Collin County, Texas

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Collin County
Collin County
The Collin County Courthouse in McKinney
The Collin County Courthouse in McKinney
Flag of Collin County
Official seal of Collin County
Map of Texas highlighting Collin County
Location within the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 33°11′N 96°35′W / 33.18°N 96.58°W / 33.18; -96.58
Country United States
State Texas
Founded1846
Named forCollin McKinney
SeatMcKinney
Largest cityPlano
Area
 • Total886 sq mi (2,290 km2)
 • Land841 sq mi (2,180 km2)
 • Water45 sq mi (120 km2)  5.1%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total1,064,465 Increase
 • Density1,265/sq mi (488/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional districts3rd, 4th, 32nd
Websitewww.collincountytx.gov

Collin County is located in the U.S. state of Texas. It is part of the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington metropolitan statistical area, and a small portion of the city of Dallas is in the county. At the 2020 United States census, the county's population is 1,064,465, making it the sixth-most populous county in Texas and the 43rd-largest county by population in the United States.[1] Its county seat is McKinney.[2]

History[edit]

Both the county and the county seat were named after Collin McKinney (1766-1861),[3] one of the five men who drafted the Texas Declaration of Independence and the oldest of the 59 men who signed it.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has an area of 886 square miles (2,290 km2), of which 841 square miles (2,180 km2) is land and 45 square miles (120 km2) (5.1%) is covered by water.[4]

Lakes[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Communities[edit]

Cities (shared with other counties)[edit]

Cities[edit]

Towns[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Historical communities[edit]

Ghost towns[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18501,950
18609,264375.1%
187014,01351.3%
188025,98385.4%
189036,73641.4%
190050,08736.3%
191049,021−2.1%
192049,6091.2%
193046,180−6.9%
194047,1902.2%
195041,692−11.7%
196041,247−1.1%
197066,92062.2%
1980144,576116.0%
1990264,03682.6%
2000491,67586.2%
2010782,34159.1%
20201,064,46536.1%
2021 (est.)1,109,462[5]4.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1850–2010[7] 2010–2019[8]

In 2000, the U.S. Census Bureau determined 491,675 people resided in Collin County.[9] With the economic and population growth of the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex, its population increased to 1,064,465 at the 2020 U.S. census.[1] The population density as of 2019 was 1,229.8 people per square mile.[10] Among the population, its median age was 37.3, up from the statewide median age of 35.1. Linguistically, 11.6% of the county spoke Spanish as their household language, followed by Asian and Pacific Islander languages.[11] Altogether 29.7% of Collin County spoke a language other than English at home, contributed in part by its large foreign-born population which made up 22% of the population according to 2019 estimates from the American Community Survey.[12]

The median income for a household in the county as of 2019 was $96,134, up from $70,835 in 2000.[13] Families had a median household income of $113,471, married-couple families $127,575, and non-family households $53,986. An estimated 6.3% of Collin County's residents lived at or below the poverty line from 2014 to 2019.[14] In 2000, about 3.30% of families and 4.90% of the population lived at or below the poverty line, including 5.10% of those under age 18 and 7.10% of those aged 65 and older.

Of its residential properties, the median value of an owner-occupied housing unit was $354,100 in 2019, with a total of 8% of owner-occupied housing units ranging from less than $100,000 up to $200,000.[10] In 2007, Collin County was ranked No. 21 for high property taxes in the U.S. as percentage of the homes' value on owner-occupied housing.[15] It also tanked in the top 100 for amount of property taxes paid and for percentage of taxes of income. Part is this is due to the Robin Hood plan school financing system in Texas.[16]

Race and ethnicity[edit]

Demographic Profile of Collin County, Texas
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / Ethnicity Pop 2010[17] Pop 2020[18] % 2010 % 2020
White alone (NH) 493,492 542,472 63.08% 50.96%
Black or African American alone (NH) 64,715 108,100 8.27% 10.16%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH) 3,278 3,874 0.42% 0.36%
Asian alone (NH) 87,276 188,365 11.16% 17.70%
Pacific Islander alone (NH) 387 613 0.05% 0.06%
Some Other Race alone (NH) 1,364 4,910 0.17% 0.46%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH) 16,475 46,973 2.11% 4.41%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 115,354 169,158 14.74% 15.89%
Total 782,341 1,064,465 100.00% 100.00%

Note: the U.S. Census Bureau treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

At the 2000 census, the racial and ethnic makeup of the county was 81.39% White, 4.79% Black or African American, 0.47% Native American, 6.92% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 4.26% from other races, and 2.11% from two or more races; 10.27% of the population were Hispanic or Latino American of any race. In 2019, the American Community Survey estimated its non-Hispanic white population now represented 55%, reflecting a national demographic trend of diversification.[10][19] The Black or African American population grew to 10%, Asian Americans made up 16% of the population, and Hispanic or Latino Americans increased to 16% of the total population in 2019; multiracial Americans made up an estimated 2% of the county population.[10] The largest European ancestry groups from 2014 to 2019 were Germans, English Americans, and Irish and Italian Americans.[12] By the publication of the 2020 census, the racial and ethnic makeup of Collin County was 50.96% non-Hispanic white, 10.16% Black or African American, 0.36% American Indian or Alaska Native, 17.70% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.46% some other race, 4.41% multiracial, and 15.89% Hispanic or Latino American of any race.[18]

