List of Nobel laureates affiliated with Cornell University

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As of October 2019, 58 Nobel Laureates have been affiliated with Cornell University. The building pictured is Goldwin Smith Hall.

This list of Nobel laureates affiliated with Cornell University comprehensively shows the alumni, faculty members as well as researchers of Cornell University who were awarded the Nobel Prize or the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences. The Nobel Prizes are awarded annually by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, the Karolinska Institute, and the Norwegian Nobel Committee to individuals who make outstanding contributions in the fields of chemistry, physics, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine.[1] They were established by the 1895 will of Alfred Nobel, which dictates that the awards should be administered by the Nobel Foundation. Another prize, the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, was established in 1968 by the Sveriges Riksbank, the central bank of Sweden, for contributors to the field of economics.[2]

As of October 2019, 58 Nobel laureates have been affiliated with Cornell University as alumni, faculty members and researchers, and 50 of them are officially listed as "Cornell's Nobel Laureates" by the university.[3] Among the 58 laureates, 18 are Cornell alumni (graduate and attendees), 19 are long-term faculty members and 25 are researchers (four overlaps).[4] Subject-wise, the Nobel Prize categories of Physics and Physiology or Medicine account for 21 and 14 awards to Cornell-affiliated laureates, respectively. People affiliated with Cornell also have received 12 Nobel Prizes for Chemistry, 4 for Literature, 5 for Economics, and 2 Nobel Peace Prizes.[4]

Inclusion criteria[edit]

Cornell University

The university affiliations in this list are all official academic affiliations such as degree programs and official academic employment. Non-academic affiliations such as advisory committee and administrative staff are generally excluded. The official academic affiliations fall into three categories: 1) Alumni (graduates and attendees), 2) Long-term Academic Staff, and 3) Short-term Academic Staff. Graduates are defined as those who hold Bachelor's, Master's, Doctorate, or equivalent degrees from Cornell, while attendees are those who formally enrolled in a degree program at Cornell but did not complete the program; thus, honorary degrees, posthumous degrees, summer attendees, exchange students, and auditing students are excluded. The category of "Long-term Academic Staff" consists of tenure/tenure-track and equivalent academic positions, while that of "Short-term Academic Staff" consists of lecturers (without tenure), postdoctoral researchers (postdocs), visiting professors/scholars (visitors), and equivalent academic positions. At Cornell, the specific academic title solely determines the type of affiliation, regardless of the actual time the position was held by a laureate.

Further explanations on "visitors" under "Short-term Academic Staff" are presented as follows. 1) All informal or personal visits are excluded from the list; 2) all employment-based visiting positions, which carry teaching/research duties, are included as affiliations in the list; 3) as for award/honor-based visiting positions, to minimize controversy this list takes a conservative view and includes the positions as affiliations only if the laureates were required to assume employment-level duty (teaching/research) or the laureates specifically classified the visiting positions as "affiliation" or similar in reliable sources such as their curriculum vita. To be specific, some award/honor-based visiting positions such as the "Baker Lectureship" at Cornell University are awards/honors without employment-level duty.[5] In particular, attending meetings and giving public lectures, talks or non-curricular seminars at Cornell University is not a form of employment-level duty. Finally, summer visitors are generally excluded from the list unless summer work yielded significant end products such as research publications and components of Nobel-winning work, since summer terms are not part of formal academic years.

The "A.D White Professorship-at-Large (A.D.W Professor)" at Cornell University is an academic appointment which has a definite duration of appointment (six years).[6] This is similar to adjunct professorship instead of usual visiting professorship (note that the University Count considers the A.D White Professors as full-time academic staff).

