Khirbat Lid

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Lid, Khirbat)
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Lid
Lid is located in Mandatory Palestine
Lid
Lid
Arabic خربة لِد العوادين
Name meaning From personal name[1]
Also spelled Khirbet Lid al Awadin[2]
Subdistrict Haifa
Coordinates 32°36′49″N 35°13′27″E / 32.61361°N 35.22417°E / 32.61361; 35.22417Coordinates: 32°36′49″N 35°13′27″E / 32.61361°N 35.22417°E / 32.61361; 35.22417
Palestine grid 171/224
Population 640[3][4] (1945)
Date of depopulation Not known[2]
Current localities HaYogev[5]

Lid was a Palestinian village in the Haifa Subdistrict. It was depopulated during the 1947–1948 Civil War in Mandatory Palestine on April 9, 1948. It was located 32 km southeast of Haifa.

History[edit]

The Khirbat al-Manatir contained artifacts from the Byzantine period.[5]

Ottoman era[edit]

In 1881, the Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine (SWP) found at Ludd "traces of ruins, with a pillar-shaft near a spring."[6]

Gottlieb Schumacher, as part of surveying for the construction of the Jezreel Valley railway, noted in 1900 that Ludd was a “flourishing village”, consisting of 46 huts and 200 inhabitants, built up by the Bedouin of the Merj.[7]

British Mandate era[edit]

In the 1922 census of Palestine conducted by the British Mandate authorities, the tribal area of Al Awadein had a population 402 Muslims,[8] increasing in the 1931 census to 451 Muslim inhabitants, in a total of 87 houses.[9]

In 1945 it had a population of 640 Muslims,[3] and the total land area was 13,572 dunams.[4] Of the land, 103 dunams were used for plantations and irrigable land, 13,063 for cereals,[10] while 52 dunams were built-up (urban) areas.[11]

1948 and aftermath[edit]

Following the war the area was incorporated into the State of Israel. The moshav of HaYogev was established in 1949, west of the village site and partly on village land.[5]

In 1992 the village site was described: "Piles of stones, scattered across the ground near several large eucalyptus and olive trees, are all that remain of the village. There is a newly-built structure over the village well."[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 151
  2. ^ a b Morris, 2004, p. xviii, village #385. Gives cause of depopulation and date as "Not known"
  3. ^ a b Department of Statistics, 1945, p. 14
  4. ^ a b Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 48
  5. ^ a b c d Khalidi, 1992, p. 174
  6. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1881, SWP I, p. 66
  7. ^ Schumacher, 1900, p. 358
  8. ^ Barron, 1923, Table XI, Sub-district of Haifa, p. 35
  9. ^ Mills, 1932, p. 94
  10. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 91
  11. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 141

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]