Collingsworth County, Texas

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Collingsworth County, Texas
Collingsworth County, TX, Court House, IMG 6175.JPG
Collingsworth County Courthouse in Wellington
Map of Texas highlighting Collingsworth County
Location in the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location in the U.S.
Founded 1890
Seat Wellington
Largest city Wellington
Area
 • Total 919 sq mi (2,380 km2)
 • Land 918 sq mi (2,378 km2)
 • Water 0.9 sq mi (2 km2), 0.1%
Population (est.)
 • (2015) 3,044
 • Density 3.3/sq mi (1.3/km2)
Congressional district 13th
Time zone Central: UTC−6/−5
Website www.co.collingsworth.tx.us

Collingsworth County is a county in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 3,057.[1] Its county seat is Wellington.[2] The county was created in 1876 and later organized in 1890.[3] It is named for James Collinsworth,[4] a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence and first chief justice of the Republic of Texas (a recording error in the bill accounts for the error in spelling, which was never corrected). Collingsworth County was one of 30[5] prohibition, or entirely dry, counties in Texas, but a vote in 2017 changed this law[6].

Republican Drew Springer, Jr., a businessman from Muenster in Cooke County, has since January 2013 represented Collingsworth County in the Texas House of Representatives.[7]

History[edit]

The county was created in 1876 from the Bexar and Young land district of Texas. Collingsworth County was organized in 1890 with Wellington as the county seat. From 1883 until 1896 the county was home to the English owned Rocking Chair Ranche.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 919 square miles (2,380 km2), of which 918 square miles (2,380 km2) is land and 0.9 square miles (2.3 km2) (0.1%) is water.[8]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18806
18903575,850.0%
19001,233245.4%
19105,224323.7%
19209,15475.2%
193014,46158.0%
194010,331−28.6%
19509,139−11.5%
19606,276−31.3%
19704,755−24.2%
19804,648−2.3%
19903,573−23.1%
20003,206−10.3%
20103,057−4.6%
Est. 20163,016[9]−1.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]
1850–2010[11] 2010–2014[1]

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 3,206 people, 1,294 households, and 916 families residing in the county. The population density was 4 inhabitants per square mile (1.5/km2). There were 1,723 housing units at an average density of 2 per square mile (0.77/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 79.82% White, 5.33% Black or African American, 1.62% Native American, 0.19% Asian, 10.89% from other races, and 2.15% from two or more races. 20.43% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 1,294 households out of which 29.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.50% were married couples living together, 9.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.20% were non-families. 27.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.97.

In the county, the population was spread out with 26.40% under the age of 18, 6.60% from 18 to 24, 22.60% from 25 to 44, 22.50% from 45 to 64, and 22.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 93.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $25,438, and the median income for a family was $33,323. Males had a median income of $24,808 versus $17,679 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,318. About 14.80% of families and 18.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.20% of those under age 18 and 16.40% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

City[edit]

Town[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Unincorporated community[edit]

Politics[edit]

Presidential Elections Results[13]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 85.0% 983 12.5% 145 2.4% 28
2012 83.7% 962 15.4% 177 1.0% 11
2008 78.9% 943 19.6% 234 1.5% 18
2004 75.2% 1,051 24.8% 346 0.1% 1
2000 68.8% 974 30.3% 429 0.8% 12
1996 50.9% 729 40.6% 581 8.5% 121
1992 43.6% 697 39.7% 635 16.8% 268
1988 51.8% 872 48.1% 809 0.1% 2
1984 65.0% 1,396 34.5% 742 0.5% 11
1980 55.1% 1,020 43.1% 798 1.8% 33
1976 34.9% 629 64.8% 1,169 0.3% 6
1972 71.4% 1,250 28.6% 501
1968 36.8% 712 38.6% 746 24.6% 475
1964 38.7% 724 61.2% 1,145 0.2% 3
1960 60.8% 1,084 38.8% 691 0.4% 7
1956 39.7% 815 59.8% 1,229 0.5% 11
1952 50.2% 1,334 49.7% 1,321 0.1% 2
1948 9.5% 198 85.2% 1,779 5.4% 112
1944 12.1% 261 79.8% 1,725 8.1% 176
1940 13.1% 307 86.7% 2,034 0.2% 5
1936 7.3% 158 92.6% 2,012 0.1% 2
1932 6.1% 115 93.3% 1,753 0.6% 11
1928 66.0% 1,179 34.0% 608
1924 23.7% 234 74.0% 731 2.3% 23
1920 30.5% 307 63.6% 640 6.0% 60
1916 4.6% 31 86.6% 589 8.8% 60
1912 3.1% 14 91.0% 414 5.9% 27

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 9, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Texas: Individual County Chronologies". Texas Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2008. Retrieved May 21, 2015. 
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 87. 
  5. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-05-16. Retrieved 2014-05-03. 
  6. ^ "TABC Wet and Dry Counties". www.tabc.state.tx.us. Retrieved 2018-06-27. 
  7. ^ "State Rep. Springer announces district tour July 30". Lubbock Avalanche-Journal, July 16, 2013. Retrieved July 18, 2013. 
  8. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 21, 2015. 
  9. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  10. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved April 21, 2015. 
  11. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved April 21, 2015. 
  12. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  13. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 34°58′N 100°16′W / 34.97°N 100.27°W / 34.97; -100.27