KCNK10

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KCNK10
Available structures
PDBHuman UniProt search: PDBe RCSB
Identifiers
AliasesKCNK10, K2p10.1, PPP1R97, TREK-2, TREK2, potassium two pore domain channel subfamily K member 10
External IDsOMIM: 605873 MGI: 1919508 HomoloGene: 11321 GeneCards: KCNK10
Gene location (Human)
Chromosome 14 (human)
Chr.Chromosome 14 (human)[1]
Chromosome 14 (human)
Genomic location for KCNK10
Genomic location for KCNK10
Band14q31.3Start88,180,103 bp[1]
End88,326,907 bp[1]
Orthologs
SpeciesHumanMouse
Entrez
Ensembl
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)

NM_021161
NM_138317
NM_138318

NM_029911
NM_001316664
NM_001316665
NM_001316666

RefSeq (protein)

NP_066984
NP_612190
NP_612191

n/a

Location (UCSC)Chr 14: 88.18 – 88.33 MbChr 12: 98.43 – 98.58 Mb
PubMed search[3][4]
Wikidata
View/Edit HumanView/Edit Mouse

Potassium channel, subfamily K, member 10, also known as KCNK10 is a human gene. The protein encoded by this gene, K2P10.1, is a potassium channel containing two pore-forming P domains.[5][6][7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000100433 - Ensembl, May 2017
  2. ^ a b c GRCm38: Ensembl release 89: ENSMUSG00000033854 - Ensembl, May 2017
  3. ^ "Human PubMed Reference:". National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  4. ^ "Mouse PubMed Reference:". National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  5. ^ Lesage F, Terrenoire C, Romey G, Lazdunski M (September 2000). "Human TREK2, a 2P domain mechano-sensitive K+ channel with multiple regulations by polyunsaturated fatty acids, lysophospholipids, and Gs, Gi, and Gq protein-coupled receptors". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. 275 (37): 28398–405. doi:10.1074/jbc.M002822200. PMID 10880510.
  6. ^ Goldstein SA, Bayliss DA, Kim D, Lesage F, Plant LD, Rajan S (December 2005). "International Union of Pharmacology. LV. Nomenclature and molecular relationships of two-P potassium channels". Pharmacological Reviews. 57 (4): 527–40. doi:10.1124/pr.57.4.12. PMID 16382106.
  7. ^ Dong YY, Pike AC, Mackenzie A, McClenaghan C, Aryal P, Dong L, Quigley A, Grieben M, Goubin S, Mukhopadhyay S, Ruda GF, Clausen MV, Cao L, Brennan PE, Burgess-Brown NA, Sansom MS, Tucker SJ, Carpenter EP (March 2015). "K2P channel gating mechanisms revealed by structures of TREK-2 and a complex with Prozac". Science. 347 (6227): 1256–9. doi:10.1126/science.1261512. PMC 6034649. PMID 25766236.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]