Khirbat al-Zababida

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Khirbat al-Zababida
Khirbat al-Zababida is located in Mandatory Palestine
Khirbat al-Zababida
Khirbat al-Zababida
Arabic خربة الزبابدة
Name meaning The ruin of Zebabdeh (a family name)[1]
Subdistrict Tulkarm
Coordinates 32°15′11″N 34°50′14″E / 32.25306°N 34.83722°E / 32.25306; 34.83722Coordinates: 32°15′11″N 34°50′14″E / 32.25306°N 34.83722°E / 32.25306; 34.83722
Palestine grid 134/184
Area 10,879[2][3] dunams
Date of depopulation May 15, 1948
Current localities Yakum[4] Ga'ash[4]

Khirbat al-Zababida was a Palestinian Arab village in the Tulkarm Subdistrict. It was depopulated during the 1948 Arab–Israeli War on May 15, 1948. It was located 20 kilometres (12 mi) southwest of Tulkarm, south of the Wadi al-Faliq. Khirbat al-Zababida was mostly destroyed except for four deserted houses.

History[edit]

In 1870, Victor Guérin noted it as an old, rather ruined hamlet. It was located on a small hill, and had a path leading to a harbour, where water melons were being shipped out.[5]

In 1882, the Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine (SWP) found at Kh. ez Zebabdeh "a small modern ruined village".[6]

British Mandate era[edit]

By 1944/45 the village jurisdiction was 10,879 dunams, of which 4,626 was Arab owned, 4,884 was Jewish owned, while 1,369 was publicly owned.[3] Of this, Arabs used 344 dunums of land used for citrus and bananas, 3,839 dunums to cereals, 215 dunums were irrigated or used for orchards,[7] while a total of 1,750 dunams were classified as uncultivable areas.[8]

1948, aftermath[edit]

The Israeli settlement of Yakum was established in 1947 on village land,[4] while Ga'ash was established in 1951, also on village land.[4]

In 1992 the village site was described: "The site is deserted and overgrown with wild vegetation and trees. All but four of the houses have been destroyed. These four houses still have intact roofs. Three of them were made of cement bricks, and one of hard igneous stone. Iron girders from five destroyed houses protrude from piles of stones.[..] A picnic site has been built for Kibbutz Yaqum on the edge of a natural pond."[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 175
  2. ^ Department of Statistics, 1945, p. 21
  3. ^ a b Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 75
  4. ^ a b c d e Khalidi, 1992, p. 567
  5. ^ Guérin, 1875, p. 383
  6. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1882, SWP II, p.141
  7. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 95
  8. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 176

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]