Hulayqat

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Hulayqat
Hulayqat.jpg
Hulayqat, before 1948
Arabic حليقات
Name meaning the circles[1]
Subdistrict Gaza
Palestine grid 116/112
Population 420[2][3] (1945)
Date of depopulation May 12, 1948[4]
Cause(s) of depopulation Influence of nearby town's fall

Hulayqat was a Palestinian Arab village in the Gaza Subdistrict. It was depopulated during the 1947–1948 Civil War in Mandatory Palestine. It was located 20.5 km northeast of Gaza.

History[edit]

Hulayqat had numerous khirbas which contained cisterns, a pool, and fragments of marble and pottery.[5]

Ottoman era[edit]

In 1883, the Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine described it as a "small village on a flat slope, with a high sandy hill to the west. It has cisterns and a pond, with a small garden to the west.”[6]

British Mandate era[edit]

In the 1922 census of Palestine, conducted by the British Mandate authorities, Hukiqat had a population of 251 inhabitants, all Muslims,[7] increasing in the 1931 census to 285, still all Muslims, in 61 houses.[8]

In 1945 Huleiqat had a population of 420 Muslims,[2] with a total of 7,063 dunams of land, according to an official land and population survey.[3] Of this, 115 dunams were used for plantations and irrigable land, 6,636 for cereals,[9] while they had 18 dunams as built-up land.[10]

In 1947, an oil drilling project commenced in Hulayqat employing 300 Arab workers.[11]

1948, aftermath[edit]

The village was first captured by the Israeli army on 13 May during Operation Barak and depopulated.[12][13] On 8 July, it was retaken by the Egyptian army. A well-fortified battalion of the 4th Brigade was stationed there later reinforced by more troops.[14] and some of the villagers returned to their homes. It was finally captured on 19 October by the Giv'ati Brigade during Operation Yoav.[5]

According to the Palestinian historian Walid Khalidi, the ruin of the village in 1992 was partially forested with sycamore, Christ's-thorn trees and cactus. One of the old roads had been paved.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 367
  2. ^ a b Department of Statistics, 1945, p. 31
  3. ^ a b Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 45
  4. ^ Morris, 2004, p. xix, village #317. Also gives cause for depopulation
  5. ^ a b c Khalidi, 1992, p. 104
  6. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1883, SWP III, p. 260
  7. ^ Barron, 1923, Table V, Sub-district of Gaza, p. 8
  8. ^ Mills, 1932, p. 3
  9. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 87
  10. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 137
  11. ^ Drilling begins near Gaza
  12. ^ Tal, 2004, p. 174
  13. ^ Morris, 2004, p. 258
  14. ^ Tal, 2004, p. 385

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 31°35′53″N 34°38′59″E / 31.59806°N 34.64972°E / 31.59806; 34.64972