KCNK6

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Potassium channel, subfamily K, member 6
Identifiers
Symbols KCNK6 ; K2p6.1; KCNK8; TOSS; TWIK-2; TWIK2
External IDs OMIM603939 MGI1891291 HomoloGene31266 IUPHAR: K2P6.1 GeneCards: KCNK6 Gene
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE KCNK6 gnf1h00063 at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 9424 52150
Ensembl ENSG00000099337 ENSMUSG00000046410
UniProt Q9Y257 E9PXN4
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_004823 NM_001033525
RefSeq (protein) NP_004814 NP_001028697
Location (UCSC) Chr 19:
38.81 – 38.82 Mb
Chr 7:
29.22 – 29.23 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]

Potassium channel subfamily K member 6 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the KCNK6 gene.[1][2][3][4]

This gene encodes K2P6.1, one of the members of the superfamily of potassium channel proteins containing two pore-forming P domains. K2P6.1, considered an open rectifier, is widely expressed. It is stimulated by arachidonic acid, and inhibited by internal acidification and volatile anaesthetics.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chavez RA, Gray AT, Zhao BB, Kindler CH, Mazurek MJ, Mehta Y, Forsayeth JR, Yost CS (Apr 1999). "TWIK-2, a new weak inward rectifying member of the tandem pore domain potassium channel family". J Biol Chem 274 (12): 7887–92. doi:10.1074/jbc.274.12.7887. PMID 10075682. 
  2. ^ Gray AT, Kindler CH, Sampson ER, Yost CS (Jul 1999). "Assignment of KCNK6 encoding the human weak inward rectifier potassium channel TWIK-2 to chromosome band 19q13.1 by radiation hybrid mapping". Cytogenet Cell Genet 84 (3–4): 190–1. doi:10.1159/000015255. PMID 10393428. 
  3. ^ Goldstein SA, Bayliss DA, Kim D, Lesage F, Plant LD, Rajan S (Dec 2005). "International Union of Pharmacology. LV. Nomenclature and molecular relationships of two-P potassium channels". Pharmacol Rev 57 (4): 527–40. doi:10.1124/pr.57.4.12. PMID 16382106. 
  4. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: KCNK6 potassium channel, subfamily K, member 6". 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.