Calhoun County, Texas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Calhoun County
Calhoun County Courthouse
Calhoun County Courthouse
Map of Texas highlighting Calhoun County
Location within the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 28°26′N 96°37′W / 28.44°N 96.61°W / 28.44; -96.61
Country United States
State Texas
Founded1846
Named forJohn C. Calhoun
SeatPort Lavaca
Largest cityPort Lavaca
Area
 • Total1,033 sq mi (2,680 km2)
 • Land507 sq mi (1,310 km2)
 • Water526 sq mi (1,360 km2)  51%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total20,106
 • Density39.7/sq mi (15.3/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district27th
Websitewww.calhouncotx.org

Calhoun County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2020 census, the population was 20,106.[1] Its county seat is Port Lavaca.[2] The county is named for John Caldwell Calhoun, the seventh vice president of the United States. Calhoun County comprises the Port Lavaca, TX Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Victoria-Port Lavaca, TX Combined Statistical Area.

History[edit]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,033 square miles (2,680 km2), of which 507 square miles (1,310 km2) is land and 526 square miles (1,360 km2) (51%) is water.[21] It borders the Gulf of Mexico.

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected area[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18501,110
18602,642138.0%
18703,44330.3%
18801,739−49.5%
1890815−53.1%
19002,395193.9%
19103,63551.8%
19204,70029.3%
19305,38514.6%
19405,9119.8%
19509,22256.0%
196016,59279.9%
197017,8317.5%
198019,5749.8%
199019,053−2.7%
200020,6478.4%
201021,3813.6%
202020,106−6.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[22]
1850–2010[23] 2010–2020[1]

2020 census[edit]

Calhoun County racial composition
(NH = Non-Hispanic)[a]
Race Pop 2010[26] Pop 2020[27] % 2010 % 2020
White (NH) 9,794 8,374 45.81% 41.65%
Black or African American (NH) 519 361 2.43% 1.8%
Native American or Alaska Native (NH) 36 34 0.17% 0.17%
Asian (NH) 943 1,112 4.41% 5.53%
Pacific Islander (NH) 4 0 0.02% 0.0%
Some Other Race (NH) 15 56 0.07% 0.28%
Mixed/Multi-Racial (NH) 148 311 0.69% 1.55%
Hispanic or Latino 9,922 9,858 46.41% 49.03%
Total 21,381 20,106

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 20,106 people, 8,027 households, and 5,502 families residing in the county.

2010 census[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 21,381 people living in the county. 81.5% were White, 4.4% Asian, 2.6% Black or African American, 0.5% Native American, 8.8% of some other race and 2.1% of two or more races. 46.4% were Hispanic or Latino (of any race).

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[28] of 2000, there were 20,647 people, 7,442 households, and 5,574 families living in the county. The population density was 40 people per square mile (16/km2). There were 10,238 housing units at an average density of 20 per square mile (8/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 78.04% White, 2.63% Black or African American, 0.49% Native American, 3.27% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 13.19% from other races, and 2.32% from two or more races. 40.92% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 11.4% were of German, 9.4% American and 5.5% English ancestry according to Census 2000. 67.9% spoke English, 29.1% Spanish and 1.2% Chinese as their first language.

There were 7,442 households, out of which 35.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.20% were married couples living together, 11.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.10% were non-families. 21.30% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.20.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 28.50% under the age of 18, 8.70% from 18 to 24, 27.30% from 25 to 44, 22.30% from 45 to 64, and 13.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $35,849, and the median income for a family was $39,900. Males had a median income of $35,957 versus $19,772 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,125. About 12.70% of families and 16.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.30% of those under age 18 and 11.70% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

All of Calhoun County is served by the Calhoun County Independent School District.

Our Lady of the Gulf Catholic school, pre-K through grade 8, has also served the county since 1996.

Transportation[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Airport[edit]

Calhoun County Airport, a general aviation airport, is located in unincorporated Calhoun County northwest of Port Lavaca.

