Uvular nasal

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Uvular nasal[edit]

Uvular nasal
ɴ
IPA number 120
Encoding
Entity (decimal) ɴ
Unicode (hex) U+0274
X-SAMPA N\
Kirshenbaum n"
Braille ⠔ (braille pattern dots-35) ⠝ (braille pattern dots-1345)
Sound

The uvular nasal is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents this sound is ɴ.

Features[edit]

Features of the uvular nasal:

  • Its manner of articulation is occlusive, which means it is produced by obstructing airflow in the vocal tract. Since the consonant is also nasal, the blocked airflow is redirected through the nose.
  • Its place of articulation is uvular, which means it is articulated with the back of the tongue (the dorsum) at the uvula.
  • Its phonation is voiced, which means the vocal cords vibrate during the articulation. However, in some languages (like Swiss German) it can just mean that this consonant is pronounced shorter and weaker than its voiceless counterpart, while its voicedness or lack thereof is not relevant. In such cases it's more accurate to call such sounds lenis or lax.
  • It is a nasal consonant, which means air is allowed to escape through the nose, either exclusively (nasal stops) or in addition to through the mouth.
  • Because the sound is not produced with airflow over the tongue, the centrallateral dichotomy does not apply.
  • The airstream mechanism is pulmonic, which means it is articulated by pushing air solely with the lungs and diaphragm, as in most sounds.

Occurrence[edit]

Language Word IPA Meaning Notes
Armenian անխելք [ɑɴˈχɛlkʰ] 'brainless' Allophone of /n/ before a uvular consonant in informal speech.
Dutch Netherlandic aangenaam [ˈaːɴχəˌnaːm] 'pleasant' Allophone of /n/ and /ŋ/ in dialects that use [χ]. Can be pronounced [n] and [ŋ] instead, especially in formal speech.
Georgian ზიყი [ziɴqʼi] 'hip joint' Allophone of /n/.
Inuit Inuvialuktun namunganmun [namuŋaɴmuɴ] 'to where?' See Inuit phonology
Japanese[1] 日本 nihon About this sound [n̠ʲihoɴ]  'Japan' See Japanese phonology
Kalaallisut paarngorpoq [paaɴːoʁpoq] 'crawls'
Klallam sqəyáyŋəxʷ [sqəˈjajɴəxʷ] 'big tree' contrasts with glottalized form.
Peruvian Quechua sonqo [ˈs̠oɴ.qo] 'heart' Allophone of /n/.
Spanish[2] enjuto [ẽ̞ɴˈχuto̞] 'dry' Allophone of /n/. See Spanish phonology

Voiced post-velar nasal[edit]

Voiced post-velar nasal
ŋ̄
ɴ̟

The voiced post-velar nasal or voiced pre-uvular nasal is a consonant that occurs as a phoneme in Yanyuwa.

Features[edit]

Features of the voiced post-velar nasal:

  • Its manner of articulation is occlusive, which means it is produced by obstructing airflow in the vocal tract. Since the consonant is also nasal, the blocked airflow is redirected through the nose.
  • Its place of articulation is post-velar, which means it is articulated with the back of the tongue raised between the soft palate and the uvula.
  • Its phonation is voiced, which means the vocal cords vibrate during the articulation. However, in some languages (like Swiss German) it can just mean that this consonant is pronounced shorter and weaker than its voiceless counterpart, while its voicedness or lack thereof is not relevant. In such cases it's more accurate to call such sounds lenis or lax.
  • It is a nasal consonant, which means air is allowed to escape through the nose, either exclusively (nasal stops) or in addition to through the mouth.
  • Because the sound is not produced with airflow over the tongue, the centrallateral dichotomy does not apply.
  • The airstream mechanism is pulmonic, which means it is articulated by pushing air solely with the lungs and diaphragm, as in most sounds.

Occurrence[edit]

Language Word IPA Meaning Notes
Yanyuwa[3] [waŋ̄ulu] 'adolescent boy' Contrasts with pre-velar nasal.


See also[edit]

References[edit]

Bibliography[edit]