Near abroad

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In the political language of Russia and some other post-Soviet states, the near abroad (Russian: ближнее зарубежье, blizhneye zarubezhye) refers to the newly independent republics (other than Russia itself) which emerged after the dissolution of the Soviet Union.

History[edit]

Some sources claim that the term was popularised by Russian foreign minister Andrey Kozyrev in the early 1990s, referring to central and eastern Europe,[1] however the usage of the expression is attested before Kozyrev became minister, giving translators hard time.[2] Early attempts to translate the Russian term include "the concept of 'abroad close at hand,'" "nearby foreign lands," and "countries not far abroad."[2] As a result of the acceptance of the term "near abroad," the word "abroad" has acquired the function of a noun in English.[2]

"Near abroad" became more widely used in English, usually to assert Russia's right to have major influence in the region,[2][3][4] but also for marketing purposes by various companies.[citation needed] Russian President Vladimir Putin has declared the region Russia's "sphere of influence", and strategically vital for Russia.[4] The concept has been compared to the Monroe Doctrine.[2]

Countries in the "near abroad"[edit]

Baltic states[edit]

Central Asia[edit]

East Slavic states[edit]

Transcaucasia[edit]

Others[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Russian-Belarusian Union and the Near Abroad" (PDF). 2002-11-29. Retrieved 2011-05-09. 
  2. ^ a b c d e William Safire (1994-05-22). "ON LANGUAGE; The Near Abroad". The New York Times. Retrieved 2008-04-18. 
  3. ^ Robert Kagan (2008-02-06). "New Europe, Old Russia". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2008-04-18. 
  4. ^ a b Steven Erlanger (2001-02-25). "The World; Learning to Fear Putin's Gaze". New York Times. Retrieved 2008-04-18.