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Other unincorporated communities[edit]

Ghost town[edit]

Politics[edit]

United States presidential election results for Calhoun County, Texas[29]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 5,641 71.80% 2,148 27.34% 67 0.85%
2016 4,638 66.50% 2,118 30.37% 218 3.13%
2012 4,144 62.33% 2,410 36.25% 94 1.41%
2008 4,106 59.69% 2,729 39.67% 44 0.64%
2004 4,348 62.75% 2,561 36.96% 20 0.29%
2000 3,724 56.74% 2,766 42.15% 73 1.11%
1996 2,832 46.33% 2,753 45.04% 528 8.64%
1992 2,640 38.94% 2,550 37.62% 1,589 23.44%
1988 3,183 48.79% 3,314 50.80% 27 0.41%
1984 4,434 62.99% 2,586 36.74% 19 0.27%
1980 3,312 50.57% 3,034 46.33% 203 3.10%
1976 2,377 39.22% 3,642 60.09% 42 0.69%
1972 3,614 64.93% 1,936 34.78% 16 0.29%
1968 1,672 31.25% 2,612 48.82% 1,066 19.93%
1964 1,031 23.25% 3,398 76.64% 5 0.11%
1960 1,599 44.49% 1,961 54.56% 34 0.95%
1956 1,912 63.90% 1,067 35.66% 13 0.43%
1952 1,406 63.28% 813 36.59% 3 0.14%
1948 346 33.59% 589 57.18% 95 9.22%
1944 158 14.73% 732 68.22% 183 17.05%
1940 152 13.97% 935 85.94% 1 0.09%
1936 92 11.78% 685 87.71% 4 0.51%
1932 100 10.59% 834 88.35% 10 1.06%
1928 333 46.84% 375 52.74% 3 0.42%
1924 181 20.07% 686 76.05% 35 3.88%
1920 95 16.93% 363 64.71% 103 18.36%
1916 84 15.44% 388 71.32% 72 13.24%
1912 36 7.84% 355 77.34% 68 14.81%


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Calhoun County, Texas". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i Kleiner, Diana. "Calhoun County". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved December 2, 2010.
  4. ^ Little, Carol Morris (1996). A Comprehensive Guide to Outdoor Sculpture in Texas. University of Texas Press. pp. 358–359. ISBN 978-0-292-76036-3.
  5. ^ Wade, Marian F and Don E; Hester, Thomas R (2002). The Native Americans of the Texas Edwards Plateau, 1582-1799. University of Texas Press. p. 145. ISBN 978-0-292-79156-5.
  6. ^ Roell, Craig H. "John Joseph Linn". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved December 2, 2010.
  7. ^ Roell, Craig H. "Linnville Raid of 1840". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved December 2, 2010.
  8. ^ Morgenthaler, Jefferson (2009). Promised Land: Solms, Castro, and Sam Houston's Colonization Contracts. TAMU Press. p. 135. ISBN 978-1-60344-119-3.
  9. ^ a b c "Indianola". Texas Escapes. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved December 2, 2010.
  10. ^ "MORGAN LINES". tshaonline.org. June 15, 2010. Retrieved April 10, 2018.
  11. ^ Obedele-Starks, Ernest (2007). Freebooters and Smugglers: The Foreign Slave Trade in the United States after 1808. University of Arkansas Press. p. 119. ISBN 978-1-55728-858-5.
  12. ^ Jones, Ray (2002). American Lighthouses, 2nd: A Definitive Guide. Globe Pequot. pp. 169–170. ISBN 978-0-7627-2269-3.
  13. ^ Townsend, Stephen A (2006). The Yankee Invasion of Texas. TAMU Press. p. 28. ISBN 978-1-58544-487-8.
  14. ^ "Port Lavaca". Texas Escapes. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved December 2, 2010.
  15. ^ Norcross, Bryan (2007). Hurricane Almanac: The Essential Guide to Storms Past, Present, and Future. St. Martin's Griffin. pp. 38–39.
  16. ^ "Oliva, Texas". Texas Escapes. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved December 2, 2010.
  17. ^ "Port O'Connor". Texas Escapes. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved December 2, 2010.
  18. ^ "Point Comfort". Texas Escapes. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved December 2, 2010.
  19. ^ Michaels, Patrick J (2005). Meltdown: The Predictable Distortion of Global Warming by Scientists, Politicians, and the Media. Cato Institute. p. 112. ISBN 978-1-930865-79-2.
  20. ^ "Matagorda Island Wildlife Management Area". Shannon D. Moore. Archived from the original on December 1, 2010. Retrieved December 2, 2010.
  21. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 20, 2015.
  22. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 20, 2015.
  23. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved April 20, 2015.
  24. ^ http://www.census.gov[not specific enough to verify]
  25. ^ "About the Hispanic Population and its Origin". www.census.gov. Retrieved May 18, 2022.
  26. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved May 21, 2022.
  27. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved May 21, 2022.
  28. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  29. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved April 10, 2018.
  1. ^ Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.[24][25]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 28°26′N 96°37′W / 28.44°N 96.61°W / 28.44; -96.61