Religion[edit]

Christianity has historically been the predominant religious affiliation among the county's residents as part of the Bible Belt. According to the 2020 Public Religion Research Institute study, non-Christian religions are present and have been growing, largely due to migration into the county; among the non-Christian population, 3% were Hindu, 2% Muslim and 2% Jewish.[20] Overall among its Christian population, Baptists, Methodists, Catholics and non- or inter-denominational Christians have been prominent.

Government, courts, and politics[edit]

Government[edit]

Collin County, like all counties in Texas, is governed by a Commissioners Court. The court is chaired by a county judge (equivalent to a county executive in other states) who is elected county-wide, and four commissioners who are elected by the voters in each of four precincts.[21]

County Commissioners[edit]

Office[22] Name Party
  County Judge Chris Hill Republican
  Commissioner, Precinct 1 Susan Fletcher Republican
  Commissioner, Precinct 2 Cheryl Williams Republican
  Commissioner, Precinct 3 Darrell Hale Republican
  Commissioner, Precinct 4 Duncan Webb Republican

County officials[edit]

Office[22] Name Party
  County Clerk Stacey Kemp Republican
  Criminal District Attorney Greg Willis Republican
  District Clerk Lynne Finley Republican
  Sheriff Jim Skinner Republican
  Tax Assessor-Collector Kenneth Maun Republican

Politics[edit]

Since the 1960s, Collin County has consistently supported Republican candidates in presidential and congressional elections. The last Democrat to win the county was Lyndon Johnson in 1964. Two factors caused Collin to swing hard to the Republican Party in the 1960s and 1970s: the party realignment brought about by the civil rights movement, and the expansion of the Dallas suburbs into Collin County. No Democrat has represented any part of Collin County in the Texas Legislature since 1994.[23] In 2020, Collin County had become a political bellwether.[24]

United States presidential election results for Collin County, Texas[25]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 252,318 51.26% 230,945 46.92% 8,953 1.82%
2016 201,014 55.16% 140,624 38.59% 22,792 6.25%
2012 196,888 64.86% 101,415 33.41% 5,264 1.73%
2008 184,897 62.16% 109,047 36.66% 3,513 1.18%
2004 174,435 71.15% 68,935 28.12% 1,784 0.73%
2000 128,179 73.07% 42,884 24.45% 4,357 2.48%
1996 83,750 63.01% 37,854 28.48% 11,321 8.52%
1992 60,514 46.97% 24,508 19.02% 43,811 34.01%
1988 67,776 74.29% 22,934 25.14% 520 0.57%
1984 61,095 81.64% 13,604 18.18% 139 0.19%
1980 36,559 67.88% 15,187 28.20% 2,115 3.93%
1976 21,608 60.02% 14,039 39.00% 353 0.98%
1972 17,667 78.04% 4,783 21.13% 187 0.83%
1968 6,494 39.93% 5,918 36.39% 3,850 23.67%
1964 3,341 29.85% 7,833 69.98% 19 0.17%
1960 3,865 42.20% 5,229 57.10% 64 0.70%
1956 3,823 41.84% 5,280 57.79% 34 0.37%
1952 4,037 40.57% 5,906 59.36% 7 0.07%
1948 1,155 15.93% 5,516 76.08% 579 7.99%
1944 974 11.67% 6,574 78.79% 796 9.54%
1940 1,028 12.22% 7,373 87.65% 11 0.13%
1936 531 8.55% 5,669 91.29% 10 0.16%
1932 589 8.79% 6,059 90.46% 50 0.75%
1928 3,476 50.55% 3,377 49.11% 23 0.33%
1924 1,981 21.15% 7,215 77.04% 169 1.80%
1920 1,338 23.16% 4,045 70.01% 395 6.84%
1916 594 12.04% 4,141 83.94% 198 4.01%
1912 342 9.08% 3,187 84.58% 239 6.34%


State Board of Education member[edit]

District Name[26] Party
  District 12 Pam Little Republican

Texas State Representatives[edit]

District[26] Name Party Residence
  District 33 Justin Holland Republican Heath
  District 66 Matt Shaheen Republican Plano
  District 67 Jeff Leach Republican Plano
  District 70 Scott Sanford Republican McKinney
  District 89 Candy Noble Republican Lucas

Texas State Senators[edit]

District[26] Name Party Residence
  District 8 Angela Paxton Republican N/A
  District 30 Drew Springer Republican N/A

United States House of Representatives[edit]

District[26] Name Party Residence
  Texas's 3rd congressional district Van Taylor Republican Plano
  Texas's 4th congressional district Pat Fallon Republican Sherman
  Texas's 32nd congressional district Colin Allred Democrat Dallas