Nobel laureates by category[edit]

Nobel Prize in Physics[edit]

Year Image Laureate Relation Rationale
1937 George Paget Thomson.jpg George Paget Thomson Non–Resident Lecturer, 1929-1930 "for their experimental discovery of the diffraction of electrons by crystals"
1944 Isidor Isaac Rabi.jpg Isidor Isaac Rabi B.Chem. 1919

Graduate study 1921–23 (transferred)

"for his resonance method for recording the magnetic properties of atomic nuclei"[7]
1965 Richard Feynman ID badge.png Richard Feynman Professor of Physics, 1945-1950 "their fundamental work in quantum electrodynamics, with deep-ploughing consequences for the physics of elementary particles"
1967 Hans Bethe.jpg Hans Bethe Professor of Physics, 1935-2005 "for his contributions to the theory of nuclear reactions, especially his discoveries concerning the energy production in stars"[8]
1970 YoungAlfven.jpg Hannes Alfvén Distinguished Professor in Engineering "for fundamental work and discoveries in magnetohydro-dynamics with fruitful applications in different parts of plasma physics"[9]
1972 John Robert Schrieffer.jpg John Robert Schrieffer A.D. White Professor-at-Large, 1969–1975 "for [his] jointly developed theory of superconductivity, usually called the BCS-theory".[10]
1973 Brian Josephson, March 2004.jpg Brian David Josephson

Co-recipient with Leo Esaki and Ivar Giaever

NSF Fellow, 1971–1972[11] "for their experimental discoveries regarding tunneling phenomena in semiconductors and superconductors, respectively" and the other half to Brian David Josephson "for his theoretical predictions of the properties of a supercurrent through a tunnel barrier, in particular those phenomena which are generally known as the Josephson effects"[12]
1979 Sheldon Glashow at Harvard.jpg Sheldon Glashow

Co-recipient with Abdus Salam and Steven Weinberg

B.A., 1954 "for their contributions to the theory of the unified weak and electromagnetic interaction between elementary particles, including, inter alia, the prediction of the weak neutral current"[13]
1979 Steven-weinberg.jpg Steven Weinberg

Co-recipient with Abdus Salam and Sheldon Glashow

B.A. 1954 "for their contributions to the theory of the unified weak and electromagnetic interaction between elementary particles, including, inter alia, the prediction of the weak neutral current"[13]
1982 Kenneth G. Wilson Professor of Physics, 1963-1988 "for his theory for critical phenomena in connection with phase transitions"[14]
1991 Pierre-Gilles Rice University.jpg Pierre-Gilles de Gennes Served on the Cornell faculty as A.D. White Professor-at-Large 1977–1983 and Bethe Lecturer in Physics 1989–1990 "for discovering that methods developed for studying order phenomena in simple systems can be generalized to more complex forms of matter, in particular to liquid crystals and polymers"[15]
1993 Russell Alan Hulse.jpg Russell Alan Hulse

Co-recipient with Joseph Hooton Taylor, Jr.

Scholar at Arecibo Observatory of Cornell University in Puerto Rico 1974[16] "for the discovery of a new type of pulsar, a discovery that has opened up new possibilities for the study of gravitation"[17]
1996 Nobel Laureate David Morris Lee in 2007.jpg David Morris Lee

Co-recipient with Douglas D. Osheroff and Robert C. Richardson

Professor of Physics, 1959–2009 "for their discovery of superfluidity in helium-3"[18]
1996 Douglas Osheroff.jpg Douglas D. Osheroff

Co-recipient with David M. Lee and Robert C. Richardson

M.S. 1971 - Physics

Ph.D. 1973 – Physics

"for their discovery of superfluidity in helium-3"[18]
1996 Robert Coleman Richardson.jpg Robert Coleman Richardson

Co-recipient with Douglas D. Osheroff and David M. Lee

Research Associate, 1966–1967

Professor of Physics, 1968–2013

"for their discovery of superfluidity in helium-3"[18]
2002 Nobel Laureate Sir Anthony James Leggett in 2007.jpg Anthony James Leggett Visiting Professor, 04/1973, 07/1974
Bethe Lecturer, 04/1980
Visiting Scientist, 01/1983–08/1983[19]
"for pioneering contributions to the theory of superconductors and superfluids"
2013 Francois Englert.jpg François Englert

Co-recipient with Peter Higgs

Research associate and assistant professor 1959-1961 "for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles, and which recently was confirmed through the discovery of the predicted fundamental particle"[20]
2016 DavidThouless 1995 UW.jpg David J. Thouless

Co-recipient with Duncan Haldane and John M. Kosterlitz

Ph.D. 1958 "for theoretical discoveries of topological phase transitions and topological phases of matter"[21]
2016 Jkosterl.jpg John M. Kosterlitz

