Umm ash Shauf

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Umm al-Shawf
Umm al-Shawf is located in Mandatory Palestine
Umm al-Shawf
Umm al-Shawf
Arabic أُم الشوف
Name meaning The place with the harrow[1]
Also spelled Umm al Shauf
Subdistrict Haifa
Coordinates 32°33′12″N 35°02′55″E / 32.55333°N 35.04861°E / 32.55333; 35.04861Coordinates: 32°33′12″N 35°02′55″E / 32.55333°N 35.04861°E / 32.55333; 35.04861
Palestine grid 154/217
Population 480[2][3] (1945)
Area 7,426[3] dunams
Date of depopulation May 12–14, 1948[4]
Cause(s) of depopulation Military assault by Yishuv forces
Current localities Givat Nili[5]

Umm al-Shawf or Umm ash Shauf (Arabic: أُم الشوف‎, Umm esh Shauf) was a Palestinian Arab village located 29.5 km south of Haifa, on the sloping section of Wadi al-Marah. It was depopulated as a result of a military assault between May 12–14, just before the outbreak of the 1948 Arab-Israeli war.

History[edit]

In 1859 the population was 150, and the cultivation was 21 feddans.[6]

In 1882, the Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine described Umm ash Shuf as: "a small village well supplied with water from two springs on the north, on which side is a little garden."[6]

A population list from about 1887 showed that Umm esh Shuf had about 375 inhabitants, all Muslim.[7]

British Mandate era[edit]

In the 1922 census of Palestine, onducted by the British Mandate authorities, Umm al-Shuf had a population of 252 Muslims,[8] increasing in the 1931 census to 353 Muslims, in a total of 73 houses.[9]

In 1945, it had a population of 480 Muslim inhabitants,[2] with 7,426 dunams of land.[3] Of this, 107 dunums of land were for plantations and irrigable land, 6,175 for cereals,[10] while 31 dunams were classified as built-up land.[11]

1948 and aftermath[edit]

Umm ash Shauf became depopulated after an assault from IZL troops in early May, 1948.[12]

IZL troops searched some refugees from Umm ash Shauf, and found one pistol and one rifle. They took seven young men from the refugees aside, and when none of them admitted to owning the weapons, they were all executed.[13]

Following the war the area was incorporated into the State of Israel and the moshav of Givat Nili was founded in 1953 on the village's land, south of the village site.[5]

In 1992 the village site was described: "Piles of stone debris from the houses are scattered about the site, which is overgrown with cactuses, thorns, and bushes. The shrine of Shaykh 'Abd Allah still stands."[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 154
  2. ^ a b Department of Statistics, 1945, p. 15
  3. ^ a b c Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 49
  4. ^ Morris, 2004, p. xviii village #157. Also gives cause of depopulation.
  5. ^ a b c Khalidi, 1992, p. 199
  6. ^ a b Conder and Kitchener, 1882, SWP II, p. 43
  7. ^ Schumacher, 1888, p. 181
  8. ^ Barron, 1923, Table XI, Sub-district of Haifa, p. 34
  9. ^ Mills, 1932, p. 97
  10. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 92
  11. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 142
  12. ^ Morris, 2004, p. 243 notes #613 to 615, p. 297
  13. ^ Morris, 2004, p. 244 note #617, p. 297

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]