List of mountain ranges

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Physiographic world map with mountain ranges and highland areas in brown and gray colors

This is a list of mountain ranges organized alphabetically by continent. Ranges on other astronomical bodies are listed afterward.

Earth[edit]

By height[edit]

  • 1. Himalaya- Asia: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bhutan; highest point- Everest; 8848 meters above sea level.
  • 2. Karakoram (part of Greater Himalayas)- Asia: Pakistan, China, India; highest point- K2, 8611 meters above sea level.
  • 3. Hindu Kush (part of Greater Himalayas)- Asia: Afghanistan, Pakistan, Indian claim due to Kashmir dispute); highest point- Tirich Mir, 7708 meters above sea level.
  • 4. Pamirs (part of Greater Himalayas)- Asia: Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, China, Afghanistan; highest point- Kongur Tagh, 7649 meters above sea level, a peak included in the "Eastern Pamirs" [1] more often than in the Kunlun Mountains, as Kongur Tagh and the Kunlun range are separated by the large Yarkand River valley; no valley of such significance separates the Pamirs and Kongur Tagh, just political boundaries.
  • 5. Hengduan Mountains (part of Greater Himalayas)-Asia: China, Myanmar; highest point- Mount Gongga, 7556 meters above sea level.
  • 6. Tian Shan- Asia: China, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan; highest point- Jengish Chokusu, 7439 meters above sea level.
  • 7. Kunlun (part of Greater Himalayas)- Asia: China; highest point- Liushi Shan, 7167 meters above sea level.
  • 8. Nyenchen Tanglha (part of Greater Himalayas)- Asia; China; highest point- Mount Nyenchen Tanglha, 7162 meters above sea level.
  • 9. Andes- South America: Argentina, Chile, Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela; highest point- Aconcagua, 6962 meters above sea level.
  • 10. Alaska Range- North America: United States; highest point- Mount McKinley, 6194 meters above sea level.

All of the Asian ranges above have been formed in part over the past 35 to 55 million years by the collision between the Indian Plate and Eurasian Plate. The Indian Plate is still particularly mobile and these mountain ranges continue to rise in elevation every year; of these the Himalayas are rising most quickly; the Kashmir and Pamirs region to the north of the Indian subcontinent is the point of confluence of these mountains which encircle the Tibetan Plateau on three sides.

By continental area[edit]

Africa[edit]

Asia[edit]

Europe[edit]

See Category:Mountain ranges of Europe

North America[edit]

See Category:Mountain ranges of North America

Canada[edit]
Mexico[edit]
United States[edit]

Central America[edit]

South America[edit]

The largest mountain range in the world is the Andes,

Caribbean[edit]

Antarctica[edit]

Pacific[edit]

Ocean[edit]

Extraterrestrial[edit]

The Moon[edit]

By IAU convention, lunar mountain ranges are given Latin names.

Iapetus[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ N. O. Arnaud, M. Brunel, J. M. Cantagrel, P. Tapponnier (1993). "High cooling and denudation rates at Kongur Shan, Eastern Pamir (Xinjiang, China)". Tectonics Vol. 12 No. 3. American Geophysical Union Publications. pp. 1335–1346. Retrieved 2015-05-02. 
  2. ^ Ocean Facts, National Ocean Service