Education[edit]

K-12 education[edit]

The following school districts lie entirely within Collin County:[27]

The following districts lie partly within the county:

In the 1990s Plano ISD received many non-Hispanic white families leaving urban areas. From circa 1997 and 2015 the number of non-Hispanic white children in K-12 schools in the county increased by 40,000 as part of a trend of white flight and suburbanization by non-Hispanic white families; however the same number of Plano ISD in particular decreased by 10,000 in that period.[28]

Colleges and universities[edit]

Collin College opened its first campus on Highway 380 in McKinney in 1985.[29] The college has grown to seven campuses/locations—two in McKinney and two in Plano and as well as Frisco, Allen, Rockwall, Wylie, Farmersville, and Celina.[citation needed] Collin College's official service area includes all of Collin County.[30]

Dallas Baptist University also has an extension site in Frisco, DBU Frisco, as well as the University of North Texas's extension side, UNT Frisco.[31] The majority of the University of Texas at Dallas campus in Richardson, Texas lies within Collin County.[32]

Parks[edit]

Media[edit]

Collin County is part of the Dallas/Fort Worth media market. Local media outlets are: KDFW-TV, KXAS-TV, WFAA-TV, KTVT-TV, KERA-TV, KTXA-TV, KDFI-TV, KDAF-TV, and KFWD-TV. Other nearby stations that provide coverage for Collin County come from the Sherman/Denison market and they include: KTEN-TV and KXII-TV.

Newspapers in the Collin County area include the Allen American, Celina Record, Farmersville Times, Frisco Enterprise, McKinney Courier-Gazette, and the Plano Star-Courier. Nearby publications The Dallas Morning News and the Fort Worth Star-Telegram also provide news coverage of cities in the county.

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "2020 Population and Housing State Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on August 12, 2021. Retrieved August 20, 2021.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 87.
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 21, 2015.
  5. ^ "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Collin County, Texas". census.gov. Retrieved July 7, 2022.
  6. ^ "Census of Population and Housing from 1790". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  7. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved April 21, 2015.
  8. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 30, 2011. Retrieved December 9, 2013.
  9. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  10. ^ a b c d "Census profile: Collin County, TX". Census Reporter. Retrieved October 21, 2021.
  11. ^ "2019 Household Languages". data.census.gov. Archived from the original on October 21, 2021. Retrieved October 21, 2021.
  12. ^ a b "2019 Selected Social Characteristics". data.census.gov. Archived from the original on October 21, 2021. Retrieved October 21, 2021.
  13. ^ "2019 Annual Income Statistics". data.census.gov. Archived from the original on October 21, 2021. Retrieved October 21, 2021.
  14. ^ "2019 Poverty Statistics". data.census.gov. Archived from the original on October 21, 2021. Retrieved October 21, 2021.
  15. ^ "Tax Foundation". Tax Foundation.
  16. ^ Postrel, Virginia (October 7, 2004). "A Public Policy Failure". The New York Times.
  17. ^ "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Collin County, Texas". United States Census Bureau.
  18. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Collin County, Texas". United States Census Bureau.
  19. ^ "Census data: US is diversifying, white population shrinking". AP NEWS. August 13, 2021. Retrieved October 21, 2021.
  20. ^ "Americans make use of their religious freedom". Dallas News. August 11, 2021. Archived from the original on August 11, 2021. Retrieved October 21, 2021. Collin County scored slightly lower on the PRRI religious diversity scale than Dallas, but Collin County is 3% Hindu, 2% Muslim, and 2% Jewish, compared to 1% for those religions in Dallas County.
  21. ^ "Commissioners Court". www.collincountytx.gov. Retrieved November 3, 2017.
  22. ^ a b "Government". www.collincountytx.gov. Retrieved December 4, 2017.
  23. ^ "Legislative Reference Library | Legislators and Leaders | Texas Legislators: Past & Present". lrl.texas.gov. Retrieved September 9, 2021.
  24. ^ David Wasserman (October 6, 2020), "The 10 Bellwether Counties That Show How Trump Is in Serious Trouble", Nytimes.com
  25. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved July 20, 2018.
  26. ^ a b c d "Texas Redistricting". www.tlc.state.tx.us. Archived from the original on October 19, 2017. Retrieved November 3, 2017.
  27. ^ "2020 CENSUS - SCHOOL DISTRICT REFERENCE MAP: Collin County, TX" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved June 30, 2022. - Text list
  28. ^ Nicholson, Eric (May 3, 2016). "In Dallas, White Flight Never Ends". Dallas Observer. Retrieved October 29, 2019.
  29. ^ "Homepage - Collin College". www.collin.edu.
  30. ^ Texas Education Code, Sec. 130.175. COLLIN COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT SERVICE AREA.
  31. ^ "DBU Off-Campus Sites | Dallas Baptist University".
  32. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on November 19, 2012. Retrieved October 18, 2015.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 33°11′N 96°35′W / 33.18°N 96.58°W / 33.18; -96.58