Acrassus

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Acrassus or Akrassos was an ancient Roman and Byzantine-era city in Lydia (modern Turkey).[1][2][3][4] in the Roman province of Asia and Lydia.[5] [6] It was in the upper valley of the Caicus River, but its site is not located.[7]

Acrassus minted its own coins[8]

Bishopric[edit]

Acrassus was also the seat of a bishopric and remains a titular diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in the ecclesiastical province of Sardis. It is named after the ancient city and the current bishop is Đura Džudžar.[9]

Known bishops[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Joseph Bingham, Origines Ecclesiasticae; Or the Antiquities of the Christian Church and Other Works: In Nine Volumes, Volume 3 (Straker, 1843)
  2. ^ Antoine Augustin Bruzen de La Martinière, Le grand dictionnaire géographique et critique, Volume 6 (P. Gosse, 1736) p150.
  3. ^ François Morenas, Historical-portable dictionary of geography sacred ancient & modern; (Desaint & Saillant, rue St. Jean de Beauvais, 1759) p14.
  4. ^ m. Bruzen, Greater geographical dictionary, and criticism. Vol 1 (Martiniere, 1737) p61.
  5. ^ B. Cher Gruppe, Lydische Antike Stadt: Philadelphia, Sardis, Adramyttion, Thyatira, Tabala, Algiza, Pitanae, Acrassus, Lipara, Blaundos, Apollonis, Tracula (Books Llc (German), 2010) p105
  6. ^ Antoine Augustin Bruzen de La Martinière, Le grand dictionnaire géographique et critique, Volume 6 (P. Gosse, 1736) p150.
  7. ^ Richard Talbert, ed. (2000). Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World. Princeton University Press. p. 56, and directory notes accompanying.
  8. ^ Ancient Coinage of Lydia, Acrasus.
  9. ^ Le Petit Episcopologe, Issue 162, Number 13.942.