Pactya

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Pactya or Paktye (Ancient Greek: Πακτύη) was an ancient Greek[1] city located in ancient Thrace, on the Thracian Chersonesus. It is cited in the Periplus of Pseudo-Scylax, in its recitation of the towns of the Thracian Chersonesus, along with Aegospotami, Cressa, Crithote and then Pactya, situated 36 stadia from Cardia.[2][3][4] It is said that Miltiades founded it.[5] Strabo places it on the Propontis between Crithote and Macron Teichos.[6] According to Herodotus, Miltiades the Elder ordered a wall built between Cardia, which was on the coast of Gulf of Melas and Pactya, which was on the Propontis side, to prevent invasion of the Chersonesus by the Apsinthii.[7] Alcibiades retired here the Athenians had for the second time deprived him of the command.[8] Pliny the Elder points out that both Cardia and Pactya later joined to form Lysimachia.[9]

Its site is located 2 miles (3.2 km) south of Bolayır, Turkey.[10][11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mogens Herman Hansen & Thomas Heine Nielsen (2004). "Thracian Chersonese". An inventory of archaic and classical poleis. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 907–908. ISBN 0-19-814099-1.
  2. ^ Periplus of Pseudo-Scylax 67.
  3. ^ Diodorus Siculus. Bibliotheca historica (Historical Library). 22.74.
  4. ^ Pliny. Naturalis Historia. 4.18.
  5. ^ Pseudo Scymnus or Pausanias of Damascus, Circuit of the Earth, § 696
  6. ^ Strabo. Geographica. 7, frag. 51, 53, 55. Page numbers refer to those of Isaac Casaubon's edition.
  7. ^ Herodotus. Histories. 6.36.
  8. ^ Nepos, Alc. 7
  9. ^ Pliny. Naturalis Historia. 4.48.
  10. ^ Richard Talbert, ed. (2000). Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World. Princeton University Press. p. 51, and directory notes accompanying.
  11. ^ Lund University. Digital Atlas of the Roman Empire.

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainSmith, William, ed. (1854–1857). "Pactye". Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography. London: John Murray.

Coordinates: 40°29′07″N 26°46′50″E / 40.485384°N 26.780688°E / 40.485384; 26.780688