Jasper County, Texas

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Jasper County, Texas
Jasper County Courthouse.JPG
Jasper County Courthouse
Map of Texas highlighting Jasper County
Location in the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location in the U.S.
Founded 1837
Named for William Jasper
Seat Jasper
Largest city Jasper
Area
 • Total 970 sq mi (2,512 km2)
 • Land 939 sq mi (2,432 km2)
 • Water 31 sq mi (80 km2), 3.2%
Population
 • (2010) 35,710
 • Density 38/sq mi (15/km2)
Congressional district 36th
Time zone Central: UTC−6/−5
Website www.co.jasper.tx.us

Jasper County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 35,710.[1] Its county seat is Jasper.[2] The county was created as a municipality in Mexico in 1834, and in 1837 was organized as a county in the Republic of Texas.[3][4][5] It is named for William Jasper, an American Revolutionary War hero.[6]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 970 square miles (2,500 km2), of which 939 square miles (2,430 km2) is land and 31 square miles (80 km2) (3.2%) is covered by water.[7]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected areas[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18501,767
18604,037128.5%
18704,2184.5%
18805,77937.0%
18905,592−3.2%
19007,13827.6%
191014,00096.1%
192015,56911.2%
193017,0649.6%
194017,4912.5%
195020,04914.6%
196022,10010.2%
197024,69211.7%
198030,78124.7%
199031,1021.0%
200035,60414.5%
201035,7100.3%
Est. 201635,648[8]−0.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]
1850–2010[10] 2010–2014[1]

As of the census[11] of 2000, 35,604 people, 13,450 households, and 9,966 families resided in the county. The population density was 38 people per square mile (15/km²). The 16,576 housing units averaged 18 per square mile (7/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 78.24% White, 17.81% Black or African American, 0.42% Native American, 0.32% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 2.04% from other races, and 1.15% from two or more races. About 3.89% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 13,450 households, 33.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.20% were married couples living together, 12.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.90% were not families. About 23% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.03.

In the county, the population was distributed as 26.50% under the age of 18, 8.00% from 18 to 24, 26.80% from 25 to 44, 23.40% from 45 to 64, and 15.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,902, and for a family was $35,709. Males had a median income of $31,739 versus $19,119 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,636. About 15.00% of families and 18.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.40% of those under age 18 and 17.80% of those age 65 or over.

Government[edit]

United States Congress[edit]

Senators Name Party First Elected Level
  Senate Class 1 John Cornyn Republican 1993 Senior Senator
  Senate Class 2 Ted Cruz Republican 2012 Junior Senator
Representatives Name Party First Elected Area(s) of Jasper County Represented
  District 36 Brian Babin Republican New district created with 2010 census. First elected 2014. Entire county


Presidential Elections Results[12]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 79.1% 10,609 19.3% 2,590 1.6% 220
2012 73.7% 9,957 25.3% 3,423 1.0% 137
2008 70.6% 9,022 28.6% 3,658 0.8% 96
2004 64.8% 8,347 34.7% 4,471 0.4% 55
2000 60.2% 7,071 38.6% 4,533 1.2% 138
1996 42.5% 4,523 47.4% 5,039 10.1% 1,078
1992 32.0% 3,870 46.8% 5,658 21.2% 2,559
1988 42.9% 4,985 56.9% 6,613 0.3% 31
1984 50.6% 5,965 49.1% 5,787 0.2% 27
1980 42.9% 4,396 55.6% 5,707 1.5% 154
1976 36.8% 3,167 63.0% 5,422 0.2% 18
1972 62.5% 4,575 37.5% 2,746 0.1% 4
1968 25.6% 1,839 33.9% 2,438 40.5% 2,906
1964 34.7% 1,919 65.0% 3,600 0.3% 18
1960 41.0% 2,102 58.6% 3,004 0.3% 17
1956 56.4% 2,430 43.1% 1,856 0.5% 22
1952 42.8% 1,946 57.1% 2,595 0.0% 2
1948 11.2% 284 70.3% 1,777 18.4% 466
1944 14.1% 341 76.2% 1,850 9.7% 236
1940 9.0% 220 91.0% 2,236
1936 6.8% 109 93.1% 1,500 0.2% 3
1932 4.5% 93 95.5% 1,990 0.1% 1
1928 40.4% 611 59.4% 898 0.1% 2
1924 10.2% 176 88.8% 1,526 1.0% 17
1920 5.7% 62 72.4% 793 21.9% 240
1916 7.3% 75 88.3% 906 4.4% 45
1912 4.3% 40 68.0% 628 27.7% 256

County officials[edit]

  • County Judge - Judge Mark W. Allen
  • Commissioner, Pct. #1 - Charles Shofner, Jr.
  • Commissioner, Pct. #2 - Roy Parker
  • Commissioner, Pct. #3 - Willie Stark
  • Commissioner, Pct. #4 - Vance Moss
  • County Sheriff - Mitchel Newman
  • Tax Assessor/Collector - Bobby Biscamp
  • County Clerk - Debbie Newman
  • County Treasurer - René Kelley
  • County Auditor - Renee Weaver
  • Tax Appraiser - David Luther
  • Emergency Management Coordinator - Billy Ted Smith

District officials[edit]

  • District Judge - Judicial District 1 - Judge Craig M. Mixson (appointed by Texas Governor Rick Perry to complete term of Judge Gary Gatlin, who resigned effective December 31, 2011)
  • District Judge - Judicial District 1A - Judge Jerome Owens
  • District Clerk - Kathy Kent
  • District Attorney - Steven M. Hollis

Courts[edit]

  • Justice of the Peace, Pct. #1 - Ronny Billingsley
  • Justice of the Peace, Pct. #2 - Freddie Miller
  • Justice of the Peace, Pct. #3 - Mike Smith
  • Justice of the Peace, Pct. #4 - Daniel Whitton
  • Justice of the Peace, Pct. #5 - Brett Holloway
  • Justice of the Peace, Pct. #6 - Steve Conner
  • Constable, Pct. #1 - Kit Stephenson
  • Constable, Pct. #2 - Ralph Nichols
  • Constable, Pct. #3 - Ronnie Hutchison
  • Constable, Pct. #4 - Gene Hawthorne
  • Constable, Pct. #5 - Michael Poindexter
  • Constable, Pct. #6 - Tommy R. Robinson

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Ghost towns[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 12, 2011. Retrieved December 18, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Texas: Individual County Chronologies". Texas Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2008. Retrieved June 20, 2015. 
  4. ^ "Jasper County". Texas Almanac. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved June 20, 2015. 
  5. ^ Glenn Justice (June 15, 2010). "Jasper County". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved June 20, 2015. 
  6. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 168. 
  7. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved May 2, 2015. 
  8. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  9. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved May 2, 2015. 
  10. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved May 2, 2015. 
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  12. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 30°44′N 94°02′W / 30.74°N 94.03°W / 30.74; -94.03