Childress County, Texas

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Childress County, Texas
Veterans Memorial in Childress IMG 0688.JPG
Veterans Memorial at the Childress County Courthouse in Childress
Map of Texas highlighting Childress County
Location in the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location in the U.S.
Founded 1887
Named for George Campbell Childress
Seat Childress
Largest city Childress
Area
 • Total 714 sq mi (1,849 km2)
 • Land 696 sq mi (1,803 km2)
 • Water 17 sq mi (44 km2), 2.4%
Population (est.)
 • (2015) 7,088
 • Density 10/sq mi (4/km²)
Congressional district 13th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.childresscountytexas.us

Childress County (/ˈɪldrs/ CHILL-driss) is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 7,041.[1] The county seat is Childress.[2] The county was created in 1876 and later organized in 1887.[3] It is named for George Campbell Childress, the author of the Texas Declaration of Independence.

County and regional history is preserved in the Childress County Heritage Museum in downtown Childress. The Bradley 3 Ranch, operated by matriarch Minnie Lou Bradley, is entirely in Childress County but has a Memphis (Hall County) mailing address.

Republican Drew Springer, Jr., a businessman from Muenster in Cooke County, has since January 2013 represented Childress County in the Texas House of Representatives.[4]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 714 square miles (1,850 km2), of which 696 square miles (1,800 km2) is land and 17 square miles (44 km2) (2.4%) is water.[5]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 25
1890 1,175 4,600.0%
1900 2,138 82.0%
1910 9,538 346.1%
1920 10,933 14.6%
1930 16,044 46.7%
1940 12,149 −24.3%
1950 12,123 −0.2%
1960 8,421 −30.5%
1970 6,605 −21.6%
1980 6,950 5.2%
1990 5,953 −14.3%
2000 7,688 29.1%
2010 7,041 −8.4%
Est. 2016 7,052 [6] 0.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1850–2010[8] 2010–2014[1]

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 7,688 people, 2,474 households, and 1,650 families residing in the county. The population density was 11 people per square mile (4/km²). There were 3,059 housing units at an average density of 4 per square mile (2/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 67.70% White, 14.09% Black or African American, 0.33% Native American, 0.30% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 15.70% from other races, and 1.83% from two or more races. 20.47% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 2,474 households out of which 31.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.40% were married couples living together, 11.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.30% were non-families. 30.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the county, the population was spread out with 22.10% under the age of 18, 12.10% from 18 to 24, 30.60% from 25 to 44, 19.40% from 45 to 64, and 15.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 142.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 149.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $27,457, and the median income for a family was $35,543. Males had a median income of $25,606 versus $20,037 for females. The per capita income for the county was $12,452. About 13.70% of families and 17.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.30% of those under age 18 and 10.30% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

City[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Politics[edit]

Presidential Elections Results[10]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 86.5% 1,802 12.1% 253 1.4% 29
2012 83.4% 1,665 16.0% 320 0.6% 11
2008 77.6% 1,782 21.7% 497 0.7% 17
2004 76.0% 1,629 23.8% 511 0.2% 4
2000 70.8% 1,506 28.3% 602 0.9% 18
1996 54.6% 1,072 36.7% 719 8.7% 171
1992 44.2% 1,033 37.7% 881 18.1% 424
1988 53.0% 1,201 46.8% 1,060 0.3% 6
1984 63.4% 1,574 36.3% 900 0.3% 7
1980 53.2% 1,443 45.0% 1,222 1.8% 48
1976 39.7% 1,043 60.1% 1,578 0.2% 5
1972 69.8% 1,716 29.7% 729 0.5% 13
1968 37.9% 1,045 39.6% 1,093 22.5% 621
1964 32.5% 952 67.5% 1,977 0.1% 2
1960 56.8% 1,571 43.0% 1,189 0.3% 7
1956 45.6% 1,268 54.1% 1,503 0.3% 9
1952 50.1% 1,890 49.8% 1,879 0.1% 2
1948 9.8% 273 86.2% 2,415 4.0% 113
1944 10.7% 299 82.1% 2,295 7.3% 203
1940 10.9% 335 89.0% 2,729 0.1% 3
1936 9.1% 209 90.0% 2,076 1.0% 22
1932 6.8% 153 92.6% 2,072 0.6% 13
1928 66.5% 1,438 33.6% 726
1924 13.0% 178 81.8% 1,117 5.2% 71
1920 11.0% 158 84.0% 1,206 5.0% 72
1916 2.9% 31 89.5% 948 7.6% 80
1912 4.2% 34 89.9% 721 5.9% 47

See also[edit]

'Past Sheriff's of Childress County

  • Harry Munday 1888-1890
  • B.J. Matthews 1891-1894
  • Percy Roberts 1895-1898
  • Fred Estes 1900-1902
  • Henry Bellah 1903-1906
  • J.W. Cochran 1907-1910
  • Jack Brown 1911-1916
  • Mel Dwight 1917-1920
  • Jim Crain 1921-1924
  • John Compton 1925-1928
  • Wyatt Smith 1929-1930
  • W.E. Cox 1931-1934
  • J.D.Moore 1935-1942
  • Paul Griffin 1953-1954
  • Gaylon Smith 1955-1962
  • J.E. Benham 1963-1980
  • Ronald Sims 1981-1984
  • Claude Lane 1985-1991
  • Reece Bowen 1991-1995
  • Kevin W. Overstreet 1995-1999
  • Darin W. Smith 1999 2006

The First Narcotic's Drug Dog

Rona was the first Drug dog for Childress County. Kevin Overstreet was her handler who was then the Chief Deputy who later became the 21st Sheriff. Rona was responsible for taking approximately 750,000.00 dollars worth of drugs off the street. She passed away in 1996 and was buried on the grounds of the Childress County Courthouse. Rona's grave is marked with her name "Rona" on the south side of the Childress County Courthouse. [11][12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 9, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2015-05-10. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Texas: Individual County Chronologies". Texas Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2008. Retrieved May 21, 2015. 
  4. ^ "State Rep. Springer announces district tour July 30". Lubbock Avalanche-Journal, July 16, 2013. Retrieved July 18, 2013. 
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 20, 2015. 
  6. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved April 20, 2015. 
  8. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved April 20, 2015. 
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  10. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  11. ^ The Childress Index
  12. ^ Amarillo Globe News

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 34°32′N 100°12′W / 34.54°N 100.20°W / 34.54; -100.20