weight of science, conservation, and poetry. 
  4. ^ Knoblauch, Jessica (September 2011). "DOWN TO EARTH: Q&A WITH PHOTOGRAPHER DAVID DOUBILET". Earthjustice. Earthjustice. Retrieved December 11, 2016. 
  5. ^ excerpt from DIVER magazine (September 2010). "My favourite kit - David Doubilet". Divernet. Divernet. Retrieved December 11, 2016. 
  6. ^ Hanlong, Adam (June 30, 2015). "Ask the Pros: Split shots". Wetpixel. Wetpixel LLC. Retrieved December 11, 2016. These pictures must be made at f16 or f22 for depth of field to hold up... Underwater the lens focuses on a virtual image 18 inches in front of the dome. Overwater the lens focuses on infinity making depth of field a critical element in the image. 
  7. ^ "Underwater Photography Tips for Getting Started". Nikon. Nikon Inc. 2016. Retrieved December 11, 2016. You need to use a D-SLR and a super wide-angle or fisheye lens and a sophisticated housing that has a dome, not a flat port. Underwater images are magnified by 25 percent, and the dome will correct for that. the technique requires a small f/stop, such as f/16 smaller 
  8. ^ "Underwater Photography Tips for Getting Started". Nikon. Nikon Inc. 2016. Retrieved December 11, 2016. 
  9. ^ Jim Clash (2016). "Photographer David Doubilet On Shooting Underwater, Pearl Harbor Wrecks". Forbes. Forbes. Retrieved December 11, 2016. 
  10. ^ "Undersea Image". David Doubilet. David Doubilet. 2016. Retrieved December 11, 2016. Jen Hayes and David Doubilet collaborate as a photographic team above and below water on project development, story production, feature articles and books 
  11. ^ "David Doubilet: Water Light Time". Phaidon. Phaidon. March 2016. Retrieved December 11, 2016. From the shores of the Galapagos to the Red Sea, from the Pacific Ocean to the fresh waters of North America, Water Light Time includes over twenty-five years of Doubilet's work, to reveal the mesmerizing beauty of more than thirty bodies of water rich with fascinating life forms. 
  12. ^ Ellingboe, Sonya (March 21, 2016). "Wonder of water will be focus of presentation". Highlands Ranch Herald. Highlands Ranch Herald. Retrieved December 11, 2016. The two collaborate on photography, story production, feature articles and books. He has published nearly 70 stories in National Geographic over the years and a number of books. Another recent volume focused on waters around Cuba. 
  13. ^ "Cuba's Underwater Jewels Are in Tourism's Path". NGS. NGS. 2016. Retrieved December 11, 2016. David Doubilet and Jennifer Hayes, who work as a team, have photographed the oceans from the Equator to polar regions. 
  14. ^ "Undersea Image". David Doubilet. David Doubilet. 2016. Retrieved December 11, 2016. 
  15. ^ Ellingboe, Sonya (March 21, 2016). "Wonder of water will be focus of presentation". Highlands Ranch Herald. Highlands Ranch Herald. Retrieved December 11, 2016. The two collaborate on photography, story production, feature articles and books. He has published nearly 70 stories in National Geographic over the years and a number of books. 
  16. ^ "Jennifer Hayes, Trustee". Sharks.org. The Shark Research Insitute. 2016. Retrieved December 11, 2016. they collaborate on project development, story production, featured articles and books. David and Jennifer recently collaborated on a new book Face to Face with Sharks. 
  17. ^ "Undersea Image". David Doubilet. David Doubilet. 2016. Retrieved December 11, 2016. Jen Hayes and David Doubilet collaborate as a photographic team above and below water on project development, story production, feature articles and books 
  18. ^ Ellingboe, Sonya (March 21, 2016). "Wonder of water will be focus of presentation". Highlands Ranch Herald. Highlands Ranch Herald. Retrieved December 11, 2016. The two collaborate on photography, story production, feature articles and books. He has published nearly 70 stories in National Geographic over the years and a number of books. The most recent volume focused on waters around Cuba. 
  19. ^ "David Doubilet and Jennifer Hayes Photography". Origin Magazine. Origin Magazine. 2016. Retrieved December 11, 2016. David and Jennifer work underwater from the equator to the poles to share the beauty and devastation of this hidden world that covers most of our planet. Their single goal is simple: to convince the unconvinced that as the sea goes so do we. 
  20. ^ http://www.ilcp.com/photographers/david-doubilet#
  21. ^ "David Doubilet And Jennifer Hayes". The Living Oceans. 2016. They are both members of the Explorers Club and contributing editors to Ocean related publications. He is a member of the Explorers Club and contributing editor (with Hayes) to Ocean related publications. Doubilet is also a Rolex Ambassador, a member of the Royal photographic Society and founding member of ILCP. 
  22. ^ "Honorary Fellowships". RPS. RPS. Retrieved December 11, 2016. 

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