Co-recipient with Duncan Haldane and David J. Thouless

Postdoctoral researcher 1973-1974 "for theoretical discoveries of topological phase transitions and topological phases of matter"[22]
2017 Kip Thorne at Caltech.jpg Kip Stephen Thorne

Co-recipient with Rainer Weiss and Barry C. Barish

A.D. White Professor-at-Large, 1986–1992
Visiting Senior Research Associate, 01/1977 – 06/1977
Hans Bethe Lecturer 1986
Yervant Terzian Memorial Lecture, 2016[23]
"for decisive contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves"[24][25]
2018 Arthur Ashkin Ph.D. 1952 [26] "for groundbreaking inventions in the field of laser physics" “for the optical tweezers and their application to biological systems”[27][28]

Nobel Prize in Chemistry[edit]

Year Image Laureate Relation Rationale
1936 Debye100.jpg Peter Debye Professor of Chemistry, 1940-1952 "for his contributions to the study of molecular structure," primarily referring to his work on dipole moments and X-ray diffraction
1944 Otto Hahn 1970.jpg Otto Hahn George Fisher Baker Non-Resident Lecturer in Chemistry 1933[29] "for his discovery of the fission of heavy atomic nuclei."
1946 James Batcheller Sumner.jpg James B. Sumner Professor of Biochemistry/Nutrition 1929–1955; took emeritus status in 1955
1954 L Pauling.jpg Linus Pauling[30][31] George Fisher Baker Non-Resident Lecturer in Chemistry 1937–1938
Messenger Lecturer 1959
"for his research into the nature of the chemical bond and its application to the elucidation of the structure of complex substances"
1955 Vincent du Vigneaud.jpg Vincent du Vigneaud Professor, Cornell Medical College 1938–1967
Professor Emeritus, Ithaca campus 1967–1974
"for his work on biochemically important sulphur compounds, especially for the first synthesis of a polypeptide hormone"
1967 Eigen,Manfred 1996 Göttingen.jpg Manfred Eigen A.D. White Professor-at-Large
1971 Herzberg,Gerhard 1952 London.jpg Gerhard Herzberg[32][33][34] George Fisher Baker Non-Resident Lecturer in Chemistry 1968 "for his contributions to the knowledge of electronic structure and geometry of molecules, particularly free radicals"
1974 Paul Flory Chemistry faculty, 1948–1957 "for his fundamental achievements, both theoretical and experimental, in the physical chemistry of the macromolecules"[35]
1981 Roald Hoffmann.jpg Roald Hoffmann

Co-recipient with Kenichi Fukui

Professor of Chemistry, 1965–Present "for their theories, developed independently, concerning the course of chemical reactions"[36]
1991 Richard R Ernst.jpg Richard R. Ernst A.D. White Professor-at-Large, 1998 "for his contributions to the development of the methodology of high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy"[37]
2014 Eric Betzig (cropped).jpg Eric Betzig M.S. 1985, Ph.D. 1988 - Applied and Engineering Physics "for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy"[38]
2014 WE Moerner.jpg William E. Moerner M.S. 1978, Ph.D. 1982 - Physics "for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy"[39]
2017 Joachim Frank EM1B8792 (27115577469).jpg Joachim Frank

Co-recipient with Jacques Dubochet and Richard Henderson

Postdoctoral researcher 1972[40][41][42] "for developing cryo-electron microscopy for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution"[43]

Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine[edit]

Year Image Laureate Relation Rationale
1944 Herbert Spencer Gasser nobel.jpg Herbert Spencer Gasser Cornell Medical College faculty 1931–1934
1946 HJ Muller 1952.jpg Hermann Joseph Muller Cornell graduate student 1911–1912
1953 Portrait of Fritz Albert Lipmann (1899-1986), Biochemist (2551001689).jpg Fritz Albert Lipmann Research Associate, Cornell Medical College 1939–1941 "for his discovery of co-enzyme A and its importance for intermediary metabolism"
1967 HKHartline.png Haldan Keffer Hartline Associate Professor of Physiology, Cornell Medical College 1940–1941
1968 Robert Holley-crop.jpg Robert W. Holley

