Khirbat Al-Lawz

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Khirbat Al-Lawz
JerusalemFarWest1870s.jpg
Map of Khirbat Al-Lawz-area, 1870's
Khirbat Al-Lawz is located in Mandatory Palestine
Khirbat Al-Lawz
Khirbat Al-Lawz
Arabic خربة اللوز
Name meaning the ruin of the almond[1]
Subdistrict Jerusalem
Coordinates 31°46′04″N 35°06′41″E / 31.76778°N 35.11139°E / 31.76778; 35.11139Coordinates: 31°46′04″N 35°06′41″E / 31.76778°N 35.11139°E / 31.76778; 35.11139
Palestine grid 160/130
Population 450[2][3] (1945)
Area 4,502 dunams
Date of depopulation July 13, 1948

Khirbat Al-Lawz was a Palestinian Arab village in the Jerusalem Subdistrict. It was depopulated during the 1948 Arab-Israeli War on July 13, 1948 by the Har'el Brigade of Operation Dani. It was located 11 km west of Jerusalem, situated north of Wadi al-Sarar.

History[edit]

Ottoman era[edit]

In 1838 Khirbet el-Lauz was noted as a Muslim village, part of Beni Hasan area, located west of Jerusalem.[4]

In 1863, Victor Guérin found it to be a hamlet of eighty inhabitants, most of them shepherds.[5]

Socin found from an official Ottoman village list from about 1870 that chirbet el-loz had a population of 83, with a total of 38 houses, though the population count included men, only.[6] Hartmann found that chirbet el-loz had 30 houses.[7]

In 1883, the Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine described Khurbet el Loz as "a village of moderate size on the slope of a high ridge near the summit. It has a sort of terrace below it, and stands some 800 feet above the southern valley. There are rock-cut tombs at the place."[8]

British Mandate era[edit]

In the 1922 census of Palestine conducted by the British Mandate authorities, Kherbet al-Ley had a population of 234 Muslims,[9] increasing in the 1931 census to 315 Muslims, in 67 houses.[10]

In 1945, the village had a population of 450 Muslims,[2] while the total land area was 4,502 dunams, according to an official land and population survey.[3] Of this, 728 were used for plantations and irrigable land, 693 for cereals,[11] while 13 dunams were classified as built-up areas.[12]

Khirbat al-Lawz had a shrine dedicated to a local sage known as al-Shaykh Salama.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 308
  2. ^ a b Department of Statistics, 1945, p. 25
  3. ^ a b Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 57
  4. ^ Robinson and Smith, 1841, vol 3, Appendix 2, p. 123
  5. ^ Guérin, 1869, pp. 4-5
  6. ^ Socin, 1879, p. 150
  7. ^ Hartmann, 1883, p. 122
  8. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1883, p. 21
  9. ^ Barron, 1923, Table VII, Sub-district of Jerusalem, p. 14
  10. ^ Mills, 1932, p. 41
  11. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 103
  12. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 153

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]