Timeline of Oxford

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city, University and colleges of Oxford, England.

Pre-history[edit]

  • Activity from the Mesolithic period onwards, attested by archaeological finds across the city.[1]
  • Bronze Age burials at locations including The Hamel, Radcliffe Infirmary, Banbury Road and several university buildings.[1]
  • Bronze Age barrow complexes at locations including the University Parks.[1]
  • Wide-ranging Iron Age and Roman remains, suggesting continued occupation from pre-conquest period into the Roman era.[1]

Recorded history, prior to 13th century[edit]

City coat of arms in Town Hall
University seal
St George's Tower of the Castle
"Friar Bacon's Study" at Folly Bridge, demolished 1779[21]

13th century[edit]

14th century[edit]

15th century[edit]

New College Dining Hall

16th century[edit]

  • 1548 – March: Florentine evangelical reformer Peter Martyr Vermigli is appointed Regius Professor of Divinity in place of Richard Smyth. He is forced to flee the city in September 1553.[49]
  • 1550 – The university's Duke Humfrey's Library stripped of "superstitious books and images".
  • 1555
  • 1556 – 21 March: The third of the Oxford martyrs, Thomas Cranmer, deposed Archbishop of Canterbury, is burned at the stake for treason[24] having professed his faith at St Mary's.
  • 1562 – Grazing rites of freemen of Oxford to Port Meadow and of residents of Wolvercote to Wolvercote Common are confirmed.[50]
  • 1566 – 31 August–6 September: Visit of Queen Elizabeth, staying at Christ Church. On 2 September at a performance of Richard Edwardes' play Palamon and Arcite before her the stage collapses causing three deaths, but the show goes on and "the Queen laughed heartily thereat".[51] On 6 September the first honorary degrees to be awarded at a ceremony in Oxford are conferred on Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, and eleven others, who receive the MA.[52] The Queen grants a royal crest to the city coat of arms.
  • 1571 – 27 June: Establishment of Jesus College "within the City and University of Oxford of Queen Elizabeth's foundation" on the site of White Hall by Welsh cleric and lawyer Hugh Price, the first college established as an Anglican institution at its foundation.[22]
  • 1577 – 6 July: "Black Assize" results in an outbreak of epidemic typhus killing around 300 in the city.[53] Rowland Jenkins, an Oxford stationer, is condemned to have his ears cut off for distributing Popish books.[35]
  • 1580 – 6 April: Dover Straits earthquake felt in Oxford.[7]
  • 1581
    • Undergraduates are required to subscribe to the Thirty-Nine Articles of the Anglican Church.[35]
    • 27 June: Copies of Edmund Campion's Decem Rationes, arguments against the validity of the Anglican Church, printed clandestinely at Stonor Park, are found on the benches of the University Church of St Mary the Virgin.[35]
  • 1582 – February: Meleager, a Latin play on the mythological figure of Meleager by "Gulielmus Gagerus" (William Gager), is performed by members of Christ Church.
  • 1583 – 11 June: Rivales, another Latin play by Gager, is acted by members of Christ Church; it is criticised for its "filth". The following day they present another, Dido.[54]
  • 1585 – 3 April: The Queen's College is incorporated as a full college under this name under an Act of Parliament obtained by its Provost, Henry Robinson.
  • 1586 – Oxford University Press is recognised by decree of the Star Chamber.[55]
  • 1588 – Balliol College is granted a royal charter.[32]
  • 1589
  • 1592 – 22–28 September: Visit of Queen Elizabeth, staying at Christ Church.[56] On 26 September members of Christ Church revive William Gager's 1583 Latin play Rivales before her.
  • c. 1594 – Mound erected as a feature in New College garden.
  • 1598 – 23 February: Thomas Bodley refounds the university's Duke Humfrey's Library.[24]

17th century[edit]

Old Schools Quadrangle, Bodleian Library
Brasenose in c.1674, from Loggan's Oxonia Illustrata

18th century[edit]

Broad Street looking east towards (right to left) the Old Ashmolean Building, the Sheldonian Theatre and the Clarendon Building

19th century[edit]

On the river – an early view
First two women's colleges
The HighPhotochrom of c.1900

20th century[edit]

1913 "Bullnose" Morris Oxford
Salters steamer Wargrave (1913) by Folly Bridge
Wartime aircraft scrap dump at Cowley as portrayed in Paul Nash's Totes Meer[216]
Oxford's dreaming spires from South Park

21st century[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

Osney Cemetery (on the site of the Abbey)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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Further reading[edit]

Published prior to the 19th century[edit]

  • David Loggan (1675). Oxonia illustrata. Oxford: at the Sheldonian Theatre.
  • Anthony Wood (1674). Historia et antiquitates Universitatis Oxoniensis. Oxford: at the Sheldonian Theatre.
  • Anthony Wood (antiquary) (1691). Athenæ Oxonienses: an Exact History of all the Writers and Bishops who have had their Education in the University of Oxford from 1500 to 1690. London.

Published in the 19th century[edit]

Published in the 20th century[edit]

Published in the 21st century[edit]

  • Daniel A. Bell; Avner de-Shalit (2011). "Oxford". Spirit of Cities: Why the Identity of a City Matters in a Global Age. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. ISBN 9780691151441.
  • L. W. B. Brockliss (2016). The University of Oxford: a history. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-924356-3.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 51°27′00″N 1°09′07″W / 51.450°N 1.152°W / 51.450; -1.152