Co-recipient with H. Gobind Khorana and Marshall W. Nirenberg

Ph.D., 1946
Professor of Organic Chemistry, 1948–1966
"for their interpretation of the genetic code and its function in protein synthesis"[44]
1968 Har Gobind Khorana nobel.jpg Har Gobind Khorana A.D. White Professor-at-Large, 1974–1980
1983 Barbara McClintock (1902-1992) shown in her laboratory in 1947.jpg Barbara McClintock B.S., 1923
M.A., 1925
Ph.D., 1927
Instructor in botany, 1927–1931
Andrew D. White Professor-at-Large, 1965–1974
"for her discovery of mobile genetic elements"[45]
1989 HEVarmus.jpg Harold Varmus Professor of Medicine, 2015-Present "for [his] discovery of the cellular origin of retroviral oncogenes"
1998 Drfurchgott.jpg Robert F. Furchgott Research Associate (Medicine)/Instructor (Physiology and Biophysics/Assistant Professor Medicine), 1941–1949 "for [his] discoveries concerning nitric oxide as a signalling molecule in the cardiovascular system"[46]
2000 Paul Greengard.jpg Paul Greengard A.D. White Professor-at-Large, 1981–1987 "for [his] discoveries concerning signal transduction in the nervous system"[47]
2009 JSzostak.jpg Jack W. Szostak

Co-recipient with Elizabeth H. Blackburn and Carol W. Greider

Ph.D. 1977 - Biochemistry "for the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase"[48]
2018 James P. Allison (2015).JPG James P. Allison Professor of Weill Cornell Medicine, Cornell University, 2004–2012 "for discovery of cancer therapy by inhibition of negative immune regulation"

Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics[edit]

Year Image Laureate Relation Rationale
1993 Robert William Fogel.jpg Robert Fogel B.A., 1948 "for having renewed research in economic history by applying economic theory and quantitative methods in order to explain economic and institutional change"[49]
1998 Amartya Sen 20071128 cologne.jpg Amartya Sen A.D. White Professor-at-Large, 1978–1984 "for his contributions to welfare economics"[50]
2003 Robert F. Engle.jpg Robert F. Engle M.S., 1966,

Ph.D., 1969

"for methods of analyzing economic time series with time-varying volatility (ARCH)"[51]
2017 Richard Thaler Chatham.jpg Richard Thaler Professor of Economics and the Henrietta Johnson Louis Professor of Management, Johnson Graduate School of Management, Cornell University, 1978–1995[52][53][54][55] "for his contributions to behavioural economics"[56]

Nobel Prize in Literature[edit]

Year Image Laureate Relation Rationale
1938 Pearl Buck.jpg Pearl S. Buck M.A., 1925 "for her rich and truly epic descriptions of peasant life in China and for her biographical masterpieces"[57]
1986 Soyinka, Wole (1934).jpg Wole Soyinka Senior Fellow, Society for the Humanities, 1985
Goldwin Smith professor for African Studies and Theatre Arts, 1988-1991[58][59]
"who in a wide cultural perspective and with poetic overtones fashions the drama of existence"[60]
1990 Paz0.jpg Octavio Paz A.D. White Professor-at-Large, 1972-1974 "for impassioned writing with wide horizons, characterized by sensuous intelligence and humanistic integrity"[61]
1993 Toni Morrison 2008-2.jpg Toni Morrison M.A. 1955 - English

A.D. White Professor-at-Large, 1997–2003

"who in novels characterized by visionary force and poetic import, gives life to an essential aspect of American reality"[62]

Nobel Peace Prize[edit]

Year Image Laureate Relation Rationale
1946 John Raleigh Mott, 1910.jpg John Mott

Co-recipient with Emily Greene Balch

B.S. 1888 - Philosophy "Chairman, International Missionary Council; President, World Alliance of Young Men's Christian Associations"[63]
1962 L Pauling.jpg Linus Pauling[30][31] George Fischer Baker Non-Resident Lecturer in Chemistry 1937–1938
Messenger Lecturer 1959
1970 Norman Borlaug.jpg Norman Borlaug A.D. White Professor-at-Large, 1982–1988

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]